What does renaissance mean?

Definitions for renaissance
ˌrɛn əˈsɑns, -ˈzɑns, -ˈsɑ̃s, ˈrɛn əˌsɑns, -ˌzɑns, -ˌsɑ̃s; esp. Brit. rɪˈneɪ sənsre·nais·sance

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word renaissance.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Renaissance, Renascencenoun

    the period of European history at the close of the Middle Ages and the rise of the modern world; a cultural rebirth from the 14th through the middle of the 17th centuries

  2. rebirth, Renaissance, Renascencenoun

    the revival of learning and culture

Wiktionary

  1. renaissancenoun

    A rebirth or revival.

  2. renaissancenoun

    The transition period between medieval and modern times, the Renaissance.

  3. Renaissanceadjective

    Of, or relating to the Renaissance.

  4. Renaissanceadjective

    Of, or relating to the style of art or architecture of the Renaissance.

  5. Renaissancenoun

    The 14th century revival of classical art, architecture, literature and learning that originated in Italy and spread throughout Europe over the following two centuries.

  6. Renaissancenoun

    The period of this revival; the transition from medieval to modern times.

  7. Renaissancenoun

    Any similar artistic or intellectual revival.

  8. Etymology: From renaissance.

Wikipedia

  1. Renaissance

    The Renaissance (UK: rin-AY-sənss, US: (listen) REN-ə-sahnss) is a period in European history marking the transition from the Middle Ages to modernity and covering the 15th and 16th centuries, characterized by an effort to revive and surpass ideas and achievements of classical antiquity. It occurred after the Crisis of the Late Middle Ages and was associated with great social change. In addition to the standard periodization, proponents of a "long Renaissance" may put its beginning in the 14th century and its end in the 17th century.The traditional view focuses more on the early modern aspects of the Renaissance and argues that it was a break from the past, but many historians today focus more on its medieval aspects and argue that it was an extension of the Middle Ages. However, the beginnings of the period – the early Renaissance of the 15th century and the Italian Proto-Renaissance from around 1250 or 1300 – overlap considerably with the Late Middle Ages, conventionally dated to c. 1250–1500, and the Middle Ages themselves were a long period filled with gradual changes, like the modern age; and as a transitional period between both, the Renaissance has close similarities to both, especially the late and early sub-periods of either.The intellectual basis of the Renaissance was its version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "man is the measure of all things". This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature. Early examples were the development of perspective in oil painting and the revived knowledge of how to make concrete. Although the invention of metal movable type sped the dissemination of ideas from the later 15th century, the changes of the Renaissance were not uniform across Europe: the first traces appear in Italy as early as the late 13th century, in particular with the writings of Dante and the paintings of Giotto. As a cultural movement, the Renaissance encompassed innovative flowering of Latin and vernacular literatures, beginning with the 14th-century resurgence of learning based on classical sources, which contemporaries credited to Petrarch; the development of linear perspective and other techniques of rendering a more natural reality in painting; and gradual but widespread educational reform. In politics, the Renaissance contributed to the development of the customs and conventions of diplomacy, and in science to an increased reliance on observation and inductive reasoning. Although the Renaissance saw revolutions in many intellectual and social scientific pursuits, as well as the introduction of modern banking and the field of accounting, it is perhaps best known for its artistic developments and the contributions of such polymaths as Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, who inspired the term "Renaissance man".The Renaissance began in the Republic of Florence, one of the many states of Italy. Various theories have been proposed to account for its origins and characteristics, focusing on a variety of factors including the social and civic peculiarities of Florence at the time: its political structure, the patronage of its dominant family, the Medici, and the migration of Greek scholars and their texts to Italy following the Fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Turks. Other major centers were northern Italian city-states such as Venice, Genoa, Milan, Bologna, Rome during the Renaissance Papacy and Naples. From Italy, the Renaissance spread throughout Europe in Flanders, France, Britain, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, Germany, Poland, Hungary (with Beatrice of Naples) and elsewhere. The Renaissance has a long and complex historiography, and, in line with general scepticism of discrete periodizations, there has been much debate among historians reacting to the 19th-century glorification of the "Renaissance" and individual cultural heroes as "Renaissance men", questioning the usefulness of Renaissance as a term and as a historical delineation. Some observers have called into question whether the Renaissance was a cultural "advance" from the Middle Ages, instead seeing it as a period of pessimism and nostalgia for classical antiquity, while social and economic historians, especially of the longue durée, have instead focused on the continuity between the two eras, which are linked, as Panofsky observed, "by a thousand ties".The term rinascita ('rebirth') first appeared in Giorgio Vasari's Lives of the Artists (c. 1550), anglicized as the Renaissance in the 1830s. The word has also been extended to other historical and cultural movements, such as the Carolingian Renaissance (8th and 9th centuries), Ottonian Renaissance (10th and 11th century), and the Renaissance of the 12th century.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Renaissancenoun

    a new birth, or revival

  2. Renaissancenoun

    the transitional movement in Europe, marked by the revival of classical learning and art in Italy in the 15th century, and the similar revival following in other countries

  3. Renaissancenoun

    the style of art which prevailed at this epoch

  4. Etymology: [F., fr. renatre to be born again. Cf. Renascence.]

Freebase

  1. Renaissance

    The Renaissance was a cultural movement that spanned the period roughly from the 14th to the 17th century, beginning in Italy in the Late Middle Ages and later spreading to the rest of Europe. Though availability of paper and the invention of metal movable type sped the dissemination of ideas from the later 15th century, the changes of the Renaissance were not uniformly experienced across Europe. As a cultural movement, it encompassed innovative flowering of Latin and vernacular literatures, beginning with the 14th-century resurgence of learning based on classical sources, which contemporaries credited to Petrarch, the development of linear perspective and other techniques of rendering a more natural reality in painting, and gradual but widespread educational reform. In politics, the Renaissance contributed the development of the conventions of diplomacy, and in science an increased reliance on observation. Historians often argue this intellectual transformation was a bridge between the Middle Ages and the Modern era. Although the Renaissance saw revolutions in many intellectual pursuits, as well as social and political upheaval, it is perhaps best known for its artistic developments and the contributions of such polymaths as Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, who inspired the term "Renaissance man".

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Renaissance

    re-nā′sans, n. a new birth: the period (in the 15th century) at which the revival of arts and letters took place, marking the transition from the Middle Ages to the modern world—hence 'Renaissance architecture,' &c.—adj. relating to the foregoing. [Fr.; cf. Renascent.]

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Renaissance

    the name given to the revolution in literature and art in Europe during the 15th and 16th centuries, caused by the revival of the study of ancient models in the literature and art of Greece and Rome, especially the former, and to the awakening in the cultured classes of the free and broad humanity that inspired them, an epoch which marks the transition from the rigid formality of mediæval to the enlightened freedom of modern times.

Editors Contribution

  1. Renaissance

    the meaning of hi

    the meaning of hi


    Submitted by hisoop on March 3, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. renaissance

    Song lyrics by renaissance -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by renaissance on the Lyrics.com website.

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British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'renaissance' in Nouns Frequency: #2797

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of renaissance in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of renaissance in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Examples of renaissance in a Sentence

  1. White House:

    The president will describe this as one of the rare moments in a country’s history when time stops and the essential is immediately ripped away from the trivial, and that Cobb County Election officials have to ensure January 6th does n’t mark the end of democracy but the beginning of a renaissance for Cobb County Election officials democracy, where Cobb County Election officials stand up for the right to vote and to have that voted counted fairly – not undermined by partisans afraid of who you voted for.

  2. Landmarks Preservation Commission:

    The building is significant architecturally for its intact Renaissance Revival facade that stretches around a corner site and for its steel skeleton-frame construction, features that exemplify the stylistic character and technological advances in skyscraper architecture at the time it was built.

  3. Luis Elizondo:

    The many theories that are arising today make it quite clear that we humans are a resilient, curious species, we have a fundamental desire to understand the complexity of our conscious experience and to extrapolate objective truths that can lead us toward a new renaissance.

  4. Frank Furedi:

    Historically some of the most prosperous societies - Ancient Athens, Renaissance Italy, nineteenth century Britain - were among those that were most oriented towards experimentation and the taking of risks.

  5. Mahshad Amiri:

    We are engaged with the reformist movement not only for its political orientation but also because of its religious revival and renaissance ... We’re looking for more freedom, culture, art, human rights and for better rights for our women.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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