Definitions for glucoseˈglu koʊs

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word glucose

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

glu•coseˈglu koʊs(n.)

  1. a simple sugar, C6H12O6, that is a product of photosynthesis and is the principal source of energy for all living organisms: concentrated in fruits and honey or readily obtainable from starch, other carbohydrates, or glycogen.

    Category: Biochemistry

  2. a syrup containing dextrose, maltose, and dextrine, obtained by the incomplete hydrolysis of starch.

    Category: Biochemistry

Origin of glucose:

1830–40; < F < Gk glykýs sweet

glu•cos′ic(adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. glucose(noun)

    a monosaccharide sugar that has several forms; an important source of physiological energy

Wiktionary

  1. glucose(Noun)

    A simple monosaccharide (sugar) with a molecular formula of CHO; it is a principle source of energy for cellular metabolism.

  2. Origin: from related to ; note: -ose comes from glucose, not the other way round

Webster Dictionary

  1. Glucose(noun)

    a variety of sugar occurring in nature very abundantly, as in ripe grapes, and in honey, and produced in great quantities from starch, etc., by the action of heat and acids. It is only about half as sweet as cane sugar. Called also dextrose, grape sugar, diabetic sugar, and starch sugar. See Dextrose

  2. Glucose(noun)

    any one of a large class of sugars, isometric with glucose proper, and including levulose, galactose, etc

  3. Glucose(noun)

    the trade name of a sirup, obtained as an uncrystallizable reside in the manufacture of glucose proper, and containing, in addition to some dextrose or glucose, also maltose, dextrin, etc. It is used as a cheap adulterant of sirups, beers, etc

Freebase

  1. Glucose

    Glucose is a simple monosaccharide found in plants. It is one of the three dietary monosaccharides, along with fructose and galactose, that are absorbed directly into the bloodstream during digestion. An important carbohydrate in biology, cells use it as the primary source of energy and a metabolic intermediate. Glucose is one of the main products of photosynthesis and fuels for cellular respiration. Glucose exists in several different molecular structures, but all of these structures can be divided into two families of mirror-images. Only one set of these isomers exists in nature, those derived from the "right-handed form" of glucose, denoted D-glucose. D-glucose is sometimes referred to as dextrose, although the use of this name is strongly discouraged. The term dextrose is derived from dextrorotatory glucose. This name is therefore confusing when applied to the enantiomer, which rotates light in the opposite direction. Starch and cellulose are polymers derived from the dehydration of D-glucose. The other stereoisomer, called L-glucose, is hardly ever found in nature. The name "glucose" comes from the Greek word glukus, meaning "sweet". The suffix "-ose" denotes a sugar.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Glucose

    A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.


Translations for glucose

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

glucose(noun)

a kind of sugar found in the juice of fruit.

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