Definitions for Adjunctˈædʒ ʌŋkt

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word Adjunct

Princeton's WordNet

  1. adjunct(noun)

    something added to another thing but not an essential part of it

  2. adjunct(noun)

    a person who is an assistant or subordinate to another

  3. adjunct(adj)

    a construction that can be used to extend the meaning of a word or phrase but is not one of the main constituents of a sentence

  4. accessory, adjunct, ancillary, adjuvant, appurtenant, auxiliary(adj)

    furnishing added support

    "an ancillary pump"; "an adjuvant discipline to forms of mysticism"; "The mind and emotions are auxiliary to each other"

  5. adjunct, assistant(adj)

    of or relating to a person who is subordinate to another


  1. adjunct(Noun)

    An appendage; something attached to something else in a subordinate capacity.

  2. adjunct(Noun)

    A person associated with another in a subordinate position.

  3. adjunct(Noun)

    A dispensable phrase in a clause or sentence that amplifies its meaning, such as "for a while" in "I typed for a while".

  4. adjunct(Noun)


  5. adjunct(Adjective)

    Connected in a subordinate function.

  6. adjunct(Adjective)

    Added to a faculty or staff in a secondary position.

  7. Origin: From adiunctus, perfect passive participle of adiungo, from ad + iungo.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Adjunct(adj)

    conjoined; attending; consequent

  2. Adjunct(noun)

    something joined or added to another thing, but not essentially a part of it

  3. Adjunct(noun)

    a person joined to another in some duty or service; a colleague; an associate

  4. Adjunct(noun)

    a word or words added to quality or amplify the force of other words; as, the History of the American Revolution, where the words in italics are the adjunct or adjuncts of "History."

  5. Adjunct(noun)

    a quality or property of the body or the mind, whether natural or acquired; as, color, in the body, judgment in the mind

  6. Adjunct(noun)

    a key or scale closely related to another as principal; a relative or attendant key. [R.] See Attendant keys, under Attendant, a

  7. Origin: [L. adjunctus, p. p. of adjungere. See Adjoin.]


  1. Adjunct

    In linguistics, an adjunct is an optional, or structurally dispensable, part of a sentence, clause, or phrase that, when removed, will not affect the remainder of the sentence except to discard from it some auxiliary information. A more detailed definition of the adjunct emphasizes its attribute as a modifying form, word, or phrase that depends on another form, word, or phrase, being an element of clause structure with adverbial function. An adjunct is not an argument, and an argument is not an adjunct. The argument-adjunct distinction is central in most theories of syntax and semantics. The terminology used to denote arguments and adjuncts can vary depending on the theory at hand. Some dependency grammars, for instance, employ the term circonstant, following Tesnière. The area of grammar that explores the nature of predicates, their arguments, and adjuncts is called valency theory. Predicates have a valence; they determine the number and type of arguments that can or must appear in their environment. The valence of predicates is also investigated in terms of subcategorization.

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