What does Control mean?

Definitions for Control
kənˈtroʊlCon·trol

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Control.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. controlnoun

    power to direct or determine

    "under control"

  2. controlnoun

    a relation of constraint of one entity (thing or person or group) by another

    "measures for the control of disease"; "they instituted controls over drinking on campus"

  3. controlnoun

    (physiology) regulation or maintenance of a function or action or reflex etc

    "the timing and control of his movements were unimpaired"; "he had lost control of his sphincters"

  4. control condition, controlnoun

    a standard against which other conditions can be compared in a scientific experiment

    "the control condition was inappropriate for the conclusions he wished to draw"

  5. controlnoun

    the activity of managing or exerting control over something

    "the control of the mob by the police was admirable"

  6. dominance, ascendance, ascendence, ascendancy, ascendency, controlnoun

    the state that exists when one person or group has power over another

    "her apparent dominance of her husband was really her attempt to make him pay attention to her"

  7. restraint, controlnoun

    discipline in personal and social activities

    "he was a model of polite restraint"; "she never lost control of herself"

  8. command, control, masterynoun

    great skillfulness and knowledge of some subject or activity

    "a good command of French"

  9. control, controllernoun

    a mechanism that controls the operation of a machine

    "the speed controller on his turntable was not working properly"; "I turned the controls over to her"

  10. controlnoun

    a spiritual agency that is assumed to assist the medium during a seance

  11. controlverb

    the economic policy of controlling or limiting or curbing prices or wages etc.

    "they wanted to repeal all the legislation that imposed economic controls"

  12. control, commandverb

    exercise authoritative control or power over

    "control the budget"; "Command the military forces"

  13. control, hold in, hold, contain, check, curb, moderateverb

    lessen the intensity of; temper; hold in restraint; hold or keep within limits

    "moderate your alcohol intake"; "hold your tongue"; "hold your temper"; "control your anger"

  14. operate, controlverb

    handle and cause to function

    "do not operate machinery after imbibing alcohol"; "control the lever"

  15. manipulate, keep in line, controlverb

    control (others or oneself) or influence skillfully, usually to one's advantage

    "She manipulates her boss"; "She is a very controlling mother and doesn't let her children grow up"; "The teacher knew how to keep the class in line"; "she keeps in line"

  16. control, verifyverb

    check or regulate (a scientific experiment) by conducting a parallel experiment or comparing with another standard

    "Are you controlling for the temperature?"

  17. controlverb

    verify by using a duplicate register for comparison

    "control an account"

  18. see, check, insure, see to it, ensure, control, ascertain, assureverb

    be careful or certain to do something; make certain of something

    "He verified that the valves were closed"; "See that the curtains are closed"; "control the quality of the product"

  19. master, controlverb

    have a firm understanding or knowledge of; be on top of

    "Do you control these data?"

GCIDE

  1. Controlnoun

    (Technology) in research, an object or subject used in an experimental procedure, which is treated identically to the primary subject of the experiment, except for the omission of the specific treatment or conditions whose effect is being investigated. If the control is a group of living organisms, as is common in medical research, it is called the control group. For most experimental procedures, the results are not considered valid and reliable unless a proper control experiment is performed. There are various types of control used in experimental science, and often several groups of subjects serve as controls, being subjected to different variations of the experimental procedure, or controlling for several variables being tested. When the effects caused by an experimental treatment are not consistent and obvious, statistical analysis of the results is typically used to determine if there are any significant differences between the effects of different experimental conditions.

    Etymology: [F. contrle a counter register, contr. fr. contr-rle; contre (L. contra) + rle roll, catalogue. See Counter and Roll, and cf. Counterroll.]

  2. Controlnoun

    (Technology) the part of an experimental procedure in which the controls are subjected to the experimental conditions.

    Etymology: [F. contrle a counter register, contr. fr. contr-rle; contre (L. contra) + rle roll, catalogue. See Counter and Roll, and cf. Counterroll.]

  3. Controlnoun

    the group of technical specialists exercising control by remote communications over a distant operation, such as a space flight; as, the American Mission Control for manned flights is located in Houston.

    Etymology: [F. contrle a counter register, contr. fr. contr-rle; contre (L. contra) + rle roll, catalogue. See Counter and Roll, and cf. Counterroll.]

  4. Controlverb

    to assure the validity of an experimental procedure by using a control.

    Etymology: [F. contrler, fr. contrle.]

Wiktionary

  1. controlnoun

    Influence or authority over.

    The government has complete control over the situation.

    Etymology: From conterrolle, from contrerole, from contrarotulum, from + rotulus, rotula, diminutive of rota.

  2. controlnoun

    A separate group or subject in an experiment against which the results are compared where the primary variable is low or nonexistence.

    Etymology: From conterrolle, from contrerole, from contrarotulum, from + rotulus, rotula, diminutive of rota.

  3. controlnoun

    The method and means of governing the performance of any apparatus, machine or system, such as a lever, handle or button.

    Etymology: From conterrolle, from contrerole, from contrarotulum, from + rotulus, rotula, diminutive of rota.

  4. controlnoun

    A security mechanism, policy, or procedure that can counter system attack, reduce risks, and resolve vulnerabilities, synonymous with safeguard and counter-measure.

    Etymology: From conterrolle, from contrerole, from contrarotulum, from + rotulus, rotula, diminutive of rota.

  5. controlnoun

    restraint or ability to contain one's emotions, or self-control.

    Etymology: From conterrolle, from contrerole, from contrarotulum, from + rotulus, rotula, diminutive of rota.

  6. controlnoun

    An interface element that a computer user interacts with, such as a window or a text box.

    Etymology: From conterrolle, from contrerole, from contrarotulum, from + rotulus, rotula, diminutive of rota.

  7. controlverb

    To exercise influence over, to suggest or dictate the behavior of, oversit.

    With a simple remote, he could control the toy truck.

    Etymology: From conterrolle, from contrerole, from contrarotulum, from + rotulus, rotula, diminutive of rota.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Controlnoun

    a duplicate book, register, or account, kept to correct or check another account or register; a counter register

    Etymology: [F. contrler, fr. contrle.]

  2. Controlnoun

    that which serves to check, restrain, or hinder; restraint

    Etymology: [F. contrler, fr. contrle.]

  3. Controlnoun

    power or authority to check or restrain; restraining or regulating influence; superintendence; government; as, children should be under parental control

    Etymology: [F. contrler, fr. contrle.]

  4. Controlverb

    to check by a counter register or duplicate account; to prove by counter statements; to confute

    Etymology: [F. contrler, fr. contrle.]

  5. Controlverb

    to exercise restraining or governing influence over; to check; to counteract; to restrain; to regulate; to govern; to overpower

    Etymology: [F. contrler, fr. contrle.]

Freebase

  1. Control

    In linguistics, control is a construction where the understood subject of a given predicate is determined by some expression in context. Stereotypical instances of control involve verbs. A superordinate verb "controls" a subordinate, non-finite verb. Control was intensively studied in the Government and Binding framework in the 1980s, and much of the terminology from that era is still used today. In the days of Transformational Grammar, control phenomena were discussed in terms of Equi-NP deletion. Control is often analyzed in terms of a null pronoun called PRO. Control is also related to raising, although there are important differences between control and raising. Most if not all languages have control constructions and these constructions tend to occur frequently.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Control

    kon-trōl′, n. restraint: authority: command.—v.t. to check: to restrain: to govern:—pr.p. contrōl′ling; pa.p. contrōlled′.—Formerly Comptroll′, Countrol′, Controul′.—adj. Control′lable, capable of, or subject to, control.—ns. Control′ler, Comptrol′ler, one who checks the accounts of others by a counter-roll; Control′lership; Control′ment, act or power of controlling: state of being controlled: control. [Fr. contrôle, from contre-rôle, a duplicate register—L. contra, against, rotulus, a roll.]

Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

  1. control

    1. Authority that may be less than full command exercised by a commander over part of the activities of subordinate or other organizations. 2. In mapping, charting, and photogrammetry, a collective term for a system of marks or objects on the Earth or on a map or a photograph, whose positions or elevations (or both) have been or will be determined. 3. Physical or psychological pressures exerted with the intent to assure that an agent or group will respond as directed. 4. An indicator governing the distribution and use of documents, information, or material. Such indicators are the subject of intelligence community agreement and are specifically defined in appropriate regulations. See also administrative control; operational control; tactical control.

Editors Contribution

  1. control

    The ability, authority and power to manage.

    They did control their weight by exercising and choosing a plant based diet.

    Submitted by MaryC on February 18, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. control

    Song lyrics by control -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by control on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Control' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #350

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Control' in Written Corpus Frequency: #940

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Control' in Nouns Frequency: #102

  4. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Control' in Verbs Frequency: #195

How to pronounce Control?

  1. Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Indian

How to say Control in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Control in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Control in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of Control in a Sentence

  1. William Jefferson Clinton:

    The fights I fought... cost a lot --the fight for the assault-weapons ban cost 20 members their seats in Congress. The NRA is the reason the Republicans control the House.

  2. Josh Zive:

    Having a truly independent foreign affiliate is harder than it sounds and many companies have found that it is difficult to keep personnel, equipment and operations segregated to the degree that the Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Asset Control requires.

  3. The Dhammapada:

    By rousing himself, by earnestness, by restraint and control the wise man may make for himself an island which no flood can overwhelm.

  4. Prashant Agarwal:

    Many a times in life you may encounter some situations and problems that may lead to make you feel depressed, isolated, frightened or anxious. These are merely some emotions that takes control over your mind and starts feeding you with negative thoughts where you may end up finding yourself completely manipulated by these feelings, which would eventually affect your life. But it's only you who can make yourself happy and sometimes you don't even know what you are capable of, unless you fight and face that particular situation on your own. Thus, embrace your journey, understand your emotions and build a courage to face it. One thing that you need to realize is that it's never an easy journey, and everything that you do may not lead to make you feel happy, pleasant or satisfied. The wisest investment you can do for yourself is to purge yourself away from all those feelings and thoughts which is pulling you back from your goal.

  5. Marcus Low:

    It leaves us with one less caregiver to be on assignment, and that leaves us short-staffed. Public health experts say testing delays present a major hurdle to reducing infections and tracking those who have been in close contact with a person who is positive for the virus. Thats why researchers are working to develop rapid tests that can be cheaply produced, self-administered and provide immediate, reliable results. For now, most tests to diagnose COVID-19 require laboratory processing, which means a built-in delay. Guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that states, as they lift final virus restrictions, have a turnaround time of less than two days. But its unclear whether states have access to detailed data showing whether they are meeting the CDC standard, including how long it takes to process tests at independent labs. Labs track their own turnaround times, but the CDC said data such as how long it takes for a test to get to a lab and for a provider to receive the result and notify the patient are not tracked. That makes it difficult to determine a meaningful average of what patients are experiencing in each state. In the absence of publicly available federal data, the AP earlier this month surveyed nine states that were experiencing a 14-day uptick in new positive cases, plus New York, which has had the most COVID-19 cases. The state lab in New York was taking up to three days to report results to patients. California officials said the statewide turnaround time was 48 to 72 hours, depending on the lab. In Utah, anecdotal information suggested that results took 24 to 72 hours. Most of the 10 states surveyed said they did not have data on turnaround times for commercial labs in their state, creating another information gap. Health experts said this was not unusual, that state health departments have not typically been responsible for tracking individual laboratory turnaround times. Its a good question of who should be responsible for tracking this information and providing it back to the public, said Kelly Wroblewski, director of infectious diseases with the Association of Public Health Laboratories. There are other factors that can cause delays, from the time of day the test is taken to whether a lab shuts down for the evening. Staffing issues and shortages of testing supplies also can slow the process. Even people visiting the same testing location can have widely different experiences. Earlier this month, Jeff Barnes, a music therapist in metro Atlanta, went to the same drive-thru testing location a week after his wife and two daughters. They were still waiting when he received his results the next day. Theirs wouldnt come for seven days. Barnes said he was concerned what a similar delay would mean if schools reopen in the fall. They are going to have to make it more efficient, Barnes said. If I knew (my daughter) was in a classroom with 20 kids and 10 of them had results pending, I dont know that I would send her. Until rapid tests are widely available, health experts say it will continue to take a day or two to get results under the best circumstances. That creates more opportunities for people who might be infected but feel fine to pass the virus along to others. In late April and May, the state lab in Alabama had trouble acquiring reagents, the chemical substances used to process tests. That led to intermittent delays in reporting results, up to five days from when the lab received the specimen, according to Dr. Karen Landers, assistant state health officer with the Alabama Department of Public Health. Those problems have since been resolved, and the lab now has a turnaround time between 24 and 72 hours from the time it receives samples. One of the largest commercial laboratories, Quest Diagnostics, recently reported its average turnaround time as one day for priority patients and two to three days for all other populations. The company said it expects increased demand to result in longer waits of more than thee days. Other countries face similar challenges. Wait times in China vary by city, from as little as one day in Shanghai to four days in Wuhan, where the virus first emerged. In Japan, tests usually yield results within two days. Mandatory tests, such as those at airports, often come out sooner, according to the health ministry. Results in India initially took around 24 hours. But as infections and testing increased, so did delays. Now results often take two to three days or as long as a week, depending on location. The nearly two-week wait in South Africa makes effective treatment nearly impossible.

Images & Illustrations of Control

  1. ControlControlControlControlControl

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Control#1#333#10000

Translations for Control

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

  • سيطرArabic
  • сдържаност, контролна група, власт, контролирам, управление, управлявам, самообладаниеBulgarian
  • controlar, controlCatalan, Valencian
  • řídit, nadvláda, ovládat, správa, kontrolaCzech
  • styre, kontrollereDanish
  • Kontrollgruppe, Kontrollelement, kontrollieren, Kontrolle, Steuerelement, steuernGerman
  • έλεγχος, ελέγχωGreek
  • kontroloEsperanto
  • contramedida, control, dirección, autodominio, patrón de comparación, controlar, manejo, organización, mando, administraciónSpanish
  • kontrollgrupp, võim, kontrollEstonian
  • kontrolatuBasque
  • itsehillintä, kontrolloida, hallita, ohjaus, hallinta, varmistaa, ohjata, vertailuryhmä, valvoaFinnish
  • contrôle, contrôlerFrench
  • srianadh, urlámhasIrish
  • srian, ceannsaichScottish Gaelic
  • controlarGalician
  • niyantranGujarati
  • לשלוטHebrew
  • niyantranHindi
  • kontwoleHaitian Creole
  • korlátoz, kontrollál, szabályozHungarian
  • kendali, mengendalikan, mengontrolIndonesian
  • comandi, influenzare, autorità, dirigere, controllare, comando, controlloItalian
  • 制御, コントロール, 支配, 操るJapanese
  • 조절하다, 통제, 조절, 통제하다, 제어Korean
  • kontrolKurdish
  • imperium, impero, imperator, teneo, controlLatin
  • whakamatuaMāori
  • kawalan, mengawal, menguasaiMalay
  • beheersing, controleren, besturen, controle, beheersen, invloedDutch
  • kontrollereNorwegian
  • zarządzać, kontrolka, sterować, samokontrola, kontrola, kontrolować, grupa kontrolna, nadzorowaćPolish
  • controlo, controlar, controlePortuguese
  • control, grup de control, comandă, element de control, grup de comparație, element de comandă, autoritate, mecanism de siguranțăRomanian
  • контролировать, контрольная группа, власть, контроль, управлятьRussian
  • kontroll, kontrollera, kontrollgruppSwedish
  • నియంత్రించుTelugu
  • kontrol etmek, kumanda etmek, kontrolTurkish
  • qaboo krnaUrdu
  • Chinese

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  • A. abhor
  • B. abide
  • C. elaborate
  • D. efface

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