Definitions for quine

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word quine

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Quine, W. V. Quine, Willard Van Orman Quine(noun)

    United States philosopher and logician who championed an empirical view of knowledge that depended on language (1908-2001)

Wiktionary

  1. quine(Noun)

    A program that produces its own source code as output.

  2. quine(Verb)

    To deny the existence or significance of something obviously real or important.

  3. Origin: From the name of the logician Willard van Orman Quine, via Douglas Hofstadter.

Freebase

  1. Quine

    A quine is a computer program which takes no input and produces a copy of its own source code as its only output. The standard terms for these programs in the computability theory and computer science literature are self-replicating programs, self-reproducing programs, and self-copying programs. A quine is a fixed point of an execution environment, when the execution environment is viewed as a function. Quines are possible in any programming language that has the ability to output any computable string, as a direct consequence of Kleene's recursion theorem. For amusement, programmers sometimes attempt to develop the shortest possible quine in any given programming language. The name "quine" was coined by Douglas Hofstadter, in his popular science book Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, in the honor of philosopher Willard Van Orman Quine, who made an extensive study of indirect self-reference, and in particular for the following paradox-producing expression, known as Quine's paradox: "Yields falsehood when preceded by its quotation" yields falsehood when preceded by its quotation. In some languages, an empty source file is a fixed point of the language, producing no output. Such an empty program, submitted as "the world's smallest self reproducing program", once won the "worst abuse of the rules" prize in the International Obfuscated C Code Contest.

The New Hacker's Dictionary

  1. quine

    [from the name of the logician Willard van Orman Quine, via Douglas Hofstadter] A program that generates a copy of its own source text as its complete output. Devising the shortest possible quine in some given programming language is a common hackish amusement. (We ignore some variants of BASIC in which a program consisting of a single empty string literal reproduces itself trivially.) Here is one classic quine: ((lambda (x) (list x (list (quote quote) x))) (quote (lambda (x) (list x (list (quote quote) x))))) This one works in LISP or Scheme. It's relatively easy to write quines in other languages such as Postscript which readily handle programs as data; much harder (and thus more challenging!) in languages like C which do not. Here is a classic C quine for ASCII machines: char*f="char*f=%c%s%c;main() {printf(f,34,f,34,10);}%c"; main(){printf(f,34,f,34,10);} For excruciatingly exact quinishness, remove the interior line breaks. Here is another elegant quine in ANSI C: #define q(k)main(){return!puts(#k" q("#k")");} q(#define q(k)main(){return!puts(#k" q("#k")");}) Some infamous Obfuscated C Contest entries have been quines that reproduced in exotic ways. There is an amusing Quine Home Page.


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