What does BAT mean?

Definitions for BAT
bætBAT

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word BAT.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. bat, chiropteran(noun)

    nocturnal mouselike mammal with forelimbs modified to form membranous wings and anatomical adaptations for echolocation by which they navigate

  2. bat, at-bat(noun)

    (baseball) a turn trying to get a hit

    "he was at bat when it happened"; "he got four hits in four at-bats"

  3. squash racket, squash racquet, bat(noun)

    a small racket with a long handle used for playing squash

  4. cricket bat, bat(noun)

    the club used in playing cricket

    "a cricket bat has a narrow handle and a broad flat end for hitting"

  5. bat(verb)

    a club used for hitting a ball in various games

  6. bat(verb)

    strike with, or as if with a baseball bat

    "bat the ball"

  7. bat, flutter(verb)

    wink briefly

    "bat one's eyelids"

  8. bat(verb)

    have a turn at bat

    "Jones bats first, followed by Martinez"

  9. bat(verb)

    use a bat

    "Who's batting?"

  10. cream, bat, clobber, drub, thrash, lick(verb)

    beat thoroughly and conclusively in a competition or fight

    "We licked the other team on Sunday!"

Wiktionary

  1. bat(Noun)

    A club made of wood or aluminium used for striking the ball in sports such as baseball, softball and cricket.

    Etymology: From baitaz. Related to Old Norse beit. bátr (Icelandic: bátur) is a borrowing from ; German Boot and Dutch boot are loans from the descendant.

  2. bat(Noun)

    A turn at hitting the ball with a bat in a game.

    Etymology: From baitaz. Related to Old Norse beit. bátr (Icelandic: bátur) is a borrowing from ; German Boot and Dutch boot are loans from the descendant.

  3. bat

    The piece of wood on which the spinner places the coins and then uses for throwing them. (Reference Sidney J. Baker, The Australian Language, second edition, 1966, chapter XI section 3, page 242.)

    Etymology: From baitaz. Related to Old Norse beit. bátr (Icelandic: bátur) is a borrowing from ; German Boot and Dutch boot are loans from the descendant.

  4. bat(Verb)

    to hit with a bat.

    Etymology: From baitaz. Related to Old Norse beit. bátr (Icelandic: bátur) is a borrowing from ; German Boot and Dutch boot are loans from the descendant.

  5. bat(Verb)

    to take a turn at hitting a ball with a bat in sports like cricket, baseball and softball, as opposed to fielding.

    Etymology: From baitaz. Related to Old Norse beit. bátr (Icelandic: bátur) is a borrowing from ; German Boot and Dutch boot are loans from the descendant.

  6. bat

    to strike or swipe as though with a bat

    The cat batted at the toy.

    Etymology: From baitaz. Related to Old Norse beit. bátr (Icelandic: bátur) is a borrowing from ; German Boot and Dutch boot are loans from the descendant.

  7. bat(Verb)

    to flutter: bat one's eyelashes.

    Etymology: From baitaz. Related to Old Norse beit. bátr (Icelandic: bátur) is a borrowing from ; German Boot and Dutch boot are loans from the descendant.

  8. bat(Noun)

    packsaddle

    Etymology: From baitaz. Related to Old Norse beit. bátr (Icelandic: bátur) is a borrowing from ; German Boot and Dutch boot are loans from the descendant.

Wikipedia

  1. Bat

    Bats are mammals of the order Chiroptera. With their forelimbs adapted as wings, they are the only mammals capable of true and sustained flight. Bats are more manoeuvrable than birds, flying with their very long spread-out digits covered with a thin membrane or patagium. The smallest bat, and arguably the smallest extant mammal, is Kitti's hog-nosed bat, which is 29–34 millimetres (1 1⁄8–1 3⁄8 inches) in length, 150 mm (6 in) across the wings and 2–2.6 g (1⁄16–3⁄32 oz) in mass. The largest bats are the flying foxes and the giant golden-crowned flying fox, Acerodon jubatus, which can weigh 1.6 kg (3 1⁄2 lb) and have a wingspan of 1.7 m (5 ft 7 in). The second largest order of mammals after rodents, bats comprise about 20% of all classified mammal species worldwide, with over 1,400 species. These were traditionally divided into two suborders: the largely fruit-eating megabats, and the echolocating microbats. But more recent evidence has supported dividing the order into Yinpterochiroptera and Yangochiroptera, with megabats as members of the former along with several species of microbats. Many bats are insectivores, and most of the rest are frugivores (fruit-eaters) or nectarivores (nectar-eaters). A few species feed on animals other than insects; for example, the vampire bats feed on blood. Most bats are nocturnal, and many roost in caves or other refuges; it is uncertain whether bats have these behaviours to escape predators. Bats are present throughout the world, with the exception of extremely cold regions. They are important in their ecosystems for pollinating flowers and dispersing seeds; many tropical plants depend entirely on bats for these services. Bats provide humans with some direct benefits, at the cost of some disadvantages. On the benefits side, bat dung has been and in many places still is mined as guano from caves and used as fertiliser. Bats consume insect pests, reducing the need for pesticides and other insect management measures. They are sometimes numerous enough and close enough to human settlements to serve as tourist attractions, and they are used as food across Asia and the Pacific Rim. On the disadvantages side, fruit bats are frequently considered pests by fruit growers. Due to their physiology, bats are one type of animal that acts as a natural reservoir of many pathogens, such as rabies; and since they are highly mobile, social, and long-lived, they can readily spread disease among themselves. If humans interact with bats, these traits become potentially dangerous to humans. Depending on the culture, bats may be symbolically associated with positive traits, such as protection from certain diseases or risks, rebirth, or long life, but in the West, bats are popularly associated with darkness, malevolence, witchcraft, vampires, and death.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Bat(noun)

    a large stick; a club; specifically, a piece of wood with one end thicker or broader than the other, used in playing baseball, cricket, etc

  2. Bat(noun)

    shale or bituminous shale

  3. Bat(noun)

    a sheet of cotton used for filling quilts or comfortables; batting

  4. Bat(noun)

    a part of a brick with one whole end

  5. Bat(verb)

    to strike or hit with a bat or a pole; to cudgel; to beat

  6. Bat(verb)

    to use a bat, as in a game of baseball

  7. Bat(noun)

    one of the Cheiroptera, an order of flying mammals, in which the wings are formed by a membrane stretched between the elongated fingers, legs, and tail. The common bats are small and insectivorous. See Cheiroptera and Vampire

Freebase

  1. Bat

    Bats are mammals of the order Chiroptera whose forelimbs form webbed wings, making them the only mammals naturally capable of true and sustained flight. By contrast, other mammals said to fly, such as flying squirrels, gliding possums, and colugos, can only glide for short distances. Bats do not flap their entire forelimbs, as birds do, but instead flap their spread-out digits, which are very long and covered with a thin membrane or patagium. Bats represent about 20% of all classified mammal species worldwide, with about 1,240 bat species divided into two suborders: the less specialized and largely fruit-eating megabats, or flying foxes, and the more highly specialized and echolocating microbats. About 70% of bats are insectivores. Most of the rest are frugivores, or fruit eaters. A few species, such as the fish-eating bat, feed from animals other than insects, with the vampire bats being hematophagous. Bats are present throughout most of the world, performing vital ecological roles of pollinating flowers and dispersing fruit seeds. Many tropical plant species depend entirely on bats for the distribution of their seeds. Bats are important in eating insect pests, reducing the need for pesticides. The smallest bat is the Kitti's hog-nosed bat, measuring 29–34 mm in length, 15 cm across the wings and 2–2.6 g in mass. It is also arguably the smallest extant species of mammal, with the Etruscan shrew being the other contender. The largest species of bat are a few species of Pteropus and the giant golden-crowned flying fox with a weight up to 1.6 kg and wingspan up to 1.7 m.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Bat

    bat, n. a heavy stick: a flat club for striking the ball in cricket, a club for base-balls, a batsman: the clown's sword in a pantomime: a piece of brick: (slang) rate of speed, style.—v.i. to use the bat in cricket:—pr.p. bat′ting; pa.p. bat′ted.—ns. Bat′ter, Bats′man, one who wields the bat at cricket, &c.; Bat′ting, the management of a bat in playing games: cotton fibre prepared in sheets. [Perh. from A.S. bat (a doubtful form), prob. Celt. bat, staff.]

  2. Bat

    bat, n. an animal with a body like a mouse, but which flies on wings attached mainly to its fore-feet, but extending along its sides to the hind-feet. [M. E. bakke, apparently from Scand.; cf. Dan. aftenbakke, evening-bat.]

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. BAT

    Senior partner of Bat, Ball & Co., and never found without the rest of the firm, as it takes several high-balls to make one short bat.

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. bat

    An Anglo-Saxon term for boat or vessel. Also a broad-bodied thoracic fish, with a small head, and distinguished by its large triangular dorsal and anal fins, which exceed the length of the body. It is the Chætodon vespertilio of naturalists.

Suggested Resources

  1. bat

    The bat symbol -- In this Symbols.com article you will learn about the meaning of the bat symbol and its characteristic.

  2. BAT

    What does BAT stand for? -- Explore the various meanings for the BAT acronym on the Abbreviations.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'BAT' in Nouns Frequency: #2614

How to pronounce BAT?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say BAT in sign language?

  1. bat

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of BAT in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of BAT in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of BAT in a Sentence

  1. Frederick Hubbard:

    Now, the question is, what do we need to do to get them to recover ? said Dr. Frank Ridgleyhead of conservation and research at Zoo Miami. Biologists believe they have the answer. Executives of the Patch of Heaven Sanctuary, a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating habitats for wildlife, in February finished building what they claim is the largest bat house in the world in an effort to save Floridas high flyers. Nobody else is doing this kind of work. Not on this scale, said Frederick Hubbard, the sanctuarys executive director. The two-tier structure can house up to 250,000 bats. The University of Florida boasts large bat houses of The University of Florida own.According to the [ UF ] web site, theyre the biggest occupied bat houses in the world, Frederick Hubbard told the Miami Herald. Our bat house is technically bigger. Were trying to get the wording right on that. Frederick Hubbard says the batstend to form colonies, living together and procreating. The new two-tier bat house can hold up to 250,000 total bats. ( Elina Shirazi/Fox News) Theres usually a dominant male, a large male who establishes and claims these coveted kinds of spaces and then he tries to attract females and the females tend to then be attracted to a male who is going to defend the territory and keep a safe space for them, Ridgley said. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP Ridgley says the bats are vital to biodiversity and in fact helpful to humans. Theyre cleaning up our skies. Theyre providing all these services and in some parts of the country, you know, bats literally provide billions of dollars of services to the residents, Ridgley said. Ridgley said its hard to know the history of the bats since they were only discovered as a unique species in 2004. There was very little known about this bat just about a decade ago. I mean they only knew of one place where they were roosting and it was a mystery across their whole range here in South Florida. Anything about them, you know, what kind of groups they had, what they need to survive. So there was a lot of intensive study going into answering some of these questions, said Ridgley. Ridgley estimates their population is now only in the hundreds, and technology is helping them to keep track. One device they use, an echo meter, plugs into a cell phone and identifies the type of bat and itslocation based off of sound. They do a type of echolocation and supposedly they have some recorded sounds that theyre going to be able to put up into the bat-house that will attract them, said Frederick Hubbard. Creators claim this bat house at the Patch of Heaven Sanctuary is the largest in the world. Frederick Hubbard said that if their project accomplishes its aim, it may help rewrite the fate of these bats who have lost almost all of their habitat. For now, Frederick Hubbard said they are patiently waiting for the bats to rent out their space. Come home.

  2. Nikolai Petrovsky:

    The result of these experiments is a virus that is highly virulent in humans but is sufficiently different that it no longer resembles the original bat virus, because the mutations are acquired randomly by selection, there is no signature of a human gene jockey, but this is clearly a virus still created by human intervention.

  3. Rock Sake Seth Podell:

    I just kind of fell in love with it right off the bat, burgers, pork chops, whatever you're eating you should be drinking sake with it.

  4. Officer Rachel McGuire:

    Apparently a broken bat went into the stands, she was taken to Beth Israel Medical Center with what appear to be life-threatening injuries.

  5. Shi Zhengli:

    The unknown viruses that we have discovered are actually just the tip of the iceberg, if we want to protect humans from viruses or avoid a second outbreak of new infectious diseases, we must go in advance to learn of these unknown viruses carried by wild animals in nature and then give early warnings. If we dont study [ the viruses ], there will possibly be another outbreak, she added. Shi Zhengli is seen inside the P4 laboratory in Wuhan, the capital of China's Hubei province, on February 23, 2017. ( AFP via Getty Images) A renowned virologist, Shi is best known for her work with bat coronaviruses at her lab at the Wuhan Institute of Virology( WIV). She discovered the natural bat reservoir for the SARS pathogen that spread in southern China from 2002 to 2003. Rumors in mid-April claimed that Shi had been.

Images & Illustrations of BAT

  1. BATBATBATBATBAT

Popularity rank by frequency of use

BAT#1#7477#10000

Translations for BAT

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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    directed outward; marked by interest in others or concerned with external reality
    • A. unsealed
    • B. extroversive
    • C. eloquent
    • D. aculeate

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