What does Bristol mean?

Definitions for Bristol
ˈbrɪs tlbris·tol

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word Bristol.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Bristolnoun

    an industrial city and port in southwestern England near the mouth of the River Avon

Wiktionary

  1. Bristolnoun

    A city and county in south-west England.

  2. bristolnoun

    A woman's breast, usually as the plural bristols.

  3. Etymology: Shortened from Bristol City, the name of an English football team, for, titty.

Wikipedia

  1. Bristol

    Bristol ( (listen)) is a city, ceremonial county and unitary authority in England. Situated on the River Avon, it is bordered by the ceremonial counties of Gloucestershire to the north and Somerset to the south. Bristol is the most populous city in South West England. The wider Bristol Built-up Area is the eleventh most populous urban area in the United Kingdom.Iron Age hillforts and Roman villas were built near the confluence of the rivers Frome and Avon. Around the beginning of the 11th century, the settlement was known as Brycgstow (Old English: 'the place at the bridge'). Bristol received a royal charter in 1155 and was historically divided between Gloucestershire and Somerset until 1373 when it became a county corporate. From the 13th to the 18th century, Bristol was among the top three English cities, after London, in tax receipts. A major port, Bristol was a starting place for early voyages of exploration to the New World. On a ship out of Bristol in 1497, John Cabot, a Venetian, became the first European to land on mainland North America. In 1499, William Weston, a Bristol merchant, was the first Englishman to lead an exploration to North America. At the height of the Bristol slave trade, from 1700 to 1807, more than 2,000 slave ships carried an estimated 500,000 people from Africa to slavery in the Americas. The Port of Bristol has since moved from Bristol Harbour in the city centre to the Severn Estuary at Avonmouth and Royal Portbury Dock. Bristol's modern economy is built on the creative media, electronics and aerospace industries; the city-centre docks have been redeveloped as centres of heritage and culture. The city has the largest circulating community currency in the UK, the Bristol Pound, which is pegged to the pound sterling. The city has two universities: the University of Bristol and the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol). There are a variety of artistic and sporting organisations and venues including the Royal West of England Academy, the Arnolfini, Spike Island, Ashton Gate and the Memorial Stadium. It is connected to London and other major UK cities by road and rail, and to the world by sea and air: road, by the M5 and M4 (which connect to the city centre by the Portway and M32); rail, via Bristol Temple Meads and Bristol Parkway mainline rail stations; and Bristol Airport. Bristol was named the best city in Britain in which to live in 2014 and 2017; it won the European Green Capital Award in 2015.

ChatGPT

  1. bristol

    Bristol is a city situated in South West England. It is known for its rich maritime history, vibrant culture, and popular landmarks such as the Clifton Suspension Bridge. The term "Bristol" can also refer to the Bristol scale, a medical tool used for classifying the form of human feces into seven categories. Additionally, Bristol is also a type of heavyweight paper often used for drawing and printing purposes.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Bristolnoun

    a seaport city in the west of England

Wikidata

  1. Bristol

    Bristol is a city, unitary authority area and ceremonial county in South West England, with an estimated population of 433,100 for the unitary authority in 2009, and a surrounding Larger Urban Zone with an estimated 1,070,000 residents in 2007. It is England's sixth and the United Kingdom's eighth most populous city, one of the Core Cities Group and the most populous city in South West England. Historically split between Gloucestershire and Somerset, the city received a Royal charter in 1155 and was granted County status in 1373. From the 13th century, for half a millennium, it ranked amongst the top three English cities after London, alongside York and Norwich, on the basis of tax receipts, until the rapid rise of Liverpool, Birmingham and Manchester during the Industrial Revolution in the latter part of the 18th century. It borders the counties of Somerset and Gloucestershire, and is also located near the historic cities of Bath to the south east and Gloucester to the north. The city is built around the River Avon, and it also has a short coastline on the Severn Estuary, which flows into the Bristol Channel. Bristol is the largest centre of culture, employment and education in the region. Its prosperity has been linked with the sea since its earliest days. The commercial Port of Bristol was originally in the city centre before being moved to the Severn Estuary at Avonmouth; Royal Portbury Dock is on the western edge of the city boundary. In more recent years the economy has depended on the creative media, electronics and aerospace industries, and the city centre docks have been regenerated as a centre of heritage and culture. There are 34 other populated places on Earth named Bristol, most in the United States, but also in Peru, Canada, Jamaica, Barbados, and Costa Rica, all presumably commemorating the original.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Bristol

    on the Avon, 6 m. from its mouth, and 118 m. W. of London, is the largest town in Gloucestershire, the seventh in England, and a great seaport, with Irish, W. Indian, and S. American trade; it manufactures tobacco, boots and shoes; it has a cathedral, two colleges, a library and many educational institutions; by a charter of Edward III. it forms a county in itself.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. bristol

    (West England). Built by Brennus, a British prince, 380 B.C.; is mentioned in 430 as a fortified city; taken by the Earl of Gloucester in his defense of his sister Maud, the empress, against King Stephen, 1138; taken by Prince Rupert, 1643; by Cromwell, 1645.

Suggested Resources

  1. bristol

    Song lyrics by bristol -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by bristol on the Lyrics.com website.

Etymology and Origins

  1. Bristol

    Called by the Anglo-Saxons “Brightstow,” or pleasant, stockaded place.

Surnames Frequency by Census Records

  1. BRISTOL

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Bristol is ranked #4611 in terms of the most common surnames in America.

    The Bristol surname appeared 7,694 times in the 2010 census and if you were to sample 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 3 would have the surname Bristol.

    73% or 5,622 total occurrences were White.
    18.3% or 1,415 total occurrences were Black.
    4.3% or 337 total occurrences were of Hispanic origin.
    2.5% or 199 total occurrences were of two or more races.
    1.1% or 91 total occurrences were Asian.
    0.3% or 30 total occurrences were American Indian or Alaskan Native.

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Bristol' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #3425

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Bristol' in Written Corpus Frequency: #4347

How to pronounce Bristol?

How to say Bristol in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Bristol in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Bristol in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of Bristol in a Sentence

  1. The EPA:

    We stand behind our study and our public policy, and we are confident in our work to protect Bristol Bay.

  2. Brendan Gaughan:

    But now the world has changed where you can kind of step over those bounds and make change, and they made a very positive one. It will work out great for our sport, as a whole. I think well gain a lot of new fans and a lot of new people will be paying attention, and thats great for all of us. THE FEUDS Hamlin, who won his third Daytona 500 in February, has been beefing with LaJoie on Twitter for months. It seemed harmless at first it wasnt even clear they were serious but took a turn in the last week. After Hamlin drew the top starting spot for last weeks race at Homestead-Miami Speedway, where Hamlin lost three chances at a championship in season finale races, LaJoie said Hamlin would win the race because there was nothing on the line. That low blow escalated the warring words, prompting NASCAR to step in with an at-track meeting, Hamlin, who did indeed win at Homestead last Sunday, said after that race the feud was over. But LaJoie in his weekly podcast continued the clash until finally relenting Thursday with a social media post apologizing for his role in the bickering. LaJoie explained his position during a Zoom session with reporters and said both were wrong. Did I run my mouth a little bit more than what I probably should have? Yes. Did he do things that he probably regretted? Yes. Thats how we got into this situation, LaJoie said. We are both grown-ups. We both have kids. We both have jobs and livelihoods that are bigger than this little tiff we have going on. Meanwhile, Logano has not forgiven Elliott for the mistake that took them both out of contention on the final lap at Bristol. Logano refused to cut Elliott any room on the track as he raced Hamlin for the victory last week by making it difficult for Elliott to get past him every chance Logano had. Elliott curtly said after the race he needed to learn how to handle lapped traffic better and never mentioned Logano specifically. Logano has made it clear he has no incentive to get out of Elliotts way. You race people the way they race you. You cant do things without repercussions of some sort. You cost me a win, I cost you a win. Those types of things go like that.

  3. Mark Dodgson:

    We wouldn't bulldoze the city of Bristol because it was built on the profits of slavery, is it really sensible to think that by destroying or stopping the trade in our cultural heritage we're going to save any African elephants?

  4. Ashtyn Evans:

    Bristol is a lot different than it was just a few years ago.

  5. Alannah Hurley:

    It is impossible for Pebble to mitigate the devastation this mine will have on our Native cultures, our way of life that has been sustained for thousands of years by the pristine lands and waters of the Bristol Bay watershed.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Bristol#1#5068#10000

Translations for Bristol

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

Get even more translations for Bristol »

Translation

Find a translation for the Bristol definition in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Português (Portuguese)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • العربية (Arabic)
  • Français (French)
  • Русский (Russian)
  • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • 한국어 (Korean)
  • עברית (Hebrew)
  • Gaeilge (Irish)
  • Українська (Ukrainian)
  • اردو (Urdu)
  • Magyar (Hungarian)
  • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italiano (Italian)
  • தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Türkçe (Turkish)
  • తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Čeština (Czech)
  • Polski (Polish)
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Românește (Romanian)
  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

Word of the Day

Would you like us to send you a FREE new word definition delivered to your inbox daily?

Please enter your email address:


Citation

Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"Bristol." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 26 May 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/Bristol>.

Discuss these Bristol definitions with the community:

0 Comments

    Are we missing a good definition for Bristol? Don't keep it to yourself...

    Image or illustration of

    Bristol

    Credit »

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Chrome

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Firefox

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Browse Definitions.net

    Quiz

    Are you a words master?

    »
    move deeply
    A disturb
    B depend
    C demolish
    D acclaim

    Nearby & related entries:

    Alternative searches for Bristol: