What does PET mean?

Here's a list of possible definitions for the term PET:


Princeton's WordNet

  1. pet(noun)

    a domesticated animal kept for companionship or amusement

  2. darling, favorite, favourite, pet, dearie, deary, ducky(noun)

    a special loved one

  3. pet(noun)

    a fit of petulance or sulkiness (especially at what is felt to be a slight)

  4. positron emission tomography, PET(adj)

    using a computerized radiographic technique to examine the metabolic activity in various tissues (especially in the brain)

  5. favored, favorite(a), favourite(a), best-loved, pet, preferred, preferent(verb)

    preferred above all others and treated with partiality

    "the favored child"

  6. pet(verb)

    stroke or caress gently

    "pet the lamb"

  7. pet(verb)

    stroke or caress in an erotic manner, as during lovemaking

GCIDE

  1. pet(n.)

    Any animal kept as a companion, usually in or around one's home, typically domesticated and cared for attentively and often affectionately. Distinguished from animals raised for food or to perform useful tasks, as a draft animal or a farm animal.

  2. Origin: [Formerly peat, perhaps from Ir. peat, akin to Gael. peata.]

Wikipedia

  1. Pet

    A pet, or companion animal, is an animal kept primarily for a person's company or entertainment rather than as a working animal, livestock or a laboratory animal. Popular pets are often considered to have attractive appearances, intelligence and relatable personalities, but some pets may be taken in on an altruistic basis (such as a stray animal) and accepted by the owner regardless of these characteristics. Two of the most popular pets are dogs and cats; the technical term for a cat lover is an ailurophile and a dog lover a cynophile. Other animals commonly kept include: rabbits; ferrets; pigs; rodents, such as gerbils, hamsters, chinchillas, rats, mice, and guinea pigs; avian pets, such as parrots, passerines and fowls; reptile pets, such as turtles, alligators, crocodiles, lizards, and snakes; aquatic pets, such as fish, freshwater and saltwater snails, amphibians like frogs and salamanders; and arthropod pets, such as tarantulas and hermit crabs. Small pets may be grouped together as pocket pets, while the equine and bovine group include the largest companion animals. Pets provide their owners (or "guardians") both physical and emotional benefits. Walking a dog can provide both the human and the dog with exercise, fresh air and social interaction. Pets can give companionship to people who are living alone or elderly adults who do not have adequate social interaction with other people. There is a medically approved class of therapy animals, mostly dogs or cats, that are brought to visit confined humans, such as children in hospitals or elders in nursing homes. Pet therapy utilizes trained animals and handlers to achieve specific physical, social, cognitive or emotional goals with patients. People most commonly get pets for companionship, to protect a home or property or because of the perceived beauty or attractiveness of the animals. A 1994 Canadian study found that the most common reasons for not owning a pet were lack of ability to care for the pet when traveling (34.6%), lack of time (28.6%) and lack of suitable housing (28.3%), with dislike of pets being less common (19.6%). Some scholars, ethicists and animal rights organizations have raised concerns over keeping pets because of the lack of autonomy and the objectification of non-human animals.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Pet(noun)

    a cade lamb; a lamb brought up by hand

  2. Pet(noun)

    any person or animal especially cherished and indulged; a fondling; a darling; often, a favorite child

  3. Pet(noun)

    a slight fit of peevishness or fretfulness

  4. Pet(adj)

    petted; indulged; admired; cherished; as, a pet child; a pet lamb; a pet theory

  5. Pet(verb)

    to treat as a pet; to fondle; to indulge; as, she was petted and spoiled

  6. Pet(verb)

    to be a pet

  7. Origin: [Perh. for petty cock.]

Freebase

  1. Pet

    A pet is an animal kept for a person's company, as opposed to livestock, laboratory animals, working animals and sport animals which are kept for economic reasons. The most popular pets are noted for their attractive appearances and their loyal or playful personalities. Their pedigree may also be a factor. In some cases pets may also provide their owners with benefits, such as providing companionship to elderly adults who do not have adequate social interaction with other people. While some people believe in the physical and emotional benefits of owning a pet, scientists are currently working to verify these ideas with medical studies. There is now a medically approved class of "therapy animals", mostly dogs, that are brought to visit confined humans. Pet therapy utilizes trained animals and handlers to achieve specific physical, social, cognitive, and emotional goals with patients. Walking a dog can provide both the owner and the dog with exercise, fresh air, and social interaction. The most popular pets are dogs and cats, but there are also rodent pets, such as gerbils, hamsters, chinchillas, fancy rats, and guinea pigs; avian pets, such as canaries, parakeets, and parrots; reptile pets, such as turtles, lizards and snakes; aquatic pets, such as tropical fish and frogs; and arthropod pets, such as tarantulas and hermit crabs.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Pet

    pet, n. any animal tame and fondled: a word of endearment often used to young children: a favourite child: a wilful young woman—also Peat.—adj. indulged: cherished: favourite.—v.t. to treat as a pet: to fondle:—pr.p. pet′ting; pa.t. and pa.p. pet′ted. [Celt., as Ir. peat, Gael. peata.]

  2. Pet

    pet, n. a sudden fit of peevishness or slight passion: ill-humour.—v.i. to be peevish, to sulk. [From the above word.]

Suggested Resources

  1. pet

    Song lyrics by pet -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by pet on the Lyrics.com website.

  2. PET

    What does PET stand for? -- Explore the various meanings for the PET acronym on the Abbreviations.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'PET' in Written Corpus Frequency: #4720

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'PET' in Nouns Frequency: #1943

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of PET in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of PET in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5



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