Definitions for face-to-face

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word face-to-face

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

face′-to-face′(adj.)

  1. having the fronts or faces toward or close to each other.

  2. involving close contact or direct opposition.

Origin of face-to-face:

1300–50

Princeton's WordNet

  1. face-to-face(adverb)

    in each other's presence

    "a face-to-face encounter"

  2. face-to-face(adverb)

    within each other's presence

    "she met the president face-to-face"

  3. face-to-face, opposite(adverb)

    directly facing each other

    "the two photographs lay face-to-face on the table"; "lived all their lives in houses face-to-face across the street"; "they sat opposite at the table"

  4. face to face(adverb)

    involving close contact; confronting each other

    "the boy and the policeman suddenly came face-to-face at the corner"; "they spoke face to face"

Wiktionary

  1. face-to-face(Adverb)

    While physically present.

  2. face-to-face(Adjective)

    In one another's presence.

  3. Origin: face + to + face

Freebase

  1. Face-to-face

    The face-to-face relation is a concept in the French philosopher Emmanuel Lévinas' thought on human sociality. It means that, ethically, people are responsible to one-another in the face-to-face encounter. Specifically, Lévinas says that the human face "orders and ordains" us. It calls the subject into “giving and serving” the Other. Face-to-face is similar to Mikhail Bakhtin's ethical concept in art and answerability and Martin Heidegger's concept of the authentic guilt as opposed to an inauthentic other. Lévinas' phenomenological account of the "face-to-face" encounter serves as the basis for his ethics and the rest of his philosophy. For Lévinas, "Ethics is the first philosophy." Lévinas argues that the encounter of the Other through the face reveals a certain poverty which forbids a reduction to Sameness and, simultaneously, installs a responsibility for the Other in the Self. Lévinas' account of the face-to-face encounter bears many similarities to Martin Buber's "I and Thou" relation. Its influence is also particularly pronounced in Jacques Derrida's ethical writings.

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"face-to-face." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 23 Oct. 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/face-to-face>.

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