What does raccoon mean?

Definitions for raccoon
ræˈkunrac·coon

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word raccoon.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. raccoonnoun

    the fur of the North American racoon

  2. raccoon, racoonnoun

    an omnivorous nocturnal mammal native to North America and Central America

Wiktionary

  1. raccoonnoun

    A nocturnal omnivore originally living in Northern America, typically with a mixture of gray, brown, and black fur, a mask-like marking around the eyes and a striped tail; Procyon lotor.

    Etymology: From arocoun (1608), from ärähkun, from ärähkuněm ‘he scratches with his hands’.

  2. raccoonnoun

    Any mammal of the genus Procyon.

    Etymology: From arocoun (1608), from ärähkun, from ärähkuněm ‘he scratches with his hands’.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Raccoonnoun

    a North American nocturnal carnivore (Procyon lotor) allied to the bears, but much smaller, and having a long, full tail, banded with black and gray. Its body is gray, varied with black and white. Called also coon, and mapach

    Etymology: [F. raton, prop., a little rat, fr. rat rat, perhaps of German origin. See Rat.]

Freebase

  1. Raccoon

    The raccoon, sometimes spelled racoon, also known as the common raccoon, North American raccoon, northern raccoon and colloquially as coon, is a medium-sized mammal native to North America. The raccoon is the largest of the procyonid family, having a body length of 40 to 70 cm and a body weight of 3.5 to 9 kg. Its grayish coat mostly consists of dense underfur which insulates against cold weather. Two of the raccoon's most distinctive features are its extremely dexterous front paws and its facial mask, which are themes in the mythology of several Native American tribes. Raccoons are noted for their intelligence, with studies showing that they are able to remember the solution to tasks for up to three years. The diet of the omnivorous raccoon, which is usually nocturnal, consists of about 40% invertebrates, 33% plant foods, and 27% vertebrates. The original habitats of the raccoon are deciduous and mixed forests, but due to their adaptability they have extended their range to mountainous areas, coastal marshes, and urban areas, where some homeowners consider them to be pests. As a result of escapes and deliberate introductions in the mid-20th century, raccoons are now also distributed across the European mainland, the Caucasus region and Japan.²

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Raccoon

    Racoon, ra-kōōn′, n. a genus of the bear family of North America, valuable for its fur.—ns. Raccoon′-berr′y, the May apple of the United States; Raccoon′-oys′ter, an oyster growing on the shores of the sea in United States. [Amer. Ind.]

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of raccoon in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of raccoon in Pythagorean Numerology is: 6

Examples of raccoon in a Sentence

  1. Brian Todd:

    We thought it was an extraordinary situation, you see pigeons, you see squirrels, you see the occasional raccoon in the D.C. area, and ... you see deer ... We've never seen anything like this in the middle of town.

  2. Kim Il:

    Foreign eye liners or mascaras stay on even after get into water, but domestic products make raccoon eyes even with just a yawn.

  3. Nikki Reed:

    I learned how to change a cloth diaper on a raccoon, i was maybe 8 or 9.

  4. Ashley Rodgers:

    My daughter was laying on the bed sleeping and I went to take my son to the bathroom, we heard a sound upstairs and we see a raccoon run down the steps. PHILADELPHIA CITY COUNCIL APPROVES BILL TO REMOVE BULLETPROOF GLASS FROM STOREFRONTS.

Images & Illustrations of raccoon

  1. raccoonraccoonraccoonraccoonraccoon

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Translations for raccoon

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    the trait of showing courage and determination in spite of possible loss or injury
    • A. abandon
    • B. helm
    • C. pluck
    • D. evangelist

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