What does Drama mean?

Definitions for Drama
ˈdrɑ mə, ˈdræm əDra·ma

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Drama.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. play, drama, dramatic play(noun)

    a dramatic work intended for performance by actors on a stage

    "he wrote several plays but only one was produced on Broadway"

  2. drama, dramatic event(noun)

    an episode that is turbulent or highly emotional

  3. drama(noun)

    the literary genre of works intended for the theater

  4. drama(noun)

    the quality of being arresting or highly emotional

Wiktionary

  1. drama(Noun)

    A composition, normally in prose, telling a story and intended to be represented by actors impersonating the characters and speaking the dialogue

    Etymology: From δρᾶμα, from δράω

  2. drama(Noun)

    Such a work for television, radio or the cinema (usually one that is not a comedy)

    Etymology: From δρᾶμα, from δράω

  3. drama(Noun)

    Theatrical plays in general

    Etymology: From δρᾶμα, from δράω

  4. drama(Noun)

    A dramatic situation in real life

    Etymology: From δρᾶμα, from δράω

  5. drama(Noun)

    Rumor, lying or exaggerated reaction to life events; melodrama; an angry dispute or scene; intrigue or spiteful interpersonal maneuvering.

    Etymology: From δρᾶμα, from δράω

  6. Drama(ProperNoun)

    A town in Greece.

    Etymology: From δρᾶμα, from δράω

Webster Dictionary

  1. Drama(noun)

    a composition, in prose or poetry, accommodated to action, and intended to exhibit a picture of human life, or to depict a series of grave or humorous actions of more than ordinary interest, tending toward some striking result. It is commonly designed to be spoken and represented by actors on the stage

    Etymology: [L. drama, Gr. dra^ma, fr. dra^n to do, act; cf. Lith. daryti.]

  2. Drama(noun)

    a series of real events invested with a dramatic unity and interest

    Etymology: [L. drama, Gr. dra^ma, fr. dra^n to do, act; cf. Lith. daryti.]

  3. Drama(noun)

    dramatic composition and the literature pertaining to or illustrating it; dramatic literature

    Etymology: [L. drama, Gr. dra^ma, fr. dra^n to do, act; cf. Lith. daryti.]

Freebase

  1. Drama

    Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance. The term comes from a Greek word meaning "action", which is derived from the verb meaning "to do" or "to act". The enactment of drama in theatre, performed by actors on a stage before an audience, presupposes collaborative modes of production and a collective form of reception. The structure of dramatic texts, unlike other forms of literature, is directly influenced by this collaborative production and collective reception. The early modern tragedy Hamlet by Shakespeare and the classical Athenian tragedy Oedipus the King by Sophocles are among the masterpieces of the art of drama. A modern example is Long Day's Journey into Night by Eugene O’Neill. The two masks associated with drama represent the traditional generic division between comedy and tragedy. They are symbols of the ancient Greek Muses, Thalia and Melpomene. Thalia was the Muse of comedy, while Melpomene was the Muse of tragedy. Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and the lyrical modes ever since Aristotle's Poetics —the earliest work of dramatic theory.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Drama

    dram′a, n. a story of human life and action represented by actors imitating the language, dress, &c. of the original characters: a composition intended to be represented on the stage: dramatic literature: theatrical entertainment: a series of deeply interesting events.—adjs. Dramatic, -al, belonging to the drama: appropriate to or in the form of a drama: with the force and vividness of the drama.—adv. Dramat′ically.—n. Dramat′icism.—adj. Dram′atīsable.—n. Dramatisā′tion, the act of dramatising: the dramatised version of a novel or story.—v.i. Dram′atīse, to compose in, or turn into, the form of a drama or play.—n. Dram′atist, a writer of plays.—Dram′atis persō′næ (-ē), the characters of a drama or play. [L.,—Gr. drama, dramatosdraein, to do.]

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Drama

    A composition in prose or verse presenting in dialogue or pantomime a story involving various characters, usually intended to be acted on a stage and to be regarded as a form of entertainment. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)

Suggested Resources

  1. drama

    Song lyrics by drama -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by drama on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Drama' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2827

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Drama' in Written Corpus Frequency: #4544

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Drama' in Nouns Frequency: #1174

How to pronounce Drama?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say Drama in sign language?

  1. drama

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Drama in Chaldean Numerology is: 3

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Drama in Pythagorean Numerology is: 1

Examples of Drama in a Sentence

  1. Alejandro Soberon:

    I think this series especially had an effect on ladies, who found this racing concept extremely boring until they discovered there was drama behind, there was a different narrative, and I think that helped, it's not so distant any more, you can touch it, it's more human.

  2. Iran Clinton:

    Some of President Obama's aides in the White House were swept up in the drama and idealism of the moment.

  3. Jockey Club:

    Horseracing is the second biggest spectator sport in Britain and we want to ensure a new generation of fans are constantly discovering the drama and excitement of its stories.

  4. Gavin Andresen:

    Ask me in six months; I don't trust my own judgment right now after all the drama.

  5. Richard Lowenstein:

    Other documentaries had been made, there was a drama series in Australia ... and nothing I recognized in the character even in the documentaries or the drama reminded me of anything I knew about the real person, there should be a proper record instead of these rumors and tabloid headlines.

Images & Illustrations of Drama

  1. DramaDramaDramaDramaDrama

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Drama#1#3570#10000

Translations for Drama

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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