Definitions for hackhæk

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word hack

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

hackhæk(v.t.)

  1. to cut, notch, slice, chop, or sever with irregular, often heavy blows (often fol. by up or down):

    to hack down trees.

  2. to clear (a road, path, etc.) by cutting away vines, trees, or other growth.

  3. to damage or injure by crude, harsh, or insensitive treatment, as a piece of writing.

  4. to reduce or cut ruthlessly; trim:

    to hack a budget severely.

  5. Slang. to deal or cope with; handle; tolerate:

    I can't hack all this commuting.

    Category: Common Vocabulary, Status (usage)

  6. (v.i.)to make rough cuts or notches.

  7. to cough harshly, usu. in short and repeated spasms.

  8. (n.)a cut, gash, or notch.

  9. a tool for hacking, as an ax or pick.

    Category: Building Trades

  10. an act or instance of hacking; a cutting blow.

  11. a short, rasping dry cough.

    Category: Pathology

Idioms for hack:

  1. hack it,Slang. to cope successfully with something.

    Category: Idiom, Status (usage)

Origin of hack:

1150–1200; ME hacken; cf. OE tōhaccian to hack to pieces, c. MLG, MD, MHG hacken

hackhæk(n.)

  1. a person, esp. a professional, who surrenders individual independence, integrity, belief, etc., in return for money or other reward:

    a political hack.

  2. a writer whose services are for hire.

  3. a person who produces banal or mediocre work or who works at a dull or routine task.

  4. a horse kept for common hire or adapted for general work, esp. ordinary riding.

  5. a saddle horse.

  6. an old or worn-out horse; jade.

  7. a coach or carriage kept for hire; hackney.

  8. a taxicab. a cabdriver.

    Category: Informal

  9. (v.t.)to make a hack of; let out for hire.

  10. to make trite or stale by frequent use; hackney.

  11. (v.i.)to drive a taxi.

    Category: Informal

  12. to ride or drive on the road at an ordinary pace.

  13. (adj.)hired as a hack; of a hired sort:

    a hack writer; hack work.

  14. hackneyed; trite; banal:

    hack writing.

Origin of hack:

1680–90; short for hackney

Princeton's WordNet

  1. hack, drudge, hacker(noun)

    one who works hard at boring tasks

  2. machine politician, ward-heeler, political hack, hack(noun)

    a politician who belongs to a small clique that controls a political party for private rather than public ends

  3. hack, hack writer, literary hack(noun)

    a mediocre and disdained writer

  4. hack(noun)

    a tool (as a hoe or pick or mattock) used for breaking up the surface of the soil

  5. cab, hack, taxi, taxicab(noun)

    a car driven by a person whose job is to take passengers where they want to go in exchange for money

  6. hack, jade, nag, plug(noun)

    an old or over-worked horse

  7. hack(noun)

    a horse kept for hire

  8. hack(verb)

    a saddle horse used for transportation rather than sport etc.

  9. chop, hack(verb)

    cut with a hacking tool

  10. hack, cut(verb)

    be able to manage or manage successfully

    "I can't hack it anymore"; "she could not cut the long days in the office"

  11. hack(verb)

    cut away

    "he hacked his way through the forest"

  12. hack(verb)

    kick on the arms

  13. hack(verb)

    kick on the shins

  14. hack, hack on(verb)

    fix a computer program piecemeal until it works

    "I'm not very good at hacking but I'll give it my best"

  15. hack, cut up(verb)

    significantly cut up a manuscript

  16. hack, whoop(verb)

    cough spasmodically

    "The patient with emphysema is hacking all day"

Webster Dictionary

  1. Hack(noun)

    a frame or grating of various kinds; as, a frame for drying bricks, fish, or cheese; a rack for feeding cattle; a grating in a mill race, etc

  2. Hack(noun)

    unburned brick or tile, stacked up for drying

  3. Hack(verb)

    to cut irregulary, without skill or definite purpose; to notch; to mangle by repeated strokes of a cutting instrument; as, to hack a post

  4. Hack(verb)

    fig.: To mangle in speaking

  5. Hack(verb)

    to cough faintly and frequently, or in a short, broken manner; as, a hacking cough

  6. Hack(noun)

    a notch; a cut

  7. Hack(noun)

    an implement for cutting a notch; a large pick used in breaking stone

  8. Hack(noun)

    a hacking; a catch in speaking; a short, broken cough

  9. Hack(noun)

    a kick on the shins

  10. Hack(noun)

    a horse, hackneyed or let out for common hire; also, a horse used in all kinds of work, or a saddle horse, as distinguished from hunting and carriage horses

  11. Hack(noun)

    a coach or carriage let for hire; particularly, a a coach with two seats inside facing each other; a hackney coach

  12. Hack(noun)

    a bookmaker who hires himself out for any sort of literary work; an overworked man; a drudge

  13. Hack(noun)

    a procuress

  14. Hack(adj)

    hackneyed; hired; mercenary

  15. Hack(verb)

    to use as a hack; to let out for hire

  16. Hack(verb)

    to use frequently and indiscriminately, so as to render trite and commonplace

  17. Hack(verb)

    to be exposed or offered or to common use for hire; to turn prostitute

  18. Hack(verb)

    to live the life of a drudge or hack

Freebase

  1. Hack

    Hack is a television series that aired on the American CBS television network from 2002 to 2004. The show also aired in the UK on ITV3, in Australia on Network Ten, and in France on M6. The final four episodes of Season One were never aired in the UK as ITV3 allowed their broadcast rights to lapse before they were shown. The series centers on the fictional life of a former police officer, Polish-American Mike Olshansky, who left the force after being charged with corruption and now works as a taxi driver in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The charges of corruption were never clearly proven but Olshansky, riddled with guilt, considers it his duty to make up for his past wrongs by helping those the police will not help. Olshansky saves many lives and people by going above and beyond the call of duty, becoming a kind of heroic vigilante. He receives "inside" help from within the police force from his friend Marcellus Washington, played by Andre Braugher, who often comes close to risking his own career. Meanwhile, he tries to repair his relationship with his young son, Mikey, and rebuild his life after losing his marriage, his son's admiration, his professional identity, and his reputation. Co-stars Jacqueline Torres as Olshanshky's neighbor, and George Dzundza as long-time priest and confidant.

The New Hacker's Dictionary

  1. hack

    [very common] 1. n. Originally, a quick job that produces what is needed, but not well. 2. n. An incredibly good, and perhaps very time-consuming, piece of work that produces exactly what is needed. 3. vt. To bear emotionally or physically. “I can't hack this heat!” 4. vt. To work on something (typically a program). In an immediate sense: “What are you doing?” “I'm hacking TECO.” In a general (time-extended) sense: “What do you do around here?” “I hack TECO.” More generally, “I hack foo” is roughly equivalent to “foo is my major interest (or project)”. “I hack solid-state physics.” See Hacking X for Y. 5. vt. To pull a prank on. See sense 2 and hacker (sense 5). 6. vi. To interact with a computer in a playful and exploratory rather than goal-directed way. “Whatcha up to?” “Oh, just hacking.” 7. n. Short for hacker. 8. See nethack. 9. [MIT] v. To explore the basements, roof ledges, and steam tunnels of a large, institutional building, to the dismay of Physical Plant workers and (since this is usually performed at educational institutions) the Campus Police. This activity has been found to be eerily similar to playing adventure games such as Dungeons and Dragons and Zork. See also vadding.Constructions on this term abound. They include happy hacking (a farewell), how's hacking? (a friendly greeting among hackers) and hack, hack (a fairly content-free but friendly comment, often used as a temporary farewell). For more on this totipotent term see The Meaning of Hack. See also neat hack, real hack.


Translations for hack

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

hack(noun)

a rough cut made in something

He marked the tree by making a few hacks on the trunk.

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