What does COLLEGE mean?

Definitions for COLLEGE
ˈkɒl ɪdʒcol·lege

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word COLLEGE.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. collegenoun

    the body of faculty and students of a college

  2. collegenoun

    an institution of higher education created to educate and grant degrees; often a part of a university

  3. collegenoun

    a complex of buildings in which an institution of higher education is housed

Wiktionary

  1. collegenoun

    An institution of further education at an intermediate level (in the UK, typically teaching those aged 16 to 19); sixth form.

  2. collegenoun

    An institution for adult education at a basic or intermediate level (teaching those of any age).

  3. collegenoun

    A secondary school.

    Eton College

  4. collegenoun

    A non-specialized, semi-autonomous division of a university, with its own faculty, departments, library, etc.

    Pembroke College, Cambridge; Balliol College, Oxford; University College, London

  5. collegenoun

    A residential hall associated with a university, which may be independent or have its own tutors but is not involved in teaching.

  6. collegenoun

    Any institution of higher education.

  7. collegenoun

    An institution of higher education teaching undergraduates and/or graduates. Nearly synonymous with university, with less emphasis on research and may, or may not, have graduate or doctoral programs.

  8. collegenoun

    A specialized division of a university.

    College of Engineering

  9. collegenoun

    A high school or secondary school.

  10. Etymology: From college, from collegium.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. COLLEGEnoun

    Etymology: collegium, Latin.

    On barbed steeds they rode in proud array,
    Thick as the college of the bees in May. Dryden.

    He is return’d with his opinions, which
    Have satisfied the king for his divorce,
    Gather’d from all the famous colleges
    Almost in Christendom. William Shakespeare, Henry VIII.

    I would the college of the cardinals
    Would chuse him pope, and carry him to Rome. William Shakespeare, H. VI.

    This order or society is sometimes called Solomon’s house, and sometimes the college of the six days work. Francis Bacon.

    Huldah the prophetess dwelt in Jerusalem in the college. 2 Kings xxii. 14.

Wikipedia

  1. College

    A college (Latin: collegium) is an educational institution or a constituent part of one. A college may be a degree-awarding tertiary educational institution, a part of a collegiate or federal university, an institution offering vocational education, or a secondary school. In most of the world, a college may be a high school or secondary school, a college of further education, a training institution that awards trade qualifications, a higher-education provider that does not have university status (often without its own degree-awarding powers), or a constituent part of a university. In the United States, a college may offer undergraduate programs – either as an independent institution or as the undergraduate program of a university – or it may be a residential college of a university or a community college, referring to (primarily public) higher education institutions that aim to provide affordable and accessible education, usually limited to two-year associate degrees. The word is generally also used as a synonym for a university in the US. Colleges in countries such as France, Belgium, and Switzerland provide secondary education.

ChatGPT

  1. college

    A college is an institution of higher learning that provides undergraduate and often graduate programs, in a variety of study fields. It grants degrees, such as associate, bachelor's or master's degrees, to students who have completed a particular course of study. College education typically follows secondary school and aims to prepare students for professional careers or further academic studies.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Collegenoun

    a collection, body, or society of persons engaged in common pursuits, or having common duties and interests, and sometimes, by charter, peculiar rights and privileges; as, a college of heralds; a college of electors; a college of bishops

  2. Collegenoun

    a society of scholars or friends of learning, incorporated for study or instruction, esp. in the higher branches of knowledge; as, the colleges of Oxford and Cambridge Universities, and many American colleges

  3. Collegenoun

    a building, or number of buildings, used by a college

  4. Collegenoun

    fig.: A community

  5. Etymology: [F. collge, L. collegium, fr. collega colleague. See Colleague.]

Wikidata

  1. College

    A college is an educational institution or a constituent part of one. Usage of the word college varies in English-speaking nations. A college may be a degree-awarding tertiary educational institution, a part of a collegiate university, or an institution offering vocational education. In the United States, "college" formally refers to a constituent part of a university, although in Ireland and in some cases in the US, "college" and "university" are interchangeable, whereas in Ireland, the UK, New Zealand, Australia, Canada and other former and present Commonwealth nations, "college" may refer to a secondary or high school, a college of further education, a training institution that awards trade qualifications, or a constituent part of a university.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. College

    kol′ej, n. an incorporation, company, or society of persons joined together generally for literary or scientific purposes, and often possessing peculiar or exclusive privileges: a member of the body known as the university: (U.S.) often used as the equivalent of university: a seminary of learning: a literary, political, or religious institution: the edifice appropriated to a college.—n. Coll′eger, inmate of a college: one of the seventy foundationers at Eton College.—adj. Collē′gial, pertaining to a college.—ns. Collē′gian, a member or inhabitant of a college: (slang) inmate of a prison; Collē′gianer, a member of a college, a student.—adj. Collē′giate, pertaining to or resembling a college: containing a college, as a town; instituted like a college: corporate.—n. inmate of a prison, &c.—College of Arms, Heralds' College, a collegiate body incorporated in 1483, presided over by the Earl Marshal, and including Garter, principal King-of-arms, Clarenceux, and Norroy, besides six heralds and four pursuivants: College of Justice, in Scotland, a great forensic society, composed of judges, advocates, writers to the signet, and solicitors.—Collegiate church, Collegial church, a church so called from having a college or chapter, consisting of a dean or provost and canons, attached to it (in Scotland, a church occupied by two or more pastors of equal rank—also Collegiate charge). [Fr. collège—L. collegium, from col, and legĕre, to gather.]

The Roycroft Dictionary

  1. college

    A place where you have to go in order to find out that there is nothing in it. (See Marriage.)

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. COLLEGE

    From Fr. _colle_, pasted or stuck, and _etude_, study. A place where everyone is stuck on study. (?)

Editors Contribution

  1. college

    A type of education system for the provision of education, learning, training, instruction for a range of curriculum, courses and study for students with just sufficient classrooms, buildings and appropriate forms of housing, leisure and sports facilities, gym, space for vehicles and bicycles, open space and landscaping, provided as a goodwill gesture to members of the public and paid for with a variety of local unity government funding, regional unity government funding, national unity government funding, european unity government funding, international unity government funding, business funding, philanthropy income, music artist philanthropy income, citizen income and crowdfunding.

    Colleges are an amazing place to learn, grow, mature, develop and have fun.


    Submitted by MaryC on April 8, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. college

    Song lyrics by college -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by college on the Lyrics.com website.

Surnames Frequency by Census Records

  1. COLLEGE

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, College is ranked #49365 in terms of the most common surnames in America.

    The College surname appeared 426 times in the 2010 census and if you were to sample 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 0 would have the surname College.

    92.4% or 394 total occurrences were White.
    3.2% or 14 total occurrences were Black.
    1.8% or 8 total occurrences were of two or more races.
    1.6% or 7 total occurrences were of Hispanic origin.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'COLLEGE' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #1011

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'COLLEGE' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1035

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'COLLEGE' in Nouns Frequency: #346

How to pronounce COLLEGE?

How to say COLLEGE in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of COLLEGE in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of COLLEGE in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of COLLEGE in a Sentence

  1. Jeffrey Bazarian:

    That’s really the implication for not just Major League Baseball, but college baseball and high school baseball, we need to do more research to figure that out.

  2. Samer Jaber:

    Just be careful, as your skin in that area will likely be sensitive and topical acne treatments can make this more irritated and even worse. FOGGY GLASSES Since face masks trap the breath and foster moist, humid environments, glasses wearersmay have noticed that wearing a face mask can cause your lenses to fog. In a 2011 study from the Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, researchers advised washing the glasses with soapy water immediately before wearing a face mask. Face masks trap the breath and foster humidity so glasses wearers may have noticed that wearing a face mask can cause the lenses to fog. (iStock) After shaking off any excess water, let the spectacles air dry or gently dry off the lenses with a soft tissue before putting them back on. Now the spectacle lenses should not mist up when the face mask is worn, they wrote. Glasses fog because humidity can escape the mask and move upward, coming into contact with the lenses and causing them to fog. Placing a tissue under the top of your face mask can also help absorb some of the droplets, leading to clear lenses. Wearing a mask that can form to the bridge of your nose one with wire, for instance can help prevent the warm air from your mouth from reaching your lenses. DRY, CRACKED HANDS FROM FREQUENT WASHING Next, frequent hand washing, especially during the ongoing pandemic, can lead to skin feeling dry, irritatedor cracked. Preventing rough skin can be as simple as switching to a fragrance-free hand soap, which may contain fewer irritants. But Jaber also recommends carrying hand moisturizer for use after washing and drying your hands, suggesting a cream or an ointment rather than a lotion, as lotions are usually thinner and often contain alcohol. Experts advise carrying hand moisturizer for use after washing and drying your hands. (iStock) Lotions can be great, but creams or ointments are thicker. Vaseline is an ointment, and it really locks things in.

  3. Mitch McConnell:

    Once those certifications occur, if they occur, based upon litigation that's being tried in various places, those will be final, the Electoral College will meet in December, and the inauguration will be on January 20.

  4. Chair Carnahan:

    While we work for the same cause, the Republican Party of Minnesota has no jurisdiction over the Minnesota College Republicans, including the chapter at the University of St. Thomas. Minnesota CR chapters are independently run organizations, we stand with victims of sex trafficking and encourage anyone with information to contact the FBI Minneapolis Division at 763-569-8000.

  5. Manjunath Sadashiva:

    A large number of young people having such undesirable attitudes toward violence against women - including girls themselves - is alarming, these are school-going and college-going students – they’re not uneducated or non-literate people. These are people from cities, not even rural areas... These attitudes that students are displaying are potentially what they are absorbing from society at large, from their families.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

COLLEGE#1#409#10000

Translations for COLLEGE

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

  • كلية, معهدArabic
  • মহাবিদ্যালয়Bengali
  • kolejCzech
  • colegWelsh
  • kollegiumDanish
  • Berufsfachschule, Fachhochschule, Berufskolleg, FachschuleGerman
  • σχολή, κολέγιο, ΚολλέγιοGreek
  • colegio, facultadSpanish
  • آموزشگاه, کالج, دانشكدهPersian
  • tiedekunta, opiskelu, oppilaitos, opsto, aikuisoppilaitos, akatemia, [[toisen]] [[asteen]] [[oppilaitos]], ammattikunta, asuntola, korkeakoulu, yliopisto, kollegio, opisto, ammattikorkeakouluFinnish
  • מכללהHebrew
  • कॉलेज, कालेजHindi
  • főiskolaHungarian
  • perguruan tinggiIndonesian
  • UniversitàItalian
  • 学園, 単科大学, 学部, 学寮, 大学, 寮Japanese
  • koledžasLithuanian
  • kāretiMāori
  • училиште, факултет, академија, виша школа, институтMacedonian
  • kolej, maktabMalay
  • faculteitDutch
  • høyskoleNorwegian
  • setor, IES, [[instituição]] [[de]] [[ensino superior]], faculdade, colégioPortuguese
  • școală secundară, colegiu, institut, facultateRomanian
  • корпорация, колледж, институт, техникум, отделение, ПТУ, вуз, высшая школа, факультет, училище, общежитие, коллегияRussian
  • visoka škola, institut, veleučilište, učilište, viša škola, факу̀лте̄т, koledž, fakùltētSerbo-Croatian
  • vysoká školaSlovak
  • högskolaSwedish
  • கல்லூரிTamil
  • kolejTurkish
  • 学院Chinese

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