What does Earth mean?

Definitions for Earth
ɜrθEarth

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Earth.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Earth, earth, world, globe(noun)

    the 3rd planet from the sun; the planet we live on

    "the Earth moves around the sun"; "he sailed around the world"

  2. earth, ground(noun)

    the loose soft material that makes up a large part of the land surface

    "they dug into the earth outside the church"

  3. land, dry land, earth, ground, solid ground, terra firma(noun)

    the solid part of the earth's surface

    "the plane turned away from the sea and moved back over land"; "the earth shook for several minutes"; "he dropped the logs on the ground"

  4. Earth, earth(noun)

    the abode of mortals (as contrasted with Heaven or Hell)

    "it was hell on earth"

  5. earth(noun)

    once thought to be one of four elements composing the universe (Empedocles)

  6. worldly concern, earthly concern, world, earth(noun)

    the concerns of this life as distinguished from heaven and the afterlife

    "they consider the church to be independent of the world"

  7. ground, earth(verb)

    a connection between an electrical device and a large conducting body, such as the earth (which is taken to be at zero voltage)

  8. earth(verb)

    hide in the earth like a hunted animal

  9. earth(verb)

    connect to the earth

    "earth the circuit"

Wiktionary

  1. earth(Noun)

    Soil.

    This is good earth for growing potatoes.

    Etymology: From erthe, from eorþe, from erþō (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Er(de)/Ir(de), aarde, Erde, jord), related to *erwōn 'earth' (compare ear, ero, jǫrfi 'gravel'), from er- (compare úr 'earth', Tocharian B yare 'gravel', Ancient Greek éras 'earth', éraze 'on the ground', varr, երկիր, երկին).

  2. earth(Noun)

    Any general rock-based material.

    She sighed when the plane's wheels finally touched earth.

    Etymology: From erthe, from eorþe, from erþō (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Er(de)/Ir(de), aarde, Erde, jord), related to *erwōn 'earth' (compare ear, ero, jǫrfi 'gravel'), from er- (compare úr 'earth', Tocharian B yare 'gravel', Ancient Greek éras 'earth', éraze 'on the ground', varr, երկիր, երկին).

  3. earth(Noun)

    The ground, land (as opposed to the sky or sea).

    Birds are of the sky, not of the earth.

    Etymology: From erthe, from eorþe, from erþō (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Er(de)/Ir(de), aarde, Erde, jord), related to *erwōn 'earth' (compare ear, ero, jǫrfi 'gravel'), from er- (compare úr 'earth', Tocharian B yare 'gravel', Ancient Greek éras 'earth', éraze 'on the ground', varr, երկիր, երկին).

  4. earth(Noun)

    A connection electrically to the earth ( ground); on equipment: a terminal connected in that manner.

    Etymology: From erthe, from eorþe, from erþō (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Er(de)/Ir(de), aarde, Erde, jord), related to *erwōn 'earth' (compare ear, ero, jǫrfi 'gravel'), from er- (compare úr 'earth', Tocharian B yare 'gravel', Ancient Greek éras 'earth', éraze 'on the ground', varr, երկիր, երկին).

  5. earth(Noun)

    A fox's home or lair.

    Etymology: From erthe, from eorþe, from erþō (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Er(de)/Ir(de), aarde, Erde, jord), related to *erwōn 'earth' (compare ear, ero, jǫrfi 'gravel'), from er- (compare úr 'earth', Tocharian B yare 'gravel', Ancient Greek éras 'earth', éraze 'on the ground', varr, երկիր, երկին).

  6. earth(Noun)

    The world of our current life (as opposed to heaven or an afterlife).

    Etymology: From erthe, from eorþe, from erþō (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Er(de)/Ir(de), aarde, Erde, jord), related to *erwōn 'earth' (compare ear, ero, jǫrfi 'gravel'), from er- (compare úr 'earth', Tocharian B yare 'gravel', Ancient Greek éras 'earth', éraze 'on the ground', varr, երկիր, երկին).

  7. earth(Noun)

    One of the four basic elements (see Wikipedia article on the Classical elements).

    Etymology: From erthe, from eorþe, from erþō (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Er(de)/Ir(de), aarde, Erde, jord), related to *erwōn 'earth' (compare ear, ero, jǫrfi 'gravel'), from er- (compare úr 'earth', Tocharian B yare 'gravel', Ancient Greek éras 'earth', éraze 'on the ground', varr, երկիր, երկին).

  8. earth(Noun)

    One of the five basic elements (see Wikipedia article on the Classical elements).

    Etymology: From erthe, from eorþe, from erþō (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Er(de)/Ir(de), aarde, Erde, jord), related to *erwōn 'earth' (compare ear, ero, jǫrfi 'gravel'), from er- (compare úr 'earth', Tocharian B yare 'gravel', Ancient Greek éras 'earth', éraze 'on the ground', varr, երկիր, երկին).

  9. earth(Noun)

    One of the five basic elements (see Wikipedia article on the Five Elements).

    Etymology: From erthe, from eorþe, from erþō (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Er(de)/Ir(de), aarde, Erde, jord), related to *erwōn 'earth' (compare ear, ero, jǫrfi 'gravel'), from er- (compare úr 'earth', Tocharian B yare 'gravel', Ancient Greek éras 'earth', éraze 'on the ground', varr, երկիր, երկին).

  10. earth(Verb)

    To connect electrically to the earth.

    That noise is because the amplifier is not properly earthed.

    Etymology: From erthe, from eorþe, from erþō (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Er(de)/Ir(de), aarde, Erde, jord), related to *erwōn 'earth' (compare ear, ero, jǫrfi 'gravel'), from er- (compare úr 'earth', Tocharian B yare 'gravel', Ancient Greek éras 'earth', éraze 'on the ground', varr, երկիր, երկին).

  11. earth(Verb)

    To bury.

    Etymology: From erthe, from eorþe, from erþō (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Er(de)/Ir(de), aarde, Erde, jord), related to *erwōn 'earth' (compare ear, ero, jǫrfi 'gravel'), from er- (compare úr 'earth', Tocharian B yare 'gravel', Ancient Greek éras 'earth', éraze 'on the ground', varr, երկիր, երկին).

  12. earth(ProperNoun)

    Our planet, third out from the Sun; see main entry Earth.

    The astronauts saw the earth from the porthole.

    Etymology: From erthe, from eorþe, from erþō (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Er(de)/Ir(de), aarde, Erde, jord), related to *erwōn 'earth' (compare ear, ero, jǫrfi 'gravel'), from er- (compare úr 'earth', Tocharian B yare 'gravel', Ancient Greek éras 'earth', éraze 'on the ground', varr, երկիր, երկին).

  13. Earth(ProperNoun)

    The third planet in order from the Sun, upon which humans live. Represented in astronomy and astrology by u2641 and u2295.

    The astronauts saw the earth from the porthole.

    Etymology: From erthe, from eorþe, from erþō (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Er(de)/Ir(de), aarde, Erde, jord), related to *erwōn 'earth' (compare ear, ero, jǫrfi 'gravel'), from er- (compare úr 'earth', Tocharian B yare 'gravel', Ancient Greek éras 'earth', éraze 'on the ground', varr, երկիր, երկին).

Wikipedia

  1. Earth

    Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbor life. According to radiometric dating and other evidence, Earth formed over 4.5 billion years ago. Earth's gravity interacts with other objects in space, especially the Sun and the Moon, which is Earth's only natural satellite. Earth orbits around the Sun in 365.256 days, a period known as an Earth sidereal year. During this time, Earth rotates about its axis about 366.256 times.Earth's axis of rotation is tilted with respect to its orbital plane, producing seasons on Earth. The gravitational interaction between Earth and the Moon causes tides, stabilizes Earth's orientation on its axis, and gradually slows its rotation. Earth is the densest planet in the Solar System and the largest and most massive of the four rocky planets. Earth's outer layer (lithosphere) is divided into several rigid tectonic plates that migrate across the surface over many millions of years. About 71% of Earth's surface is covered with water, mostly by oceans. The remaining 29% is land consisting of continents and islands that together contain many lakes, rivers and other fresh water, which, together with the oceans, constitute the hydrosphere. The majority of Earth's polar regions are covered in ice, including the Antarctic ice sheet and the sea ice of the Arctic ice pack. Earth's interior remains active with a solid iron inner core, a liquid outer core that generates Earth's magnetic field, and a convecting mantle that drives plate tectonics. Within the first billion years of Earth's history, life appeared in the oceans and began to affect Earth's atmosphere and surface, leading to the proliferation of anaerobic and, later, aerobic organisms. Some geological evidence indicates that life may have arisen as early as 4.1 billion years ago. Since then, the combination of Earth's distance from the Sun, physical properties and geological history have allowed life to evolve and thrive. In the history of life on Earth, biodiversity has gone through long periods of expansion, occasionally punctuated by mass extinctions. Over 99% of all species that ever lived on Earth are extinct. Estimates of the number of species on Earth today vary widely; most species have not been described. Over 7.7 billion humans live on Earth and depend on its biosphere and natural resources for their survival. Politically, the world has around 200 sovereign states.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Earth(noun)

    the globe or planet which we inhabit; the world, in distinction from the sun, moon, or stars. Also, this world as the dwelling place of mortals, in distinction from the dwelling place of spirits

    Etymology: [From Ear to plow.]

  2. Earth(noun)

    the solid materials which make up the globe, in distinction from the air or water; the dry land

    Etymology: [From Ear to plow.]

  3. Earth(noun)

    the softer inorganic matter composing part of the surface of the globe, in distinction from the firm rock; soil of all kinds, including gravel, clay, loam, and the like; sometimes, soil favorable to the growth of plants; the visible surface of the globe; the ground; as, loose earth; rich earth

    Etymology: [From Ear to plow.]

  4. Earth(noun)

    a part of this globe; a region; a country; land

    Etymology: [From Ear to plow.]

  5. Earth(noun)

    worldly things, as opposed to spiritual things; the pursuits, interests, and allurements of this life

    Etymology: [From Ear to plow.]

  6. Earth(noun)

    the people on the globe

    Etymology: [From Ear to plow.]

  7. Earth(noun)

    any earthy-looking metallic oxide, as alumina, glucina, zirconia, yttria, and thoria

    Etymology: [From Ear to plow.]

  8. Earth(noun)

    a similar oxide, having a slight alkaline reaction, as lime, magnesia, strontia, baryta

    Etymology: [From Ear to plow.]

  9. Earth(noun)

    a hole in the ground, where an animal hides himself; as, the earth of a fox

    Etymology: [From Ear to plow.]

  10. Earth(verb)

    to hide, or cause to hide, in the earth; to chase into a burrow or den

    Etymology: [From Ear to plow.]

  11. Earth(verb)

    to cover with earth or mold; to inter; to bury; -- sometimes with up

    Etymology: [From Ear to plow.]

  12. Earth(verb)

    to burrow

    Etymology: [From Ear to plow.]

  13. Earth(noun)

    a plowing

    Etymology: [From Ear to plow.]

Freebase

  1. Earth

    Earth is the third planet from the Sun, and the densest and fifth-largest of the eight planets in the Solar System. It is also the largest of the Solar System's four terrestrial planets. It is sometimes referred to as the world or the Blue Planet. Earth formed approximately 4.54 billion years ago, and life appeared on its surface within its first billion years. Earth's biosphere then significantly altered the atmospheric and other basic physical conditions, which enabled the proliferation of organisms as well as the formation of the ozone layer, which together with Earth's magnetic field blocked harmful solar radiation, and permitted formerly ocean-confined life to move safely to land. The physical properties of the Earth, as well as its geological history and orbit, have allowed life to persist. Estimates on how much longer the planet will be able to continue to support life range from 500 million years, to as long as 2.3 billion years. Earth's lithosphere is divided into several rigid segments, or tectonic plates, that migrate across the surface over periods of many millions of years. About 71% of the surface is covered by salt water oceans, with the remainder consisting of continents and islands which together have many lakes and other sources of water that contribute to the hydrosphere. Earth's poles are mostly covered with ice that is the solid ice of the Antarctic ice sheet and the sea ice that is the polar ice packs. The planet's interior remains active, with a solid iron inner core, a liquid outer core that generates the magnetic field, and a thick layer of relatively solid mantle.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Earth

    ėrth, n. the name applied to the third planet in order from the sun: the matter on the surface of the globe: soil: dry land, as opposed to sea: the world: the inhabitants of the world: dirt: dead matter: the human body: a fox's hole: (pl.) the name applied by the alchemists and earlier chemists to certain substances now known to be oxides of metal, which were distinguished by being infusible, and by insolubility in water.—v.t. to hide or cause to hide in the earth: to bury.—v.i. to burrow: to hide.—ns. Earth′-bag, a sack of earth used in fortifications; Earth′-bath, a bath of earth or mud; Earth′-board, the board of a plough, or other implement, that turns over the earth.—adjs. Earth′-born, born from or on the earth; Earth′-bound, bound or held by the earth, as a tree; Earth′-bred, mean, grovelling.—n. Earth′-clos′et, a system consisting of the application of earth to the deodorisation of fæcal matters.—adjs. Earth′-creā′ted, made of earth; Earth′en, made of earth or clay: earthly.—ns. Earth′enware, crockery; Earth′-fall, a landslide.—adj. Earth′-fed, contented with earthly things.—ns. Earth′flax, asbestos; Earth′-hog (see Aardvark); Earth′-house, the name given to the ancient underground dwellings in Ireland and Scotland, also called Picts' houses; Earth′-hung′er, the passion for acquiring land; Earth′iness; Earth′liness; Earth′ling, a dweller on the earth.—adjs. Earth′ly, belonging to the earth: vile: worldly; Earth′ly-mind′ed, having the mind intent on earthly things.—ns. Earth′ly-mind′edness; Earth′-nut, the popular name of certain tuberous roots growing underground; Earth′-pea, the hog-peanut; Earth′-plate, a buried plate of metal forming the earth-connection of a telegraph-wire, lightning-conductor, &c.; Earth′quake, a quaking or shaking of the earth: a heaving of the ground; Earth′-shine, the faint light visible on the part of the moon not illuminated by the sun; Earth′-trem′or, a slight earthquake.—adv. Earth′ward, toward the earth.—ns. Earth′work, a fortification of earth; Earth′-worm, the common worm: a mean person, a poor creature.—adj. Earth′y, consisting of, relating to, or resembling earth: inhabiting the earth: gross: unrefined. [A.S. eorthe; cf. Dut. aarde, Ger. erde.]

The Roycroft Dictionary

  1. earth

    1. A small bean-shaped planet, full of noise, nonsense and noddies, created in order to swell the pockets of politicians. 2. A blister produced by the constant abrasion of motion against space.

The Standard Electrical Dictionary

  1. Earth

    (a) The earth is arbitrarily taken as of zero electrostatic potential. Surfaces in such condition that their potential is unchanged when connected to the earth are said to be of zero potential. All other surfaces are discharged when connected to the earth, whose potential, for the purposes of man at least, never changes. (b) As a magnetic field of force the intensity of the earth's field is about one-half a line of force per square centimeter. (c) The accidental grounding of a telegraph line is termed an earth, as a dead, total, partial, or intermittent earth, describing the extent and character of the trouble. [Transcriber's note: Fallen power lines can produce voltage gradients on the earth's surface that make walking in the area dangerous, as in hundreds of volts per foot. Lightning may be associated with substantial changes in the static ground potential.]

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. EARTH

    A solid substance, much desired by the seasick.

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. earth

    One of the primary planets, and the third in order from the sun.

Editors Contribution

  1. earth

    A form of living energy and matter.

    The earth is a living form of energy and matter combined.

    Submitted by MaryC on April 26, 2020  
  2. earth

    A living planet.

    We live on planet earth which is only one planet in the universe that we know of at this moment of time, we are intelligent and know within our soul there is more to this universe.

    Submitted by MaryC on January 26, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. earth

    The earth symbol -- In this Symbols.com article you will learn about the meaning of the earth symbol and its characteristic.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Earth' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #1046

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Earth' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1291

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Earth' in Nouns Frequency: #466

Anagrams for Earth »

  1. hater, heart, rathe, rehat, Terah

How to pronounce Earth?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say Earth in sign language?

  1. earth

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Earth in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Earth in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of Earth in a Sentence

  1. Nikoloz Doborjginidze:

    If were going to live on Mars one day, Georgia needs to contribute, our ancestors brought wine to Earth, so we can do the same to Mars.

  2. RVM:

    There is nobody else on earth like you and me. Let us be who we are meant to be. #Inspiration #motivation #RVM

  3. Mehmet Murat ildan:

    Archimedes once said that ‘Give me where to stand, and I will move the earth.’ There is a much more difficult task than this: To try to lift an ignorant up from where he stands, because he is heavily chained to the stupidity!

  4. Robert Bonhomme:

    Rose Goodhall is simply the sweetest, most down to Earth model I've ever had the joy of working with on any project.

  5. Donald Trump:

    I saw something that no place on Earth could have handled more beautifully, more humanely than New York, the people in New York fought and fought and fought. We saw more death and even the smell of death and it was with us for months.

Images & Illustrations of Earth

  1. EarthEarthEarthEarthEarth

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Earth#1#1333#10000

Translations for Earth

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

Get even more translations for Earth »

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