Definitions for ULTRAˈʌl trə

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word ULTRA

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

ul•traˈʌl trə(adj.; n.)(pl.)-tras.

  1. (adj.)going beyond what is usual or ordinary; excessive; extreme.

  2. (n.)an extremist, as in politics, religion, or fashion.

Origin of ultra:

1815–25; independent use of ultra -

ultra-

  1. a prefix occurring orig. in loanwords from Latin, with the basic meaning “on the far side of, beyond.” In relation to the base to which it is prefixed, ultra- has the senses “located beyond, on the far side of” (ultramontane; ultraviolet), “carrying to the furthest degree possible, on the fringe of” (ultraleft; ultramodern), “extremely” (ultralight); nouns to which it is added denote objects, properties, etc., that surpass customary norms, or instrumen

Origin of ultra-:

< L ultrā (adv. and prep.) on the far side (of), beyond

Princeton's WordNet

  1. extremist, radical, ultra(adj)

    (used of opinions and actions) far beyond the norm

    "extremist political views"; "radical opinions on education"; "an ultra conservative"

Wiktionary

  1. ultra(Noun)

    An ultra-royalist in France.

  2. ultra(Noun)

    An extremist.

  3. ultra(Noun)

    Code name used by British codebreakers during World War 2 for decrypted information gained from the enemy.

  4. ultra(Adjective)

    Extreme; far beyond the norm.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Ultra(adj)

    going beyond others, or beyond due limit; extreme; fanatical; uncompromising; as, an ultra reformer; ultra measures

  2. Ultra(noun)

    one who advocates extreme measures; an ultraist; an extremist; a radical

Freebase

  1. Ultra

    Ultra was the designation adopted by British military intelligence in June 1941 for wartime signals intelligence obtained by breaking high-level encrypted enemy radio and teleprinter communications at the Government Code and Cypher School at Bletchley Park. Ultra eventually became the standard designation among the western Allies for all such intelligence. The name arose because the intelligence thus obtained was considered more important than that designated by the highest British security classification then used and so was regarded as being Ultra secret. Several other cryptonyms had been used for such intelligence. British intelligence first designated it "Boniface"—presumably to imply that it was the result of human intelligence. The U.S. used the codename "Magic" for its decrypts from Japanese sources. Much of the German cipher traffic was encrypted on the Enigma machine. Used properly, the German military Enigma would have been virtually unbreakable; in practice, shortcomings in operation allowed it to be broken. The term "Ultra" has often been used almost synonymously with "Enigma decrypts". However, Ultra also encompassed decrypts of the German Lorenz SZ 40/42 machines that were used by the German High Command, and the Hagelin machine and other Italian and Japanese ciphers and codes such as PURPLE and JN-25.


Translations for ULTRA

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

ultra-

beyond, as in ultraviolet .

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