Definitions for jansenismˈdʒæn səˌnɪz əm

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word jansenism

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

Jan•sen•ismˈdʒæn səˌnɪz əm(n.)

  1. the doctrinal system of Cornelis Jansen, denying free will and maintaining that human nature is corrupt and that Christ died for the elect and not for all people: condemned as heretical by the Catholic Chruch.

    Category: Religion

Origin of Jansenism:

1650–60; < F jansénisme

Jan`sen•is′tic(adj.)

Jan`sen•is′ti•cal(adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Jansenism(noun)

    the Roman Catholic doctrine of Cornelis Jansen and his disciples; salvation is limited to those who are subject to supernatural determinism and the rest are assigned to perdition

Wiktionary

  1. Jansenism(Noun)

    The Catholic doctrines of Cornelius Jansen and his followers, which emphasise original sin, divine grace and predestination.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Jansenism(noun)

    the doctrine of Jansen regarding free will and divine grace

Freebase

  1. Jansenism

    Jansenism was a Christian theological movement, primarily in France, that emphasized original sin, human depravity, the necessity of divine grace, and predestination. The movement originated from the posthumously published work of the Dutch theologian Cornelius Jansen, who died in 1638. It was first popularized by Jansen's friend Jean du Vergier, Abbé de Saint-Cyran, and after Saint-Cyran's death in 1643 was led by Antoine Arnauld. Through the 17th and into the 18th centuries, Jansenism was a distinct movement within the Catholic Church. The theological centre of the movement was the Parisian convent of Port-Royal, which was a haven for writers including Saint-Cyran, Arnauld, Pierre Nicole, Blaise Pascal, and Jean Racine. Jansenism was opposed by many in the Catholic hierarchy, especially the Jesuits. Although the Jansenists identified themselves only as rigorous followers of Augustinism, Jesuits coined the term "Jansenism" to identify them as having Calvinist affinities. The papal bull Cum occasione, issued by Pope Innocent X in 1653, condemned five cardinal doctrines of Jansenism as heresy — especially the relationship between human free will and efficacious grace, wherein the teachings of Augustine, as presented by the Jansenists, contradicted the teachings of the Jesuit School. Jansenist leaders endeavored to accommodate the pope's pronouncements while retaining their distinctives, and enjoyed a measure of peace in the late 17th century under Pope Clement IX. However, further controversy led to the bull Unigenitus, issued by Clement XI in 1713, which marked the end of Catholic toleration of Jansenist doctrine.

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