Definitions for absintheˈæb sɪnθ

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word absinthe

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

ab•sintheˈæb sɪnθ(n.)

or ab•sinth

  1. a strong green liqueur made with wormwood and other herbs, having a bitter licorice flavor: now banned in most Western countries.

    Category: Viniculture/Winemaking

Origin of absinthe:

1605–15; < F < L absinthium wormwood < Gk apsínthion

Princeton's WordNet

  1. common wormwood, absinthe, old man, lad's love, Artemisia absinthium(noun)

    aromatic herb of temperate Eurasia and North Africa having a bitter taste used in making the liqueur absinthe

  2. absinth, absinthe(noun)

    strong green liqueur flavored with wormwood and anise

Wiktionary

  1. absinthe(Noun)

    A distilled, highly alcoholic, anise-flavored liquor originally made from grande wormwood, anise, and other herbs.

  2. absinthe(Noun)

    The herb Artemisia absinthium (grande wormwood).

  3. absinthe(Noun)

    A moderate yellow green; absinthe green.

  4. Origin: * First attested in the 15th Century.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Absinthe(noun)

    the plant absinthium or common wormwood

  2. Absinthe(noun)

    a strong spirituous liqueur made from wormwood and brandy or alcohol

Freebase

  1. Absinthe

    Absinthe is historically described as a distilled, highly alcoholic beverage. It is an anise-flavoured spirit derived from botanicals, including the flowers and leaves of Artemisia absinthium, together with green anise, sweet fennel, and other medicinal and culinary herbs. Absinthe traditionally has a natural green colour but may also be colourless. It is commonly referred to in historical literature as "la fée verte". Although it is sometimes mistakenly referred to as a liqueur, absinthe is not traditionally bottled with added sugar, and is therefore classified as a spirit. Absinthe is traditionally bottled at a high level of alcohol by volume, but is normally diluted with water prior to being consumed. Absinthe originated in the canton of Neuchâtel in Switzerland in the late 18th century. It arose to great popularity as an alcoholic drink in late 19th- and early 20th-century France, particularly among Parisian artists and writers. Owing in part to its association with bohemian culture, the consumption of absinthe was opposed by social conservatives and prohibitionists. Ernest Hemingway, Charles Baudelaire, Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Amedeo Modigliani, Vincent van Gogh, Oscar Wilde, Aleister Crowley, Erik Satie and Alfred Jarry were all known absinthe drinkers.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Absinthe

    An extract of absinthium and other bitter herbs, containing 60% alcohol. Prolonged ingestion causes nervousness, convulsions, trismus, amblyopia, optic neuritis, and mental deterioration. (Dorland, 27th ed)

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. ABSINTHE

    From two Latin words, _ad_, and _sinistrum_, meaning "to the bad." If in doubt, try one. (Old adage, "Absinthe makes the jag last longer)."

Translation

Find a translation for the absinthe definition in other languages:

Select another language:

Discuss these absinthe definitions with the community:


Citation

Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"absinthe." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 17 Dec. 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/absinthe>.

Are we missing a good definition for absinthe?


The Web's Largest Resource for

Definitions & Translations


A Member Of The STANDS4 Network


Nearby & related entries:

Alternative searches for absinthe: