Definitions for copalˈkoʊ pəl, -pæl

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word copal

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

co•palˈkoʊ pəl, -pæl(n.)

  1. a resin obtained from various tropical trees and used in making varnishes.

    Category: Chemistry

Origin of copal:

1570–80; < MexSp < Nahuatl copalli

Princeton's WordNet

  1. copal(noun)

    a brittle aromatic resin used in varnishes

Wiktionary

  1. copal(Noun)

    A resinous exudation from various tropical trees used chiefly in making varnishes and printing ink.

  2. Origin: From copal, from copalli.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Copal

    a resinous substance flowing spontaneously from trees of Zanzibar, Madagascar, and South America (Trachylobium Hornemannianum, T. verrucosum, and Hymenaea Courbaril), and dug from earth where forests have stood in Africa; -- used chiefly in making varnishes

Freebase

  1. Copal

    Copal is a name given to tree resin that is particularly identified with the aromatic resins used by the cultures of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica as ceremonially burned incense and other purposes. More generally, the term copal describes resinous substances in an intermediate stage of polymerization and hardening between "gummier" resins and amber. The word copal is derived from the Nahuatl language word copalli, meaning "incense". To the pre-Columbian Maya and contemporary Maya peoples it is known in the various Mayan languages as pom, although the word itself has been demonstrated to be a loanword to Mayan from Mixe–Zoquean languages. Copal is still used by a number of indigenous peoples of Mexico and Central America as an incense and during sweat lodge ceremonies. It is available in different forms. The hard, amber-like yellow copal is a less expensive version. The white copal, a hard, milky, sticky substance, is a more expensive version of the same resin. Copal was also grown in East Africa, initially feeding an Indian Ocean demand for incense. By the 18th Century, Europeans found it to be a valuable ingredient in making a good wood varnish. It became widely used in the manufacture of furniture and carriages. It was also sometimes used as a picture varnish. By the late 19th and early 20th century varnish manufacturers in England and America were using it on train carriages, greatly swelling its demand.

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