Definitions for daguerreotypedəˈgɛər əˌtaɪp, -i əˌtaɪp

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word daguerreotype

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

da•guerre•o•typedəˈgɛər əˌtaɪp, -i əˌtaɪp(n.; v.)-typed, -typ•ing.

  1. (n.)an obsolete photographic process, invented in 1839, in which a picture made on a silver surface sensitized with iodine is developed by exposure to mercury vapor.

    Category: Photography

  2. a picture made by this process.

    Category: Photography

  3. (v.t.)to photograph by this process.

    Category: Photography

Origin of daguerreotype:

< F (1839), after L. J. M. Daguerre ; see -o -, -type

da•guerre′o•typ′y(n.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. daguerreotype(noun)

    a photograph made by an early photographic process; the image was produced on a silver plate sensitized to iodine and developed in mercury vapor

Wiktionary

  1. daguerreotype(Noun)

    An early type of photograph created by exposing a silver surface which has previously been exposed to either iodine vapor or iodine and bromine vapors.

  2. daguerreotype(Verb)

    To make a photograph using this process, to make a daguerreotype (of).

  3. Origin: Named after French artist Louis Daguerre who announced the process in 1839. Daguerre developed the process after some years of collaborations with French chemist Nicéphore Niépce.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Daguerreotype(noun)

    an early variety of photograph, produced on a silver plate, or copper plate covered with silver, and rendered sensitive by the action of iodine, or iodine and bromine, on which, after exposure in the camera, the latent image is developed by the vapor of mercury

  2. Daguerreotype(noun)

    the process of taking such pictures

  3. Daguerreotype(verb)

    to produce or represent by the daguerreotype process, as a picture

  4. Daguerreotype(verb)

    to impress with great distinctness; to imprint; to imitate exactly

Freebase

  1. Daguerreotype

    The daguerreotype was the first commercially successful photographic process, invented around 1837 by Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre. The physical daguerreotype itself is a direct positive made in the camera on a silvered copper plate. The raw material for plates was called Sheffield plate, plating by fusion or cold-rolled cladding and was a standard hardware item produced by heating and rolling silver foil in contact with a copper support. The surface of a daguerreotype is like a mirror, with the image made directly on the silvered surface; it is very fragile and can be rubbed off with a finger, and the finished plate has to be angled so as to reflect some dark surface in order to view the image properly. Depending on the angle viewed and the color of the surface reflected into it, the image can change from a positive to a negative. The cases provided to house daguerreotypes have a cover lined with velvet or plush to provide a dark surface that reflects into the plate for viewing. Alternatively there were cases designed as frames to hang on a wall, while the smallest sizes of daguerreotypes could be mounted into lockets as had been done with miniature paintings.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Daguerreotype

    a process named after its inventor, Louis Daguerre, a Frenchman, of producing pictures by means of the camera on a surface sensitive to light and shade, and interesting as the first step in photography.

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"daguerreotype." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 20 Aug. 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/daguerreotype>.

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