What does premise mean?

Definitions for premise
ˈprɛm ɪspremise

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word premise.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. premise, premiss, assumptionverb

    a statement that is assumed to be true and from which a conclusion can be drawn

    "on the assumption that he has been injured we can infer that he will not to play"

  2. premiseverb

    set forth beforehand, often as an explanation

    "He premised these remarks so that his readers might understand"

  3. precede, preface, premise, introduceverb

    furnish with a preface or introduction

    "She always precedes her lectures with a joke"; "He prefaced his lecture with a critical remark about the institution"

  4. premise, premissverb

    take something as preexisting and given

Wiktionary

  1. premisenoun

    A proposition antecedently supposed or proved; something previously stated or assumed as the basis of further argument; a condition; a supposition.

  2. premisenoun

    Any of the first propositions of a syllogism, from which the conclusion is deduced.

  3. premisenoun

    Matters previously stated or set forth; esp., that part in the beginning of a deed, the office of which is to express the grantor and grantee, and the land or thing granted or conveyed, and all that precedes the habendum; the thing demised or granted.

  4. premisenoun

    A piece of real estate; a building and its adjuncts (in this sense, used most often in the plural form).

    trespass on another's premises

  5. premiseverb

    To state or assume something as a proposition to an argument

  6. premiseverb

    To make a premise

Webster Dictionary

  1. Premisenoun

    a proposition antecedently supposed or proved; something previously stated or assumed as the basis of further argument; a condition; a supposition

    Etymology: [From L. praemissus, p. p., or E. premise, n. See Premise, n.]

  2. Premisenoun

    either of the first two propositions of a syllogism, from which the conclusion is drawn

    Etymology: [From L. praemissus, p. p., or E. premise, n. See Premise, n.]

  3. Premisenoun

    matters previously stated or set forth; esp., that part in the beginning of a deed, the office of which is to express the grantor and grantee, and the land or thing granted or conveyed, and all that precedes the habendum; the thing demised or granted

    Etymology: [From L. praemissus, p. p., or E. premise, n. See Premise, n.]

  4. Premisenoun

    a piece of real estate; a building and its adjuncts; as, to lease premises; to trespass on another's premises

    Etymology: [From L. praemissus, p. p., or E. premise, n. See Premise, n.]

  5. Premisenoun

    to send before the time, or beforehand; hence, to cause to be before something else; to employ previously

    Etymology: [From L. praemissus, p. p., or E. premise, n. See Premise, n.]

  6. Premisenoun

    to set forth beforehand, or as introductory to the main subject; to offer previously, as something to explain or aid in understanding what follows; especially, to lay down premises or first propositions, on which rest the subsequent reasonings

    Etymology: [From L. praemissus, p. p., or E. premise, n. See Premise, n.]

  7. Premiseverb

    to make a premise; to set forth something as a premise

    Etymology: [From L. praemissus, p. p., or E. premise, n. See Premise, n.]

Freebase

  1. Premise

    A premise is a statement that an argument claims will induce or justify a conclusion. In other words: a premise is an assumption that something is true. In logic, an argument requires a set of two declarative sentences known as the premises along with another declarative sentence known as the conclusion. This structure of two premises and one conclusion forms the basic argumentative structure. More complex arguments can use a series of rules to connect several premises to one conclusion, or to derive a number of conclusions from the original premises which then act as premises for additional conclusions. An example of this is the use of the rules of inference found within symbolic logic. Aristotle held that any logical argument could be reduced to two premises and a conclusion. Premises are sometimes left unstated in which case they are called missing premises, for example: It is evident that a tacitly understood claim is that Socrates is a man. The fully expressed reasoning is thus: In this example, the independent clauses preceding the comma are the premises, while "Socrates is mortal" is the conclusion.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Premise

    Premiss, prem′is, n. that which is premised or stated at the outset: a proposition previously stated or proved for after-reasoning: (logic) one of the two propositions in a syllogism from which the conclusion is drawn: the thing set forth in the beginning of a deed.—n.pl. Prem′ises, a building and its adjuncts.

  2. Premise

    prē-mīz′, v.t. to send or state before the rest: to make an introduction: to lay down propositions for subsequent reasonings. [Fr.,—L. (sententia) præmissa, (a sentence) put before—præ, before, mittĕre, missum, to send.]

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'premise' in Nouns Frequency: #1073

Anagrams for premise »

  1. premies

  2. empires

  3. epimers

  4. permies

  5. emprise

How to pronounce premise?

How to say premise in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of premise in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of premise in Pythagorean Numerology is: 4

Examples of premise in a Sentence

  1. Edward J. Burns:

    The fundamental premise of the affidavit is that because a piece of information discovered in an entirely independent police investigation is not in the dioceses files, the diocese must have hidden or concealed that information and is continuing to hide or conceal that information, so that it warrants a raid of religious offices.

  2. Ibrahim Hooper:

    Instead of stating you can be a good Australian and a good Muslim at the same time, he’s somehow throwing Islam under the bus and that’s where he got in trouble, muslims around the world follow sharia law every day of their lives when they pray, when they fast. There is no inherent conflict being a law-abiding Australian or American and practicing Islam. That’s a false premise.

  3. Craig Fehr:

    We are seeing markets rally on the premise that while the situation in China particularly with Evergrande is not going away, the outcome is not perhaps going to be as severe or prompt some form of contagion that was originally feared, you combine that with the fact that the tone that the Fed struck yesterday at its meeting suggests that while a reduction in stimulus is certainly coming, the Fed is not particularly eager to start tightening policy dramatically in the near term.

  4. Justice Anthony Kennedy:

    That was very interesting, but it's just a wrong premise.

  5. Mark Toner:

    We reject outright the premise that the Turkish Government is in league with ISIL to smuggle oil across its borders, and we frankly see no evidence – none – to support such an accusation.

Images & Illustrations of premise

  1. premisepremisepremisepremisepremise

Popularity rank by frequency of use

premise#10000#13500#100000

Translations for premise

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    • A. descant
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    • C. exacerbate
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