Definitions for viceˈvaɪ si, -sə, vaɪs

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word vice

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

vice*vaɪs(n.)

  1. an immoral or evil habit or practice.

  2. immoral conduct; depraved behavior.

  3. sexual immorality, esp. prostitution.

  4. a personal shortcoming; foible.

  5. a fault, defect, or flaw.

  6. a physical defect or infirmity.

  7. a bad habit, as in a horse.

* Syn: See fault.

Origin of vice:

1250–1300; ME < AF, OF < L vitium a fault, defect, vice

vicevaɪs(n.; v.t.)viced, vic•ing.

  1. Ref: vise 1

vi•ceˈvaɪ si, -sə, vaɪs(prep.)

  1. instead of; in the place of.

Origin of vice:

1760–70; < L: abl. of vicis (gen.; not attested in nom.) interchange, alternation

vice-

  1. a combining form meaning “deputy,” used esp. in the titles of officials who serve in the absence of the official denoted by the base word:

    viceroy; vice-chancellor; vice-chairman.

    Category: Affix

Origin of vice-:

ME 蠐 L vicevice3

Princeton's WordNet

  1. frailty, vice(noun)

    moral weakness

  2. vice(noun)

    a specific form of evildoing

    "vice offends the moral standards of the community"

Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

  1. vice(noun)ˈvaɪ si, -sə, vaɪs

    an unhealthy or unpleasant habit

    Chocolate and wine are two of my vices.

  2. viceˈvaɪ si, -sə, vaɪs

    behavior or crimes that are immoral

    investigation of vice

Webster Dictionary

  1. Vice(noun)

    a defect; a fault; an error; a blemish; an imperfection; as, the vices of a political constitution; the vices of a horse

  2. Vice(noun)

    a moral fault or failing; especially, immoral conduct or habit, as in the indulgence of degrading appetites; customary deviation in a single respect, or in general, from a right standard, implying a defect of natural character, or the result of training and habits; a harmful custom; immorality; depravity; wickedness; as, a life of vice; the vice of intemperance

  3. Vice(noun)

    the buffoon of the old English moralities, or moral dramas, having the name sometimes of one vice, sometimes of another, or of Vice itself; -- called also Iniquity

  4. Vice(noun)

    a kind of instrument for holding work, as in filing. Same as Vise

  5. Vice(noun)

    a tool for drawing lead into cames, or flat grooved rods, for casements

  6. Vice(noun)

    a gripe or grasp

  7. Vice(verb)

    to hold or squeeze with a vice, or as if with a vice

  8. Vice

    in the place of; in the stead; as, A. B. was appointed postmaster vice C. D. resigned

  9. Vice

    denoting one who in certain cases may assume the office or duties of a superior; designating an officer or an office that is second in rank or authority; as, vice president; vice agent; vice consul, etc

Freebase

  1. Vice

    Vice is a North American magazine that is focused on international arts, culture, and news topics. The publication is available free of charge in twenty-eight countries and is financed by advertising. Jesse Pearson was Vice's editor-in-chief for eight years, until his resignation in December 2010. As of March 2013, the magazine's editor-in-chief is Rocco Castoro and its global editor is documentary filmmaker Andy Capper. In April 2013, the Vice YouTube channel displayed over 2,000,000 subscribers.


Translations for vice

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

vice(noun)

a serious moral fault

Continual lying is a vice.

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