Definitions for melodramaˈmɛl əˌdrɑ mə, -ˌdræm ə

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word melodrama

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

mel•o•dra•maˈmɛl əˌdrɑ mə, -ˌdræm ə(n.)(pl.)-mas.

  1. a dramatic form that exaggerates emotion and emphasizes plot or action over characterization.

    Category: Showbiz, Literature

  2. melodramatic behavior or events.

  3. (in the 17th–early 19th centuries) a romantic drama with music interspersed.

    Category: Showbiz, Music and Dance, Literature

Origin of melodrama:

1800–10; < F mélodrame=mélo- (< Gk mélos song) +dramedrama

mel`o•dram′a•tist-ˈdræm ə tɪst, -ˈdrɑ mə-(n.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. melodrama(noun)

    an extravagant comedy in which action is more salient than characterization

Wiktionary

  1. melodrama(Noun)

    A kind of drama having a musical accompaniment to intensify the effect of certain scenes.

  2. melodrama(Noun)

    A drama abounding in romantic sentiment and agonizing situations, with a musical accompaniment only in parts which are especially thrilling or pathetic. In opera, a passage in which the orchestra plays a somewhat descriptive accompaniment, while the actor speaks; as, the melodrama in the grave digging scene of Beethoven's "Fidelio".

  3. melodrama(Noun)

    Any situation or action which is blown out of proportion.

  4. Origin: From the melodramma, the second element refashioned by analogy with drama, which the dramma represents both etymologically and semantically; ultimately, both the and the represent a supposed etymon of the form *, from the extant roots and ; compare melodrame, the mélodrame, the Melodram, and the melodrama.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Melodrama(noun)

    formerly, a kind of drama having a musical accompaniment to intensify the effect of certain scenes. Now, a drama abounding in romantic sentiment and agonizing situations, with a musical accompaniment only in parts which are especially thrilling or pathetic. In opera, a passage in which the orchestra plays a somewhat descriptive accompaniment, while the actor speaks; as, the melodrama in the gravedigging scene of Beethoven's "Fidelio"

Freebase

  1. Melodrama

    The term melodrama refers to a dramatic work that exaggerates plot and characters in order to appeal to the emotions. It may also refer to the genre which includes such works, or to language, behavior, or events which resemble them. It is usually based around having the same character traits, for example a hero, heroine, villain and villain's sidekick. It is also used in scholarly and historical musical contexts to refer to dramas of the 18th and 19th centuries in which orchestral music or song was used to accompany the action. The term originated from the early 19th-century French word mélodrame, which is derived from Greek melos, music, and French drame, drama.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Melodrama

    a play consisting of sensational incidents, and arranged to produce striking effects.


Translations for melodrama

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

melodrama(noun)

a (type of) play in which emotions and the goodness or wickedness of the characters are exaggerated greatly.

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"melodrama." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 23 Jul 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/melodrama>.

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