Definitions for corditeˈkɔr daɪt

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word cordite

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

cord•iteˈkɔr daɪt(n.)

  1. a smokeless explosive powder composed of nitroglycerin, cellulose nitrate, and mineral jelly.

    Category: Chemistry

Origin of cordite:

1885–90

Princeton's WordNet

  1. cordite(noun)

    explosive powder (nitroglycerin and guncotton and petrolatum) dissolved in acetone and dried and extruded in brown cords

Wiktionary

  1. cordite(Noun)

    A smokeless propellent made by combining two high explosives, nitrocellulose and nitroglycerine, used in some firearm ammunition.

  2. Origin: From cord (the material is manufactured into short cordlike, 1mm diameter cylinders) + -ite.

Freebase

  1. Cordite

    Cordite is a family of smokeless propellants developed and produced in the United Kingdom from 1889 to replace gunpowder as a military propellant. Like gunpowder, cordite is classified as a low explosive because of its slow burning rates and consequently low brisance. These produce a subsonic deflagration wave rather than the supersonic detonation wave produced by brisants, or high explosives. The hot gases produced by burning gunpowder or cordite generate sufficient pressure to propel a bullet or shell to its target, but not so quickly as to routinely destroy the barrel of the firearm, or gun. Cordite was used initially in the .303 British, Mark I and II, standard rifle cartridge between 1891 and 1915; shortages of cordite in World War I led to United States–developed smokeless powders being imported into the UK for use in rifle cartridges. Cordite was also used for large weapons, such as tank guns, artillery and naval guns. It has been used mainly for this purpose since the late 19th century by the UK and British Commonwealth countries. Its use was further developed before World War II, and as 2-and-3-inch-diameter Unrotated Projectiles for launching anti-aircraft weapons. Small cordite rocket charges were also developed for ejector seats made by the Martin-Baker Company. Cordite was also used in the detonation system of the Little Boy atomic bomb dropped over Hiroshima in August 1945.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Cordite

    a smokeless powder, invented by Sir F. A. Abel, being composed principally of gun-cotton and glycerine.

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