Definitions for virgilˈvɜr dʒəl

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word virgil

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

Vir•gilˈvɜr dʒəl(n.)

  1. (Publius Vergilius Maro) 70–19 b .c ., Roman poet: author of The Aeneid.

    Category: Biography

Vir•gil•i•anvərˈdʒɪl i ən, -ˈdʒɪl yən(adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Virgil, Vergil, Publius Vergilius Maro(noun)

    a Roman poet; author of the epic poem `Aeneid' (70-19 BC)

Wiktionary

  1. Virgil(ProperNoun)

    Pu016Bblius Vergilius Maru014D (70-19 B.C.), Roman epic writer from the Augustan period, best known for writing the Aeneid.

  2. Virgil(ProperNoun)

    , of mostly American usage.

  3. Origin: Virgilius, from the Roman clan name Vergilius, of unknown meaning.

Freebase

  1. Virgil

    Publius Vergilius Maro, usually called Virgil or Vergil in English, was an ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period. He is known for three major works of Latin literature, the Eclogues, the Georgics, and the epic Aeneid. A number of minor poems, collected in the Appendix Vergiliana, are sometimes attributed to him. Virgil is traditionally ranked as one of Rome's greatest poets. His Aeneid has been considered the national epic of ancient Rome from the time of its composition to the present day. Modeled after Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, the Aeneid follows the Trojan refugee Aeneas as he struggles to fulfill his destiny and arrive on the shores of Italy—in Roman mythology the founding act of Rome. Virgil's work has had wide and deep influence on Western literature, most notably the Divine Comedy of Dante, in which Virgil appears as Dante's guide through hell and purgatory.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Virgil

    great Latin poet, born near Mantua, author in succession of the "Eclogues," the "Georgics," and the "Æneid"; studied at Cremona and Milan, and at 16 was sent to Rome to study rhetoric and philosophy, lost a property he had in Cremona during the civil war, but recommended himself to Pollio, the governor, who introduced him to Augustus, and he went to settle in Rome; here, in 37 B.C., he published his "Eclogues," a collection of 10 pastorals, and gained the patronage of Mæcenas, under whose favour he was able to retire to a villa at Naples, where in seven years he, in 30 B.C., produced the "Georgics," in four books, on the art of husbandry, after which he devoted himself to his great work the "Æneid," or the story of Æneas of Troy, an epic in 12 books, connecting the hero with the foundation of Rome, and especially with the Julian family, and which was finished in 19 B.C.; on his deathbed he expressed a wish that it should be burned, and left instructions to that effect in his will; he was one of the purest-minded poets perhaps that ever lived (70-19 B.C.).

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