What does Edinburgh mean?

Definitions for Edinburgh
ˈɛd nˌbɜr ə, -ˌbʌr ə; esp. Brit. -brəed·in·burgh

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Edinburgh.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Edinburghnoun

    the capital of Scotland; located in the Lothian Region on the south side of the Firth of Forth

Wiktionary

  1. Edinburghnoun

    The capital of Scotland.

  2. Etymology: From burg, castle, from burgz, from bhrgh.

Wikipedia

  1. Edinburgh

    Edinburgh ( (listen) Scots: [ˈɛdɪnbʌrə]; Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Èideann [ˌt̪un ˈeːtʲən̪ˠ]) is the capital city of Scotland and one of its 32 council areas. The city was historically part of the county of Midlothian (formally called the "county of Edinburgh" or Edinburghshire until 1947), but was administered separately from the surrounding county from 1482 onwards. It is located in Lothian on the southern shore of the Firth of Forth. Edinburgh is Scotland's second-most populous city, after Glasgow, and the seventh-most populous city in the United Kingdom. Recognised as the capital of Scotland since at least the 15th century, Edinburgh is the seat of the Scottish Government, the Scottish Parliament and the highest courts in Scotland. The city's Palace of Holyroodhouse is the official residence of the British monarchy in Scotland. The city has long been a centre of education, particularly in the fields of medicine, Scottish law, literature, philosophy, the sciences, and engineering. It is the second-largest financial centre in the United Kingdom, and the city's historical and cultural attractions have made it the UK's second-most visited tourist destination attracting 4.9 million visits, including 2.4 million from overseas in 2018. Time Out magazine rated Edinburgh the best city in the world in 2022.Edinburgh's official population estimates are 506,520 (mid-2020) for the locality, 518,500 (mid-2019) for the City of Edinburgh council area, which takes in some outlying villages in the western part of its territory, and 1,384,950 (2019) for the wider Edinburgh and South East Scotland city region which also includes East Lothian, Fife, Midlothian, the Scottish Borders and West Lothian.The city is the annual venue of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. It is home to national cultural institutions such as the National Museum of Scotland, the National Library of Scotland and the Scottish National Gallery. The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1582 and now one of three in the city, is considered one of the best research institutions in the world, most recently placing 15th in the QS World University Rankings for 2023. The city is also known for the Edinburgh International Festival and the Fringe, the latter being the world's largest annual international arts festival. Historic sites in Edinburgh include Edinburgh Castle, the Palace of Holyroodhouse, the churches of St. Giles, Greyfriars and the Canongate, and the extensive Georgian New Town built in the 18th/19th centuries. Edinburgh's Old Town and New Town together are listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, which has been managed by Edinburgh World Heritage since 1999.

Freebase

  1. Edinburgh

    Edinburgh is the capital city of Scotland, situated on the southern shore of the Firth of Forth. With a population of 495,360 in 2011, it is the largest settlement in Lothian and lies at the centre of a larger urban zone of approximately 850,000 people. While the town originally formed on the ridge descending from the Castle Rock, the modern city is often said to be built on seven hills. From its prehistoric roots as a hillfort, following periods of Celtic and Germanic influence, Edinburgh became part of the Kingdom of Scotland during the 10th century. With burgh charters granted by David I and Robert the Bruce, Edinburgh grew through the Middle Ages as Scotland’s biggest merchant town. By the time of the European Renaissance and the reign of James IV it was well established as Scotland's capital. The 16th century Scottish Reformation and 18th century Scottish Enlightenment were formative periods in the history of the city, with Edinburgh playing a central role in both. While political power shifted to London following the Treaty of Union in 1707, with devolution in 1997 the city has seen the return of a Scottish parliament. Edinburgh has a high proportion of independent schools, one college and four universities. The University of Edinburgh is the biggest university in Scotland and ranked 21st in the world. These institutions help provide a highly educated population and a dynamic economy. Edinburgh has the UK's strongest economy outside London and was named European Best Large City of the Future for Foreign Direct Investment by fDi Magazine in 2012/13.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Edinburgh

    the capital of Scotland, on the Firth of Forth, picturesquely situated amid surrounding hills; derives its name from Edwin, king of Northumbria in the 7th century; was created a burgh in 1329 by Robert the Bruce, and recognised as the capital in the 15th century, under the Stuarts; it has absorbed in its growth adjoining municipalities; is noted as an educational centre; is the seat of the Supreme Courts; has a university, castle, and royal palace, and the old Scotch Parliament House, now utilised by the Law Courts; brewing and printing are the chief industries, but the upper classes of the citizens are for the most part either professional people or living in retirement.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. edinburgh

    The metropolis of Scotland, situated about 11⁄2 miles from the Firth of Forth. It was taken by the Anglo-Saxons in 482; retaken by the Picts in 695; city fortified and castle rebuilt, 1074; besieged by Donald Bane, 1093. The city was taken by the English in 1296; surrendered to Edward III. in 1356. It was burnt by Richard II., 1385, and by Henry IV., 1401. A British force landed from a fleet of 200 ships, in 1544, and burned Edinburgh. The castle surrendered to Cromwell in 1650. The young Pretender occupied Holyrood September 17, 1745, and the battle of Preston Pans took place September 21, 1745.

Etymology and Origins

  1. Edinburgh

    The fortress or burgh built by Edwin, King of Northumbria. The Scots called it Dunedin.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Edinburgh' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #1713

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Edinburgh' in Written Corpus Frequency: #2805

How to pronounce Edinburgh?

How to say Edinburgh in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Edinburgh in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Edinburgh in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of Edinburgh in a Sentence

  1. Gordon MacIntyre-Kemp:

    I am already hearing rumors from contacts in London that big financial companies are instructing lawyers to look at Edinburgh as a hub.

  2. Prince Phillip:

    It looks as if it was put in by an Indian. (looking at an old-fashioned fuse box while on a factory tour near Edinburgh)

  3. Buckingham Palace:

    After careful consideration The Duke of Edinburgh has taken the decision to voluntarily surrender his driving licence.

  4. Kensington Palace:

    The Queen, The Duke of Edinburgh, The Prince of Wales, The Duchess of Cornwall, Prince Harry and members of both families have been informed and are delighted with the news, her Royal Highness and her child are both doing well.

  5. Gregory Nunn:

    The most touching epitaph I ever encountered was on the tombstone of the printer of Edinburgh. It said simply: He kept down the cost and set the type right.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Edinburgh#1#4768#10000

Translations for Edinburgh

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

Get even more translations for Edinburgh »

Translation

Find a translation for the Edinburgh definition in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Português (Portuguese)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • العربية (Arabic)
  • Français (French)
  • Русский (Russian)
  • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • 한국어 (Korean)
  • עברית (Hebrew)
  • Gaeilge (Irish)
  • Українська (Ukrainian)
  • اردو (Urdu)
  • Magyar (Hungarian)
  • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italiano (Italian)
  • தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Türkçe (Turkish)
  • తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Čeština (Czech)
  • Polski (Polish)
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Românește (Romanian)
  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

Word of the Day

Would you like us to send you a FREE new word definition delivered to your inbox daily?

Please enter your email address:


Discuss these Edinburgh definitions with the community:

0 Comments

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "Edinburgh." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2023. Web. 6 Feb. 2023. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/Edinburgh>.

    Are we missing a good definition for Edinburgh? Don't keep it to yourself...

    Image or illustration of

    Edinburgh

    Credit »

    Browse Definitions.net

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Chrome

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Firefox

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Quiz

    Are you a words master?

    »
    separate or cut with a tool, such as a sharp instrument
    • A. rumpus
    • B. cleave
    • C. abide
    • D. emanate

    Nearby & related entries:

    Alternative searches for Edinburgh: