Definitions for MACROˈmæk roʊ

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word MACRO

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

mac•roˈmæk roʊ(adj.; n.)(pl.)-ros.

  1. (adj.)very large in scale or capability.

    Category: Common Vocabulary

  2. of or pertaining to macroeconomics.

    Category: Common Vocabulary

  3. (n.)a single computer instruction that represents a sequence of instructions or keystrokes.

    Category: Computers

Origin of macro:

independent use of macro -, or by shortening of words with macro - as initial element; (def. 5 ) shortening of macroinstruction

macro-

  1. a combining form meaning “large” (macromolecule), “abnormally large” (macrocyte), “major, significant” (macroevolution), “not local, extending over a broad area” (macrocosm), “visible to the naked eye” (macrophyte)

    Category: Affix

    Ref: often contrasting with micro- 2

Origin of macro-:

< Gk makro-, comb. form of makrós long

Princeton's WordNet

  1. macro, macro instruction(adj)

    a single computer instruction that results in a series of instructions in machine language

  2. macro(adj)

    very large in scale or scope or capability

Wiktionary

  1. macro(Noun)

    A comparatively human-friendly abbreviation of complicated input to a computer program.

    The pre-processor expands any embedded macros into source code before it is compiled.

  2. macro(Noun)

    macro lens

Freebase

  1. Macro

    A macro in computer science is a rule or pattern that specifies how a certain input sequence should be mapped to a replacement input sequence according to a defined procedure. The mapping process that instantiates a macro use into a specific sequence is known as macro expansion. A facility for writing macros may be provided as part of a software application or as a part of a programming language. In the former case, macros are used to make tasks using the application less repetitive. In the latter case, they are a tool that allows a programmer to enable code reuse or even to design domain-specific languages. Macros are used to make a sequence of computing instructions available to the programmer as a single program statement, making the programming task less tedious and less error-prone. Macros often allow positional or keyword parameters that dictate what the conditional assembler program generates and have been used to create entire programs or program suites according to such variables as operating system, platform or other factors. The term derives from "macro instruction", and such expansions were originally used in generating assembly language code.

The New Hacker's Dictionary

  1. macro

    [techspeak] A name (possibly followed by a formal arg list) that is equated to a text or symbolic expression to which it is to be expanded (possibly with the substitution of actual arguments) by a macro expander. This definition can be found in any technical dictionary; what those won't tell you is how the hackish connotations of the term have changed over time.The term macro originated in early assemblers, which encouraged the use of macros as a structuring and information-hiding device. During the early 1970s, macro assemblers became ubiquitous, and sometimes quite as powerful and expensive as HLLs, only to fall from favor as improving compiler technology marginalized assembler programming (see languages of choice). Nowadays the term is most often used in connection with the C preprocessor, LISP, or one of several special-purpose languages built around a macro-expansion facility (such as TeX or Unix's [nt]roff suite).Indeed, the meaning has drifted enough that the collective macros is now sometimes used for code in any special-purpose application control language (whether or not the language is actually translated by text expansion), and for macro-like entities such as the keyboard macros supported in some text editors (and PC TSR or Macintosh INIT/CDEV keyboard enhancers).

  2. macro

    Large. Opposite of micro-. In the mainstream and among other technical cultures (for example, medical people) this competes with the prefix mega-, but hackers tend to restrict the latter to quantification.

Translation

Find a translation for the MACRO definition in other languages:

Select another language:

Discuss these MACRO definitions with the community:


Citation

Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"MACRO." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 28 Jul 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/MACRO>.

Are we missing a good definition for MACRO?


The Web's Largest Resource for

Definitions & Translations


A Member Of The STANDS4 Network


Nearby & related entries:

Alternative searches for MACRO: