Definitions for kumquatˈkʌm kwɒt

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word kumquat

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

kum•quatˈkʌm kwɒt(n.)

or cum•quat

  1. a small, orange-colored citrus fruit with a sweet rind and acid pulp, eaten chiefly as a preserve.

    Category: Plants

  2. any shrub of the genus Fortunella, of the rue family, that bears this fruit.

    Category: Plants

Origin of kumquat:

1865–70; < dial. Chin (Guangdong) gāmgwāt gold citrus fruit

Princeton's WordNet

  1. kumquat, cumquat, kumquat tree(noun)

    any of several trees or shrubs of the genus Fortunella bearing small orange-colored edible fruits with thick sweet-flavored skin and sour pulp

  2. kumquat(noun)

    small oval citrus fruit with thin sweet rind and very acid pulp

Wiktionary

  1. kumquat(Noun)

    A small, orange citrus-like fruit which is native to Asia.

  2. Origin: From 柑橘 or 金橘. Related to loquat – same second character.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Kumquat(noun)

    a small tree of the genus Citrus (C. Japonica) growing in China and Japan; also, its small acid, orange-colored fruit used for preserves

Freebase

  1. Kumquat

    Kumquats or cumquats are a group of small fruit-bearing trees in the flowering plant family Rutaceae, either forming the genus Fortunella, or placed within Citrus sensu lato. The edible fruit closely resembles that of the orange, but it is much smaller and ovular, being approximately the size and shape of a large olive. The English name "kumquat" derives from the Cantonese pronunciation gam1 gwat1. They are slow-growing evergreen shrubs or short trees, from 2.5 to 4.5 meters tall, with dense branches, sometimes bearing small thorns. The leaves are dark glossy green, and the flowers white, similar to other citrus flowers, borne singly or clustered in the leaf-axils. Depending on size, the kumquat tree can produce hundreds or even thousands of fruits each year. The tree can be hydrophytic, grown in water, with the fruit often found floating on water near shore during the ripe season. The plant is native to south Asia and the Asia-Pacific region. The earliest historical reference to kumquats appears in literature of China in the 12th century. They have long been cultivated in Japan, Taiwan, the Philippines, and southeast Asia. They were introduced to Europe in 1846 by Robert Fortune, collector for the London Horticultural Society, and shortly thereafter into North America.

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