Definitions for dna

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word dna

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

DNA

  1. deoxyribonucleic acid: an extremely long, double-stranded nucleic acid molecule arranged as a double helix that is the main constituent of the chromosome and that carries the genes as segments along its strands: found chiefly in the chromatin of cells and in many viruses.

    Category: Genetics

Origin of DNA:

1930–35

Princeton's WordNet

  1. deoxyribonucleic acid, desoxyribonucleic acid, DNA(noun)

    (biochemistry) a long linear polymer found in the nucleus of a cell and formed from nucleotides and shaped like a double helix; associated with the transmission of genetic information

    "DNA is the king of molecules"

Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

  1. DNA(noun)ˈdɪz i

    the chemical carrying genetic information in cells

    DNA sample/tests

Wiktionary

  1. DNA(Noun)

    A substance in living beings which determines their form, and can be used to uniquely identify a person.

  2. DNA(Noun)

    A biopolymer of deoxyribonucleic acids (a type of nucleic acid) that has four different chemical groups, called bases: adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine.

Freebase

  1. DNA

    Deoxyribonucleic acid is a molecule that encodes the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms and many viruses. Along with RNA and proteins, DNA is one of the three major macromolecules essential for all known forms of life. Genetic information is encoded as a sequence of nucleotides recorded using the letters G, A, T, and C. Most DNA molecules are double-stranded helices, consisting of two long polymers of simple units called nucleotides, molecules with backbones made of alternating sugars and phosphate groups, with the nucleobases attached to the sugars. DNA is well-suited for biological information storage, since the DNA backbone is resistant to cleavage and the double-stranded structure provides the molecule with a built-in duplicate of the encoded information. These two strands run in opposite directions to each other and are therefore anti-parallel, one backbone being 3′ and the other 5′. This refers to the direction the 3rd and 5th carbon on the sugar molecule is facing. Attached to each sugar is one of four types of molecules called nucleobases. It is the sequence of these four nucleobases along the backbone that encodes information. This information is read using the genetic code, which specifies the sequence of the amino acids within proteins. The code is read by copying stretches of DNA into the related nucleic acid RNA in a process called transcription.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. DNA

    A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'dna' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2927

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'dna' in Nouns Frequency: #1282

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