Definitions for casuistryˈkæʒ u ə stri

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word casuistry

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

cas•u•ist•ryˈkæʒ u ə stri(n.)(pl.)-ries.

  1. oversubtle, fallacious, or dishonest reasoning; sophistry.

    Category: Philosphy

  2. the application of general ethical principles to particular cases of conscience or conduct.

    Category: Philosphy

Origin of casuistry:

1715–25

Princeton's WordNet

  1. casuistry(noun)

    argumentation that is specious or excessively subtle and intended to be misleading

  2. casuistry(noun)

    moral philosophy based on the application of general ethical principles to resolve moral dilemmas

Wiktionary

  1. casuistry(Noun)

    The process of answering practical questions via interpretation of rules or cases that illustrate such rules, especially in ethics.

  2. casuistry(Noun)

    A specious argument designed to defend an action or feeling.

  3. Origin: . First recorded use in 1725.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Casuistry(adj)

    the science or doctrine of dealing with cases of conscience, of resolving questions of right or wrong in conduct, or determining the lawfulness or unlawfulness of what a man may do by rules and principles drawn from the Scriptures, from the laws of society or the church, or from equity and natural reason; the application of general moral rules to particular cases

  2. Casuistry(adj)

    sophistical, equivocal, or false reasoning or teaching in regard to duties, obligations, and morals

Freebase

  1. Casuistry

    Casuistry, or case-based reasoning, is a method in applied ethics and jurisprudence, often characterised as a critique of principle- or rule-based reasoning. The word "casuistry" derives from the Latin casus. Casuistry is reasoning used to resolve moral problems by extracting or extending theoretical rules from particular instances and applying these rules to new instances. The term is also commonly used as a pejorative to criticize the use of clever but unsound reasoning, especially in relation to moral questions. The agreed meaning of "casuistry" is in flux. The term can be used either to describe a presumably acceptable form of reasoning or a form of reasoning that is inherently unsound and deceptive. Most or all philosophical dictionaries list the neutral sense as the first or only definition. On the other hand, the Oxford English Dictionary states that the word "[o]ften applied to a quibbling or evasive way of dealing with difficult cases of duty." Its textual references, except for certain technical usages, are consistently pejorative. Most online dictionaries list a pejorative meaning as the primary definition before a neutral one, though Merriam-Webster lists the neutral one first. In journalistic usage, the pejorative use is ubiquitous and examples of the neutral usage are not found.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Casuistry

    A method of ETHICAL ANALYSIS that emphasizes practical problem solving through examining individual cases that are considered to be representative; sometimes used to denote specious argument or rationalization. Differentiate from casuistics, which is the recording and study of cases and disease.

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