Definitions for cuttlefishˈkʌt lˌfɪʃ

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word cuttlefish

Princeton's WordNet

  1. cuttlefish, cuttle(noun)

    ten-armed oval-bodied cephalopod with narrow fins as long as the body and a large calcareous internal shell


  1. cuttlefish(Noun)

    Any of various squidlike cephalopod marine mollusks of the genus Sepia that have ten arms and a calcareous internal shell and eject a dark inky fluid when in danger.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Cuttlefish(noun)

    a cephalopod of the genus Sepia, having an internal shell, large eyes, and ten arms furnished with denticulated suckers, by means of which it secures its prey. The name is sometimes applied to dibranchiate cephalopods generally

  2. Cuttlefish(noun)

    a foul-mouthed fellow

  3. Origin: [OE. codule, AS. cudele; akin to G. kuttelfish; cf. G. ktel, D. keutel, dirt from the guts, G. kuttel bowels, entrails. AS. cwi womb, Goth. qius belly, womb.]


  1. Cuttlefish

    Cuttlefish are marine animals of the order Sepiida. They belong to the class Cephalopoda, which also includes squid, octopi, and nautiluses. 'Cuttle' is a reference to their unique internal shell, the cuttlebone. Despite their name, cuttlefish are true molluscs. Cuttlefish have large, W-shaped pupils, eight arms, and two tentacles furnished with denticulated suckers, with which they secure their prey. They generally range in size from 15 to 25 cm, with the largest species, Sepia apama, reaching 50 cm in mantle length and over 10.5 kg in weight. Cuttlefish eat small molluscs, crabs, shrimp, fish, octopuses, worms, and other cuttlefish. Their predators include dolphins, sharks, fish, seals, seabirds, and other cuttlefish. Their life expectancy is about one to two years. Recent studies indicate cuttlefish are among the most intelligent invertebrates. Cuttlefish also have one of the largest brain-to-body size ratios of all invertebrates. The 'cuttle' in 'cuttlefish' comes from the Old English word cudele, meaning 'cuttlefish', which may be cognate with the Old Norse koddi and the Middle Low German küdel. The Greco-Roman world valued the cephalopod as a source of the unique brown pigment the creature releases from its siphon when it is alarmed. The word for it in both Greek and Latin, sepia, is now used to refer to a brown pigment in English.

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