Definitions for shireˈʃi reɪ

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word shire

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

shireʃaɪər(n.)

  1. one of the counties of Great Britain.

    Category: Geography (places)

  2. the Shires, the counties in the Midlands in which hunting is esp. popular.

    Category: Geography (places)

Origin of shire:

bef. 900; ME; OE scīr office of administration, county

Shireʃaɪər(n.)

  1. one of an English breed of large, strong draft horses having a brown or bay coat with feathering on the legs.

    Category: Dogs, Cats, and Horses

Origin of Shire:

1875–80

Shi•réˈʃi reɪ(n.)

  1. a river in SE Africa, flowing S from Lake Malawi to the Zambezi River. 370 mi. (596 km) long.

    Category: Geography (places)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. shire(noun)

    a former administrative district of England; equivalent to a county

  2. shire, shire horse(noun)

    British breed of large heavy draft horse

Wiktionary

  1. shire(Noun)

    Former administrative area of Britain; a county.

    Yorkshire is the largest shire in England.

  2. shire(Noun)

    The general area in which a person lives, used in the context of travel within the UK:

    "When are you coming back to the shire?"

  3. shire(Noun)

    A rural or outer suburban local government area of Australia.

  4. shire(Noun)

    A shire horse

Webster Dictionary

  1. Shire(noun)

    a portion of Great Britain originally under the supervision of an earl; a territorial division, usually identical with a county, but sometimes limited to a smaller district; as, Wiltshire, Yorkshire, Richmondshire, Hallamshire

  2. Shire(noun)

    a division of a State, embracing several contiguous townships; a county

Freebase

  1. Shire

    A shire is a traditional term for a division of land, found in the United Kingdom and in Australia. In parts of Australia, a shire is an administrative unit, but it is not synonymous with "county" there, which is a land registration unit. Individually, or as a suffix in Scotland and in the far northeast of England, the word is pronounced. As a suffix in an English or Welsh place name, it is in most regions pronounced, or sometimes. In Britain, "shire" is the original term for what is usually known as a county; the word county having been introduced at the Norman Conquest of England. The two are synonymous. Although in modern British usage counties are referred to as "shires" mainly in poetic contexts, terms such as Shire Hall remain common. Shire also remains a common part of many county names. The word derives from the Old English scir, itself a derivative of the Proto-Germanic skizo, meaning care or official charge. The system was first used in Wessex from the beginning of Anglo-Saxon settlement, and spread to most of the rest of England in the tenth century, along with West Saxon political control. In Domesday the city of York was divided into shires. The first shires of Scotland were created in English-settled areas such as Lothian and the Borders, in the ninth century. King David I more consistently created shires and appointed sheriffs across lowland shores of Scotland.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Shiré

    a river of East Africa, flows out of Lake Nyassa, and passes in a southerly course through the Shiré Highlands, a distance of 370 m., till it joins the Zambesi; discovered by Livingstone.

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