What does ship mean?

Definitions for ship
ʃɪpship

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word ship.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. shipverb

    a vessel that carries passengers or freight

  2. transport, send, shipverb

    transport commercially

  3. shipverb

    hire for work on a ship

  4. embark, shipverb

    go on board

  5. shipverb

    travel by ship

  6. shipverb

    place on board a ship

    "ship the cargo in the hold of the vessel"

Wikipedia

  1. Ship

    A ship is a large watercraft that travels the world's oceans and other sufficiently deep waterways, carrying goods or passengers, or in support of specialized missions, such as defense, research, and fishing. Ships are generally distinguished from boats, based on size, shape, load capacity, and tradition. In the Age of Sail a "ship" was a sailing vessel defined by its sail plan of at least three square rigged masts and a full bowsprit. Ships have supported exploration, trade, warfare, migration, colonization, and science. After the 15th century, new crops that had come from and to the Americas via the European seafarers significantly contributed to the world population growth. Ship transport is responsible for the largest portion of world commerce. As of 2016, there were more than 49,000 merchant ships, totaling almost 1.8 billion dead weight tons. Of these 28% were oil tankers, 43% were bulk carriers, and 13% were container ships.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Shipnoun

    pay; reward

    Etymology: [OE. ship, schip, AS. scip; akin to OFries. skip, OS. scip, D. schip, G. schiff, OHG. scif, Dan. skib, Sw. skeep, Icel. & Goth. skip; of unknown origin. Cf. Equip, Skiff, Skipper.]

  2. Shipnoun

    any large seagoing vessel

    Etymology: [OE. ship, schip, AS. scip; akin to OFries. skip, OS. scip, D. schip, G. schiff, OHG. scif, Dan. skib, Sw. skeep, Icel. & Goth. skip; of unknown origin. Cf. Equip, Skiff, Skipper.]

  3. Shipnoun

    specifically, a vessel furnished with a bowsprit and three masts (a mainmast, a foremast, and a mizzenmast), each of which is composed of a lower mast, a topmast, and a topgallant mast, and square-rigged on all masts. See Illustation in Appendix

    Etymology: [OE. ship, schip, AS. scip; akin to OFries. skip, OS. scip, D. schip, G. schiff, OHG. scif, Dan. skib, Sw. skeep, Icel. & Goth. skip; of unknown origin. Cf. Equip, Skiff, Skipper.]

  4. Shipnoun

    a dish or utensil (originally fashioned like the hull of a ship) used to hold incense

    Etymology: [OE. ship, schip, AS. scip; akin to OFries. skip, OS. scip, D. schip, G. schiff, OHG. scif, Dan. skib, Sw. skeep, Icel. & Goth. skip; of unknown origin. Cf. Equip, Skiff, Skipper.]

  5. Shipverb

    to put on board of a ship, or vessel of any kind, for transportation; to send by water

    Etymology: [OE. ship, schip, AS. scip; akin to OFries. skip, OS. scip, D. schip, G. schiff, OHG. scif, Dan. skib, Sw. skeep, Icel. & Goth. skip; of unknown origin. Cf. Equip, Skiff, Skipper.]

  6. Shipverb

    by extension, in commercial usage, to commit to any conveyance for transportation to a distance; as, to ship freight by railroad

    Etymology: [OE. ship, schip, AS. scip; akin to OFries. skip, OS. scip, D. schip, G. schiff, OHG. scif, Dan. skib, Sw. skeep, Icel. & Goth. skip; of unknown origin. Cf. Equip, Skiff, Skipper.]

  7. Shipverb

    hence, to send away; to get rid of

    Etymology: [OE. ship, schip, AS. scip; akin to OFries. skip, OS. scip, D. schip, G. schiff, OHG. scif, Dan. skib, Sw. skeep, Icel. & Goth. skip; of unknown origin. Cf. Equip, Skiff, Skipper.]

  8. Shipverb

    to engage or secure for service on board of a ship; as, to ship seamen

    Etymology: [OE. ship, schip, AS. scip; akin to OFries. skip, OS. scip, D. schip, G. schiff, OHG. scif, Dan. skib, Sw. skeep, Icel. & Goth. skip; of unknown origin. Cf. Equip, Skiff, Skipper.]

  9. Shipverb

    to receive on board ship; as, to ship a sea

    Etymology: [OE. ship, schip, AS. scip; akin to OFries. skip, OS. scip, D. schip, G. schiff, OHG. scif, Dan. skib, Sw. skeep, Icel. & Goth. skip; of unknown origin. Cf. Equip, Skiff, Skipper.]

  10. Shipverb

    to put in its place; as, to ship the tiller or rudder

    Etymology: [OE. ship, schip, AS. scip; akin to OFries. skip, OS. scip, D. schip, G. schiff, OHG. scif, Dan. skib, Sw. skeep, Icel. & Goth. skip; of unknown origin. Cf. Equip, Skiff, Skipper.]

  11. Shipverb

    to engage to serve on board of a vessel; as, to ship on a man-of-war

    Etymology: [OE. ship, schip, AS. scip; akin to OFries. skip, OS. scip, D. schip, G. schiff, OHG. scif, Dan. skib, Sw. skeep, Icel. & Goth. skip; of unknown origin. Cf. Equip, Skiff, Skipper.]

  12. Shipverb

    to embark on a ship

    Etymology: [OE. ship, schip, AS. scip; akin to OFries. skip, OS. scip, D. schip, G. schiff, OHG. scif, Dan. skib, Sw. skeep, Icel. & Goth. skip; of unknown origin. Cf. Equip, Skiff, Skipper.]

Freebase

  1. Ship

    Since the end of the age of sail a ship has been any large buoyant watercraft. Ships are generally distinguished from boats based on size and cargo or passenger capacity. Ships are used on lakes, seas, and rivers for a variety of activities, such as the transport of people or goods, fishing, entertainment, public safety, and warfare. Historically, a "ship" was a vessel with sails rigged in a specific manner. Ships and boats have developed alongside humanity. In armed conflict and in daily life they have become an integral part of modern commercial and military systems. Fishing boats are used by millions of fishermen throughout the world. Military forces operate vessels for combat and to transport and support forces ashore. Commercial vessels, nearly 35,000 in number, carried 7.4 billion tons of cargo in 2007. Total number of ships as of 2011 is about 104,304. Ships were a key in history's great explorations and scientific and technological development. Navigators such as Zheng He spread such inventions as the compass and gunpowder. Ships have been used for such purposes as colonization and the slave trade, and have served scientific, cultural, and humanitarian needs. After the 16th century, new crops that had come from and to the Americas via the European seafarers significantly contributed to the world's population growth. Maritime transport has shaped the world's economy into today's energy-intensive pattern.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Ship

    ship, n. a vessel having three masts, with tops and yards to each: generally, any large sea-going vessel.—v.t. to put on board a ship: to engage for service on board a ship: to transport by ship: to fix in its place.—v.i. to engage for service on shipboard:—pr.p. ship′ping; pa.t. and pa.p. shipped.—ns. Ship′-bis′cuit, hard biscuit for use on shipboard; Ship′board, the deck or side of a ship; Ship′-boy, a boy that serves on board a ship; Ship′-break′er, one who breaks up vessels no longer fit for sea; Ship′-brok′er, a broker who effects sales, insurance, &c. of ships; Ship′builder, one whose occupation is to construct ships; Ship′building; Ship′-canal′, a canal large enough to admit the passage of sea-going vessels; Ship′-cap′tain, one who commands a ship; Ship′-car′penter, a carpenter who works at shipbuilding; Ship′-chand′ler, a dealer in cordage, canvas, and other ship furniture or stores; Ship′-chand′lery, the business wares of a ship-chandler; Ship′-fē′ver, typhus fever, as common on board crowded ships; Ship′ful, as much or as many as a ship will hold; Ship′-hold′er, a ship-owner; Ship′-lett′er, a letter sent by a vessel which does not carry mails; Ship′-load, the load or cargo of a ship; Ship′man, a sailor:—pl. Ship′men; Ship′master, the captain of a ship; Ship′mate, a companion in the same ship; Ship′ment, act of putting on board ship: embarkation: that which is shipped; Ship′-mon′ey, a tyrannical tax imposed by the king on seaports, revived without authorisation of parliament by Charles I. in 1634-37; Ship′-of-the-line, before steam navigation, a man-of-war large enough to take a place in a line of battle; Ship′-own′er, the owner of a ship or ships.—adj. Shipped (Shak.), furnished with a ship or ships.—ns. Ship′per; Ship′ping, ships collectively: tonnage: (Shak.) a voyage; Ship′ping-āg′ent, the agent of a vessel or line of vessels to whom goods are consigned for shipment.—n.pl. Ship′ping-art′icles, articles of agreement, between the captain and his crew.—ns. Ship′ping-bill, invoice of goods embarked; Ship′ping-mas′ter, the official who witnesses signature by the sailors of the articles of agreement; Ship′ping-off′ice, the office of a shipping-agent, or of a shipping-master; Ship′-pound, a unit of weight in the Baltic ports; Ship′-rail′way, a railway by means of which vessels can be carried overland from one body of water to another.—adjs. Ship′-rigged (naut.), rigged like a ship, having three masts with square sails and spreading yards; Ship′shape, in a seaman-like manner: trim, neat, proper.—ns. Ship's′-hus′band, the owner's agent in the management of a ship; Ship′-tire (Shak.), a sort of head-dress, whether from its streamers or its general likeness to a ship; Ship′-way, the supports forming a sliding-way for the building, repairing, and launching of vessels; Ship′-worm, a genus (Teredo) of worm-like molluscs which perforate and live in timber, lining the cavity or tube with a calcareous encrustation; Ship′wreck, the wreck or destruction of a ship: destruction.—v.t. to destroy on the sea: to make to suffer wreck.—ns. Ship′wright, a wright or carpenter who constructs ships; Ship′yard, a yard where ships are built or repaired.—Ship a sea, to have a wave come aboard; Ship's papers, documents required for the manifestation of the property of a ship and cargo; Ship the oars (see Oar).—About ship! an exclamation to pull in the sheet preparatory to changing a ship's course during a tack; Make shipwreck of, to ruin, destroy; On shipboard, upon or within a ship; Take ship, or shipping, to embark. [A.S. scipscippan, to make—scapan, to shape; Goth. skip, Ice. skip, Ger. schiff.]

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. ship

    [from the Anglo-Saxon scip]. Any craft intended for the purposes of navigation; but in a nautical sense it is a general term for all large square-rigged vessels carrying three masts and a bowsprit--the masts being composed of a lower-mast, top-mast, and topgallant-mast, each of these being provided with tops and yards.--Flag-ship. The ship in which the admiral hoists his flag; whatever the rank of the commander be; all the lieutenants take rank before their class in other ships.--Line-of-battle ship. Carrying upwards of 74 guns.--Ship of war. One which, being duly commissioned under a commissioned officer by the admiralty, wears a pendant. The authority of a gunboat, no superior being present, is equal to that of an admiral.--Receiving ship. The port, guard, or admiral's flag-ship, stationed at any place to receive volunteers, and bear them pro. tem. in readiness to join any ship of war which may want hands.--Store-ship. A vessel employed to carry stores, artillery, and provisions, for the use of a fleet, fortress, or Garrison.--Troop-ship. One appointed to carry troops, formerly called a transport.--Hospital-ship. A vessel fitted up to attend a fleet, and receive the sick and wounded. Scuttles are cut in the sides for ventilation. The sick are under the charge of an experienced surgeon, aided by a staff of assistant-surgeons, a proportional number of assistants, cook, baker, and nurses.--Merchant ship.--A vessel employed in commerce to carry commodities of various sorts from one port to another. (See merchantman.)--Private ship of war. (See privateers,andletters of marque.)--Slaver, or slave-ship. A vessel employed in carrying negro slaves.--To ship. To embark men or merchandise. It also implies to fix anything in its place, as "Ship the oars," i.e. place them in their rowlocks; "Ship capstan-bars." Also, to enter on board, or engage to join a ship.--To ship a sea. A wave breaking over all in a gale. Hence the old saying-- "Sometimes we ship a sea, Sometimes we see a ship." To ship a swab. A colloquialism for mounting an epaulette, or receiving a commission.

Editors Contribution

  1. ship

    A type of vehicle created and designed for use on water.

    The ship was a beautiful design.

    Submitted by MaryC on February 17, 2020  
  2. ship

    To move or transport commodities, goods or products.

    They did ship their goods abroad and it was affordable.

    Submitted by MaryC on March 7, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. SHIP

    What does SHIP stand for? -- Explore the various meanings for the SHIP acronym on the Abbreviations.com website.

Etymology and Origins

  1. Ship

    A tavern sign commemorative of the circumnavigation of the globe by Sir Francis Drake; also a technical term in the printing trade for the compositors working together in a particular room or department, being an abbreviation of “Companionship.”

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'ship' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2451

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'ship' in Written Corpus Frequency: #2226

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'ship' in Nouns Frequency: #667

  4. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'ship' in Verbs Frequency: #829

Anagrams for ship »

  1. Hips

  2. Phis

  3. Pish

How to pronounce ship?

How to say ship in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of ship in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of ship in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of ship in a Sentence

  1. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo:

    Much of the diving operation is actually done by feel, the ship itself is damaged, which makes the investigation of the interior more problematic.

  2. Marshall Allen:

    We thought we would find 'good' and 'bad' hospitals. ... But what we actually found was a quite a bit of variation between surgeons within the same hospital, the surgeon is the captain of the ship.

  3. Maher Yaghi:

    Wireless was strong, wireline was somewhat weak, the ship is definitely moving in the right direction.

  4. Yvette Lewis:

    Being the leader of Iowa Democratic Party when something goes wrong isn't easy, but Tom Perez has steered the ship in the right direction, i am confident that Iowa Democrats will be victorious in 2020.

  5. Saint Jerome:

    An unstable pilot steers a leaking ship, and the blind is leading the blind straight to the pit. The ruler is like the ruled.

Images & Illustrations of ship

  1. shipshipshipshipship

Popularity rank by frequency of use

ship#1#1348#10000

Translations for ship

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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