Definitions for premiseˈprɛm ɪs

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word premise

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

prem•iseˈprɛm ɪs(n.; v.)-ised, -is•ing.

  1. (n.)Also, prem′iss.Logic. a proposition supporting or helping to support a conclusion.

    Category: Philosphy

  2. premises, a tract of land including its buildings. a building or part of a building together with its grounds or other appurtenances: the property forming the subject of a conveyance or bequest.

    Is your mother on the premises?

    Category: Law

  3. Law. a basis, stated or assumed, on which reasoning proceeds. an earlier statement in a document. (in a bill in equity) the statement of facts upon which the complaint is based.

    Category: Law

  4. (v.t.)to set forth beforehand, as by way of introduction or explanation.

  5. to state or assume (a proposition) as a premise for a conclusion.

    Category: Philosphy

  6. (v.i.)to state or assume a premise.

Origin of premise:

1325–75; ME premiss < ML praemissa, n. use of fem. of L praemissus, ptp. of praemittere to send before =prae-pre - +mittere to send

Princeton's WordNet

  1. premise, premiss, assumption(verb)

    a statement that is assumed to be true and from which a conclusion can be drawn

    "on the assumption that he has been injured we can infer that he will not to play"

  2. premise(verb)

    set forth beforehand, often as an explanation

    "He premised these remarks so that his readers might understand"

  3. precede, preface, premise, introduce(verb)

    furnish with a preface or introduction

    "She always precedes her lectures with a joke"; "He prefaced his lecture with a critical remark about the institution"

  4. premise, premiss(verb)

    take something as preexisting and given

Wiktionary

  1. premise(Noun)

    A proposition antecedently supposed or proved; something previously stated or assumed as the basis of further argument; a condition; a supposition.

  2. premise(Noun)

    Any of the first propositions of a syllogism, from which the conclusion is deduced.

  3. premise(Noun)

    Matters previously stated or set forth; esp., that part in the beginning of a deed, the office of which is to express the grantor and grantee, and the land or thing granted or conveyed, and all that precedes the habendum; the thing demised or granted.

  4. premise(Noun)

    A piece of real estate; a building and its adjuncts (in this sense, used most often in the plural form).

    trespass on anotheru2019s premises

  5. premise(Verb)

    To state or assume something as a proposition to an argument

  6. premise(Verb)

    To make a premise

Webster Dictionary

  1. Premise(noun)

    a proposition antecedently supposed or proved; something previously stated or assumed as the basis of further argument; a condition; a supposition

  2. Premise(noun)

    either of the first two propositions of a syllogism, from which the conclusion is drawn

  3. Premise(noun)

    matters previously stated or set forth; esp., that part in the beginning of a deed, the office of which is to express the grantor and grantee, and the land or thing granted or conveyed, and all that precedes the habendum; the thing demised or granted

  4. Premise(noun)

    a piece of real estate; a building and its adjuncts; as, to lease premises; to trespass on another's premises

  5. Premise(noun)

    to send before the time, or beforehand; hence, to cause to be before something else; to employ previously

  6. Premise(noun)

    to set forth beforehand, or as introductory to the main subject; to offer previously, as something to explain or aid in understanding what follows; especially, to lay down premises or first propositions, on which rest the subsequent reasonings

  7. Premise(verb)

    to make a premise; to set forth something as a premise

Freebase

  1. Premise

    A premise is a statement that an argument claims will induce or justify a conclusion. In other words: a premise is an assumption that something is true. In logic, an argument requires a set of two declarative sentences known as the premises along with another declarative sentence known as the conclusion. This structure of two premises and one conclusion forms the basic argumentative structure. More complex arguments can use a series of rules to connect several premises to one conclusion, or to derive a number of conclusions from the original premises which then act as premises for additional conclusions. An example of this is the use of the rules of inference found within symbolic logic. Aristotle held that any logical argument could be reduced to two premises and a conclusion. Premises are sometimes left unstated in which case they are called missing premises, for example: It is evident that a tacitly understood claim is that Socrates is a man. The fully expressed reasoning is thus: In this example, the independent clauses preceding the comma are the premises, while "Socrates is mortal" is the conclusion.

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'premise' in Nouns Frequency: #1073

Anagrams of premise

  1. premies

  2. empires

  3. epimers

  4. permies

  5. emprise


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