Definitions for mucusˈmyu kəs

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word mucus

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

mu•cusˈmyu kəs(n.)

  1. a viscous solution of mucins, water, electrolytes, and white blood cells that is secreted by mucous membranes and serves to protect and lubricate the internal surfaces of the body.

    Category: Biochemistry

Origin of mucus:

1655–65; < L mūcus snot; akin to Gk myktḗr nose, mýxa slime

Princeton's WordNet

  1. mucus, mucous secretion(noun)

    protective secretion of the mucus membranes; in the gut it lubricates the passage of food and protects the epithelial cells; in the nose and throat and lungs it can make it difficult for bacteria to penetrate the body through the epithelium

Wiktionary

  1. mucus(Noun)

    A slippery secretion from the lining of the mucous membranes.

  2. Origin: Borrowed from mucus.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Mucus(noun)

    a viscid fluid secreted by mucous membranes, which it serves to moisten and protect. It covers the lining membranes of all the cavities which open externally, such as those of the mouth, nose, lungs, intestinal canal, urinary passages, etc

  2. Mucus(noun)

    any other animal fluid of a viscid quality, as the synovial fluid, which lubricates the cavities of the joints; -- improperly so used

  3. Mucus(noun)

    a gelatinous or slimy substance found in certain algae and other plants

Freebase

  1. Mucus

    In vertebrates, mucus is a slippery secretion produced by, and covering, mucous membranes. Mucous fluid is typically produced from cells found in mucous glands. Mucous cells secrete products that are rich in glycoproteins and water. Mucous fluid may also originate from mixed glands, which contain both serous and mucous cells. It is a viscous colloid containing antiseptic enzymes, immunoglobulins, inorganic salts, proteins such as lactoferrin, and glycoproteins known as mucins that are produced by goblet cells in the mucous membranes and submucosal glands. This mucus serves to protect epithelial cells in the respiratory, gastrointestinal, urogenital, visual, and auditory systems in mammals; the epidermis in amphibians; and the gills in fish. A major function of this mucus is to protect against infectious agents such as fungi, bacteria and viruses. The average human body produces about a litre of mucus per day. Bony fish, hagfish, snails, slugs, and some other invertebrates also produce external mucus. In addition to serving a protective function against infectious agents, such mucus provides protection against toxins produced by predators, can facilitate movement and may play a role in communication.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Mucus

    The viscous secretion of mucous membranes. It contains mucin, white blood cells, water, inorganic salts, and exfoliated cells.


Translations for mucus

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

mucus(noun)

the fluid from the nose.

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