What does Dartmouth mean?

Definitions for Dartmouth
ˈdɑrt məθDart·mouth

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Dartmouth.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Dartmouth College, Dartmouthnoun

    a college in New Hampshire

Wiktionary

  1. Dartmouthnoun

    A port in Devon, England

    Etymology: So called as it is at the mouth of the River Dart.

Freebase

  1. Dartmouth

    Dartmouth founded in 1750, is a former city and planning area of the Halifax Regional Municipality, Nova Scotia. Located on the eastern shore of Halifax Harbour, Dartmouth has been nicknamed the City of Lakes after the large number of lakes located in the city. On April 1, 1996, the provincial government amalgamated all the municipalities within the boundaries of Halifax County into a single-tier regional government named Halifax Regional Municipality. While Dartmouth and its neighbouring city of Halifax, the town of Bedford and the Municipality of the County of Halifax were dissolved at this time, the former city forms part of the urban core of the larger regional municipality and is officially labelled the "capital district" by the HRM government. At the time that the City of Dartmouth was dissolved, the provincial government altered its status to a separate community to Halifax however its status as part of the metropolitan "Halifax" urban core existed prior to municipal reorganisation in 1996. Dartmouth is still the geographic name that is used by all levels of government for mapping, 9-1-1, planning, and is recognised by the Halifax Regional Municipality as a place-name for civic addressing. The official place name did not change due to the confusion with similar street names and planning set out by the "City of Dartmouth" and public pressure. Today the same development planning for Downtown Dartmouth and the rest of the community is still in force as well as specific bylaws created prior to April 1, 1996.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. dartmouth

    A seaport town of England, in Devonshire; it was burnt by the French in the reigns of Richard I. and Henry IV. In a third attempt (1404) the invaders were defeated by the inhabitants, assisted by the valor of the women. In the war of the Parliament, Dartmouth was taken, after a siege of four weeks, by Prince Maurice, who garrisoned the place for the king (1643); but it was retaken by Gen. Fairfax by storm in 1646.

Etymology and Origins

  1. Dartmouth

    On the estuary of the River Dart.

Matched Categories

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How to say Dartmouth in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Dartmouth in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Dartmouth in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of Dartmouth in a Sentence

  1. Foundation Program Officer Alex Morey:

    Dartmouth’s fresh commitment to ‘rebuilding trust’ among the students it unfairly accused in this case should start with promising a fair process to all future students who may find themselves facing a similar misconduct allegation, when it comes to trust, due process provides it: Giving everyone involved confidence that when a school reaches a result in a misconduct investigation, it’s a fair one.

  2. Diana Lawrence:

    Dartmouth is and will remain committed to robust debate, respectful dialogue, and discussion, with the understanding that such interactions will sometimes be difficult or disagreeable, as an academic community, we are committed to free speech and open inquiry in all matters. Our students, faculty, and staff enjoy the freedom to speak, write, listen and challenge ideas in pursuit of better learning and understanding.

Images & Illustrations of Dartmouth

  1. DartmouthDartmouthDartmouthDartmouthDartmouth

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Translations for Dartmouth

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