What does English mean?

Definitions for English
ˈɪŋ glɪʃ or, often, -lɪʃEnglish

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word English.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. English, English language(noun)

    an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries

  2. English, English people(noun)

    the people of England

  3. English(noun)

    the discipline that studies the English language and literature

  4. English, side(adj)

    (sports) the spin given to a ball by striking it on one side or releasing it with a sharp twist

  5. English(adj)

    of or relating to or characteristic of England or its culture or people

    "English history"; "the English landed aristocracy"; "English literature"

  6. English(adj)

    of or relating to the English language

Wiktionary

  1. English(Noun)

    One's ability to employ the English language correctly.

    You can't hit it directly, but maybe if you give it some english.

  2. English(Noun)

    The English-language term or expression for something.

    What's the English for u2018u00E0 peu pru00E8s'?

  3. English(Noun)

    Specific language or wording; a text or statements in speech, whether a translation or otherwise.

    The technical details are correct, but the English is not very clear.

  4. English(Noun)

    (countable) A regional type of spoken and or written English; a dialect.

  5. English(Verb)

    To translate, adapt or render into English.

  6. English(Adjective)

    English-language; of or pertaining to the English language.

  7. English(Adjective)

    Of or pertaining to England or its people.

  8. English(Adjective)

    Of or pertaining to an Englishman or Englishwoman.

  9. English(Adjective)

    Of or pertaining to the avoirdupois system of measure.

    an English ton

  10. English(ProperNoun)

    The language originating in England but now spoken in all parts of the British Isles, the Commonwealth of Nations, the United States of America, and other parts of the world.

    English is spoken here as an unofficial language and lingua franca.

  11. English(ProperNoun)

    (collective plural) The people of England; Englishmen and Englishwomen.

    The Scottish and English have a history of conflict.

  12. english(Noun)

    Spinning or rotary motion given to a ball around the vertical axis, as in billiards or bowling.

    You can't hit it directly, but maybe if you give it some english.

Webster Dictionary

  1. English(adj)

    of or pertaining to England, or to its inhabitants, or to the present so-called Anglo-Saxon race

    Etymology: [AS. Englisc, fr. Engle, Angle, Engles, Angles, a tribe of Germans from the southeast of Sleswick, in Denmark, who settled in Britain and gave it the name of England. Cf. Anglican.]

  2. English(adj)

    see 1st Bond, n., 8

    Etymology: [AS. Englisc, fr. Engle, Angle, Engles, Angles, a tribe of Germans from the southeast of Sleswick, in Denmark, who settled in Britain and gave it the name of England. Cf. Anglican.]

  3. English(noun)

    collectively, the people of England; English people or persons

    Etymology: [AS. Englisc, fr. Engle, Angle, Engles, Angles, a tribe of Germans from the southeast of Sleswick, in Denmark, who settled in Britain and gave it the name of England. Cf. Anglican.]

  4. English(noun)

    the language of England or of the English nation, and of their descendants in America, India, and other countries

    Etymology: [AS. Englisc, fr. Engle, Angle, Engles, Angles, a tribe of Germans from the southeast of Sleswick, in Denmark, who settled in Britain and gave it the name of England. Cf. Anglican.]

  5. English(noun)

    a kind of printing type, in size between Pica and Great Primer. See Type

    Etymology: [AS. Englisc, fr. Engle, Angle, Engles, Angles, a tribe of Germans from the southeast of Sleswick, in Denmark, who settled in Britain and gave it the name of England. Cf. Anglican.]

  6. English(noun)

    a twist or spinning motion given to a ball in striking it that influences the direction it will take after touching a cushion or another ball

    Etymology: [AS. Englisc, fr. Engle, Angle, Engles, Angles, a tribe of Germans from the southeast of Sleswick, in Denmark, who settled in Britain and gave it the name of England. Cf. Anglican.]

  7. English(verb)

    to translate into the English language; to Anglicize; hence, to interpret; to explain

    Etymology: [AS. Englisc, fr. Engle, Angle, Engles, Angles, a tribe of Germans from the southeast of Sleswick, in Denmark, who settled in Britain and gave it the name of England. Cf. Anglican.]

  8. English(verb)

    to strike (the cue ball) in such a manner as to give it in addition to its forward motion a spinning motion, that influences its direction after impact on another ball or the cushion

    Etymology: [AS. Englisc, fr. Engle, Angle, Engles, Angles, a tribe of Germans from the southeast of Sleswick, in Denmark, who settled in Britain and gave it the name of England. Cf. Anglican.]

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. English

    ing′glish, adj. belonging to England or its inhabitants.—n. the language of the people of England.—v.t. to translate a book into English: to make English.—ns. Eng′lander, an Englishman; Eng′lisher, Eng′lishman, a native or naturalised inhabitant of England; Eng′lishry, the fact of being an Englishman; in Ireland, the population of English descent.—Old English, or Anglo-Saxon, the language spoken in England from 450 till about 1150; Middle English till 1500; Modern English from 1500 onwards (Early English often means Early Middle English; (archit.), see Early).—Presentment of Englishry, the offering of proof that a person murdered belonged to the English race, to escape the fine levied on the hundred or township for the murder of a Norman. [A.S. Englisc, from Engle, Angle, from the Angles who settled in Britain.]

The New Hacker's Dictionary

  1. English

    1. n. obs. The source code for a program, which may be in any language, as opposed to the linkable or executable binary produced from it by a compiler. The idea behind the term is that to a real hacker, a program written in his favorite programming language is at least as readable as English. Usage: mostly by old-time hackers, though recognizable in context. Today the preferred shorthand is simply source. 2. The official name of the database language used by the old Pick Operating System, actually a sort of crufty, brain-damaged SQL with delusions of grandeur. The name permitted marketroids to say “Yes, and you can program our computers in English!” to ignorant suits without quite running afoul of the truth-in-advertising laws.

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. english

    A term applied to the vessels and men of the whole empire, and its maritime population. "Indeed," says Burke in a letter to Admiral Keppel, "I am perfectly convinced that Englishman and seaman are names that must live and die together."

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'English' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #619

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'English' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1342

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'English' in Nouns Frequency: #587

  4. Adjectives Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'English' in Adjectives Frequency: #75

How to pronounce English?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say English in sign language?

  1. english

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of English in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of English in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of English in a Sentence

  1. Arnold Flores:

    Every day I saw my son through a fence ... One day, as he cried, he said 'daddy they're going to deport you,' that same day the officers called me, a defense attorney said something to me in English that I didn't understand and I haven't seen my son since.

  2. Akram Al Deek:

    One of the reasons for which you ultimately became a teacher, however, is the way by which you were taught. You came to realise that teaching is a political act at the heart of which lies political change. You became a teacher to rectify things. Because you had a great responsibility towards the future. As a teenager, you attended an average boys’ public school in a suburban area of a small city in the northeast of Jordan. It was a school where English was not obligatory until the sixth grade. A school where you were taught to stand up for your superiors as they walked into class, and where any eye-contact was frowned upon. A school where you were inspected for your haircut, nails, and shoes but not your concerns. A school where it mattered more where you are from than who you are. A school where the science teacher taught geography, sports, and Islamic religion, too. A school where you were grabbed by the ears and pulled up, hit repeatedly on the knuckles and slapped on the face for not remembering the capital of Cambodia. And for that you never forgot the capital of Cambodia. A school where philosophy was marginalised by religion. And where you had to wait in queues to urinate because toilets were busy with concealed homosexual activities. A school where during winter you had to wear layers and layers of wool and cotton because there was no central heating, double-glazed windows, or even curtains. A school where the drawing studio was used as a canteen by teachers during lunch-time only. A school where there was no awareness of the disconnection between the teaching curriculum and societal needs. A school where the story always goes with Mr Ali in the office, while Mrs Ali is always in the kitchen. A school where most teachers finished classes 15 to 20 minutes earlier so that they could exploit parents and students in highly expensive private classes outside the school. A school where all music classes were spent teaching you how to play the national anthem. A school where it was always easier to deny and reject than debate and accept. A school where the quiet boy was always neglected. A school where you were always asked what to do, but never did anyone ever do what you asked: to listen. A school where your colleagues were scolded for being overtaken in class by a Palestinian student.

  3. David Kim:

    I feel extremely proud, the Korean pride is exploding, it's absolutely unbelievable. If you think of this small country... and this small group that doesn't even speak English, spreading all this Korean culture and topping the charts and stuff, it's just unbelievable.

  4. Nava Nuraniyah:

    They are preyed upon and exploited by militant cells who essentially view them as cash cows, they have a stable income, speak English and usually have a broad international network, making them ideal( targets).

  5. Adrian Calabano:

    I’ve heard some complaints from my other Filipino teachers, I mean, from my friends, that some American teachers, they think we’re incompetent, especially in speaking English, for some parents, I’ve heard some of my friends, they told me that some parents are hard to deal with. I ’m not sure if it’s because of their kids or if it relates to our country.

Images & Illustrations of English

  1. EnglishEnglishEnglishEnglishEnglish

Popularity rank by frequency of use

English#1#447#10000

Translations for English

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

Get even more translations for English »

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