Definitions for viceˈvaɪ si, -sə, vaɪs

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word vice

Princeton's WordNet

  1. frailty, vice(noun)

    moral weakness

  2. vice(noun)

    a specific form of evildoing

    "vice offends the moral standards of the community"

Webster Dictionary

  1. Vice(noun)

    a defect; a fault; an error; a blemish; an imperfection; as, the vices of a political constitution; the vices of a horse

  2. Vice(noun)

    a moral fault or failing; especially, immoral conduct or habit, as in the indulgence of degrading appetites; customary deviation in a single respect, or in general, from a right standard, implying a defect of natural character, or the result of training and habits; a harmful custom; immorality; depravity; wickedness; as, a life of vice; the vice of intemperance

  3. Vice(noun)

    the buffoon of the old English moralities, or moral dramas, having the name sometimes of one vice, sometimes of another, or of Vice itself; -- called also Iniquity

  4. Vice(noun)

    a kind of instrument for holding work, as in filing. Same as Vise

  5. Vice(noun)

    a tool for drawing lead into cames, or flat grooved rods, for casements

  6. Vice(noun)

    a gripe or grasp

  7. Vice(verb)

    to hold or squeeze with a vice, or as if with a vice

  8. Vice

    in the place of; in the stead; as, A. B. was appointed postmaster vice C. D. resigned

  9. Vice

    denoting one who in certain cases may assume the office or duties of a superior; designating an officer or an office that is second in rank or authority; as, vice president; vice agent; vice consul, etc

  10. Origin: [See Vise.]

Freebase

  1. Vice

    Vice is a North American magazine that is focused on international arts, culture, and news topics. The publication is available free of charge in twenty-eight countries and is financed by advertising. Jesse Pearson was Vice's editor-in-chief for eight years, until his resignation in December 2010. As of March 2013, the magazine's editor-in-chief is Rocco Castoro and its global editor is documentary filmmaker Andy Capper. In April 2013, the Vice YouTube channel displayed over 2,000,000 subscribers.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Vice

    Vise, vīs, n. an iron or wooden screw-press, fixed to the edge of a workboard, for holding anything tightly while being filed, &c.: (Shak.) a grip, grasp.—v.t. to screw. [Fr. vis (It. vite, screw)—L. vitis, tendril of a vine, anything spiral.]

  2. Vice

    vīs, n. a blemish or fault: immoral conduct: depravity of manners: a bad trick or habit in a horse: mischievousness: the stock buffoon in the old English Moralities or moral plays.—n. Vicios′ity.—adj. Vicious (vish′us).adv. Vic′iously.—n. Vic′iousness.—Vicious circle, syllogism, circular or erroneous reasoning; Vicious intromission (see Intromit). [Fr.,—L. vitium, a blemish.]

  3. Vice

    vīs, prep. in the place of: also a prefix denoting in the compound word one who acts in place of or is second in rank to another.—n. a vice-chairman, &c.: one who acts in place of a superior.—ns. Vice′-ad′miral, one acting in the place of, or second in command to, an admiral; Vice′-ad′miralty, the office of a vice-admiral—(Vice′-ad′miralty courts, tribunals in the British colonies, having jurisdiction over maritime causes); Vice′-chair′man, an alternate chairman; Vice′-chair′manship; Vice′-chan′cellor, one acting for a chancellor: a lower judge of Chancery; (R.C. Church) the cardinal whose duty it is to draft and despatch papal bulls and briefs; Vice′-chan′cellorship; Vice′-con′sul, one who acts in a consul's place: a consul in a less important district; Vice′-con′sulship; Vice-dean′, a canon chosen to represent an absent dean; Vicegē′rency, the office of a vicegerent, deputed power.—adj. Vicegē′rent, acting in place of another, having delegated authority.—n. one acting in place of a superior.—ns. Vice′-gov′ernor, deputy governor; Vice′-king, one who acts in place of a king; Vice′-pres′idency, -pres′identship; Vice′-pres′ident, an officer next in rank below the president; Vice′-prin′cipal, assistant principal.—adj. Vicerē′gal.—ns. Vicerē′gency; Vice′roy, Vicerē′gent, one representing the royal authority in a dependency, as in India; Viceroy′alty, Vice′royship. [L., 'in the place of,' abl. of vicis (gen.), change.]

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of vice in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of vice in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Sample Sentences & Example Usage

  1. Orson Welles:

    Gluttony is not a secret vice.

  2. Dick Harpootlian:

    Unless Vice President Biden gets in.

  3. Victor Buono:

    My only aversion to vice, is the price.

  4. Michel de Montaigne:

    Ambition is not a vice of little people.

  5. Edith Sitwell:

    Good taste is the worst vice ever invented.

Images & Illustrations of vice


Translations for vice

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