Definitions for accelerationækˌsɛl əˈreɪ ʃən

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word acceleration

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

ac•cel•er•a•tionækˌsɛl əˈreɪ ʃən(n.)

  1. the act of accelerating; increase of speed or velocity.

  2. a change in velocity.

  3. the time rate of change of velocity with respect to magnitude or direction; the derivative of velocity with respect to time.

    Category: Mechanics

Origin of acceleration:

1525–35; < L

Princeton's WordNet

  1. acceleration(noun)

    an increase in rate of change

    "modern science caused an acceleration of cultural change"

  2. acceleration, quickening, speedup(noun)

    the act of accelerating; increasing the speed

  3. acceleration(noun)

    (physics) a rate of increase of velocity

Wiktionary

  1. acceleration(Noun)

    The act of accelerating, or the state of being accelerated; increase of motion or action; as opposed to retardation or deceleration.

    a falling body moves toward the earth with an acceleration of velocity

  2. acceleration(Noun)

    The amount by which a speed or velocity increases (and so a scalar quantity or a vector quantity).

    The boosters produce an acceleration of 20 metres per second per second.

  3. acceleration(Noun)

    The change of velocity with respect to time (can include deceleration or changing direction).

  4. Origin: * First attested in 1531.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Acceleration(noun)

    the act of accelerating, or the state of being accelerated; increase of motion or action; as, a falling body moves toward the earth with an acceleration of velocity; -- opposed to retardation

Freebase

  1. Acceleration

    In physics, acceleration is the rate at which the velocity of a body changes with time. In general, velocity and acceleration are vector quantities, with magnitude and direction, though in many cases only magnitude is considered. As described by Newton's Second Law, acceleration is accompanied by a force; the force, as a vector, is the product of the mass of the object being accelerated and the acceleration. The SI unit of acceleration is the meter per second squared. For example, an object such as a car that starts from standstill, then travels in a straight line at increasing speed, is accelerating in the direction of travel. If the car changes direction at constant speedometer reading, there is strictly speaking an acceleration although it is often not so described; passengers in the car will experience a force pushing them back into their seats in linear acceleration, and a sideways force on changing direction. If the speed of the car decreases, it is usual and meaningful to speak of deceleration; mathematically it is acceleration in the opposite direction to that of motion.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Acceleration

    An increase in the rate of speed.

The Standard Electrical Dictionary

  1. Acceleration

    The rate of change of velocity. If of increase of velocity it is positive; if of decrease, it is negative. It can only be brought about by the exercise of force and is used as the measure of or as determining the unit of force. It is equal to velocity (L/T) imparted, divided by time (T); its dimensions therefore are L/(T^2). The c. g. s. unit of acceleration is one centimeter in one second. [Transcriber's note: The unit of acceleration is "centimeters per second per second."]

British National Corpus

  1. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'acceleration' in Written Corpus Frequency: #4387


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