Definitions for FOILfɔɪl

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word FOIL

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

foilfɔɪl(v.t.)

  1. to prevent the success of; frustrate; thwart.

  2. to keep (a person) from succeeding in an enterprise, plan, etc.

  3. (n.)Archaic. a defeat; check; repulse.

Origin of foil:

1250–1300; ME < AF foller, OF fuler to trample, full (cloth)

foil′a•ble(adj.)

foilfɔɪl(n.)

  1. metal in the form of very thin sheets:

    aluminum foil.

    Category: Metallurgy

  2. the metallic backing applied to glass to form a mirror.

    Category: Metallurgy

  3. a thin layer of metal placed under a gem in a closed setting to improve its color or brilliancy.

    Category: Jewelry

  4. a person or thing that makes another seem better by contrast.

  5. an arc or rounded space between cusps.

    Category: Architecture

  6. an airfoil or hydrofoil.

    Category: Aeronautics

  7. (v.t.)to cover or back with foil.

  8. to set off by contrast.

Origin of foil:

1350–1400; ME < OF

foilfɔɪl(n.)

  1. a flexible four-sided rapier having a blunt point.

    Category: Sport

  2. foils, the art or practice of fencing with this weapon, points being made by touching the trunk of the opponent's body with the tip of the weapon.

    Category: Sport

Origin of foil:

1585–95; orig. uncert.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. foil(noun)

    a piece of thin and flexible sheet metal

    "the photographic film was wrapped in foil"

  2. foil, enhancer(noun)

    anything that serves by contrast to call attention to another thing's good qualities

    "pretty girls like plain friends as foils"

  3. hydrofoil, foil(noun)

    a device consisting of a flat or curved piece (as a metal plate) so that its surface reacts to the water it is passing through

    "the fins of a fish act as hydrofoils"

  4. foil, transparency(noun)

    picture consisting of a positive photograph or drawing on a transparent base; viewed with a projector

  5. foil(verb)

    a light slender flexible sword tipped by a button

  6. foil(verb)

    enhance by contrast

    "In this picture, the figures are foiled against the background"

  7. thwart, queer, spoil, scotch, foil, cross, frustrate, baffle, bilk(verb)

    hinder or prevent (the efforts, plans, or desires) of

    "What ultimately frustrated every challenger was Ruth's amazing September surge"; "foil your opponent"

  8. foil(verb)

    cover or back with foil

    "foil mirrors"

Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

  1. foil(noun)ɔɪl

    thin sheets of metal for protecting food

Wiktionary

  1. FOIL(Verb)

    To apply the FOIL algorithm to.

  2. FOIL(ProperNoun)

    A particular algorithm for multiplying two binomials.

  3. foil(Noun)

    A very thin sheet of metal.

  4. foil(Noun)

    Thin aluminium/aluminum (or, formerly, tin) used for wrapping food.

  5. foil

    A thin layer of metal put between a jewel and its setting to make it seem more brilliant.

  6. foil

    In literature, theatre/theater, etc, a character who helps emphasize the traits of the main character.

  7. foil

    Anything that acts to emphasise the characteristics of something.

  8. foil

    A very thin sword with a blunted (or foiled) tip

  9. foil

    A thin, transparent plastic material on which marks are made and projected for the purposes of presentation. See transparency.

  10. foil

    A stylized flower or leaf.

  11. foil

    Shortened form of hydrofoil.

  12. foil(Verb)

    To prevent (something) from being accomplished.

  13. foil(Verb)

    To prevent (someone) from accomplishing something.

  14. foil(Noun)

    The track of an animal.

  15. foil(Verb)

    To multiply two binomials together.

  16. foil

    Shortened form of aerofoil/airfoil.

  17. Origin: of first outer inner last or similar.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Foil(verb)

    to tread under foot; to trample

  2. Foil(verb)

    to render (an effort or attempt) vain or nugatory; to baffle; to outwit; to balk; to frustrate; to defeat

  3. Foil(verb)

    to blunt; to dull; to spoil; as, to foil the scent in chase

  4. Foil(verb)

    to defile; to soil

  5. Foil(noun)

    failure of success when on the point of attainment; defeat; frustration; miscarriage

  6. Foil(noun)

    a blunt weapon used in fencing, resembling a smallsword in the main, but usually lighter and having a button at the point

  7. Foil(noun)

    the track or trail of an animal

  8. Foil(noun)

    a leaf or very thin sheet of metal; as, brass foil; tin foil; gold foil

  9. Foil(noun)

    a thin leaf of sheet copper silvered and burnished, and afterwards coated with transparent colors mixed with isinglass; -- employed by jewelers to give color or brilliancy to pastes and inferior stones

  10. Foil(noun)

    anything that serves by contrast of color or quality to adorn or set off another thing to advantage

  11. Foil(noun)

    a thin coat of tin, with quicksilver, laid on the back of a looking-glass, to cause reflection

  12. Foil(noun)

    the space between the cusps in Gothic architecture; a rounded or leaflike ornament, in windows, niches, etc. A group of foils is called trefoil, quatrefoil, quinquefoil, etc., according to the number of arcs of which it is composed

Freebase

  1. Foil

    In fiction, a foil is a character who contrasts with another character in order to highlight particular qualities of the other character. A foil usually either differs drastically or is extremely similar but with a key difference setting them apart. The concept of a foil is also more widely applied to any comparison that is made to contrast a difference between two things. Thomas F. Gieryn places these uses of literary foils into three categories which Tamara Antoine and Pauline Metze explain as: those that emphasize the heightened contrast, those that operate by exclusion, and those that assign blame. In Pride and Prejudice, Mary's absorption in her studies places her as a foil to her sister Elizabeth Bennet's lively and distracted nature. Similarly, in Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar, the character Brutus has foils in the two characters Cassius and Mark Antony. In the Harry Potter series, Draco Malfoy can be seen as a foil to the Harry Potter character; Professor Snape enables both characters "to experience the essential adventures of self-determination" but they make different choices.


Translations for FOIL

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

foil(noun)

extremely thin sheets of metal that resemble paper

silver foil.

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