What does psychodynamics mean?

Definitions for psychodynamics
ˌsaɪ koʊ daɪˈnæm ɪkspsy·cho·dy·nam·ics

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word psychodynamics.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. psychodynamicsnoun

    the branch of social psychology that deals with the processes and emotions that determine psychology and motivation

  2. psychodynamicsnoun

    the interrelation of conscious and unconscious processes and emotions that determine personality and motivation

Wiktionary

  1. psychodynamicsnoun

    The dynamic interplay between forces that govern human behaviour.

Wikipedia

  1. Psychodynamics

    Psychodynamics, also known as psychodynamic psychology, in its broadest sense, is an approach to psychology that emphasizes systematic study of the psychological forces underlying human behavior, feelings, and emotions and how they might relate to early experience. It is especially interested in the dynamic relations between conscious motivation and unconscious motivation.The term psychodynamics is also used to refer specifically to the psychoanalytical approach developed by Sigmund Freud (1856–1939) and his followers. Freud was inspired by the theory of thermodynamics and used the term psychodynamics to describe the processes of the mind as flows of psychological energy (libido or psi) in an organically complex brain.There are four major schools of thought regarding psychological treatment: psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, biological, and humanistic treatment. In the treatment of psychological distress, psychodynamic psychotherapy tends to be a less intensive (once- or twice-weekly) modality than the classical Freudian psychoanalysis treatment (of 3–5 sessions per week). Psychodynamic therapies depend upon a theory of inner conflict, wherein repressed behaviours and emotions surface into the patient's consciousness; generally, one's conflict is unconscious.

ChatGPT

  1. psychodynamics

    Psychodynamics is a psychological theory or approach that examines the interplay of various conscious and unconscious mental or emotional forces that determine an individual's personality, behavior, and attitudes. It emphasizes the influence of unconscious elements on human behavior such as instinctual drives, desires, unresolved conflicts, or past experiences. This theory originated from Sigmund Freud's psychoanalysis.

Wikidata

  1. Psychodynamics

    Psychodynamics, also known as dynamic psychology, in its broadest sense, is an approach to psychology that emphasises systematic study of the psychological forces that underlie human behaviour, feelings and emotions and how they might relate to early experience. It is especially interested in the dynamic relations between conscious motivation and unconscious motivation. The term psychodynamics is also used by some to refer specifically to the psychoanalytical approach developed by Sigmund Freud and his followers. Freud was inspired by the theory of thermodynamics and used the term psychodynamics to describe the processes of the mind as flows of psychological energy in an organically complex brain. The use of the term psychodynamics for Freud's successors is confusing though, because some of those successors, in particular John Bowlby, opposed the founding principles of Freud's theory, forming opposing factions. Bowlby's attachment theory, still described as 'psychodynamic' in approach, is widely considered to be the basis of most current research, and to have put the field formerly known as psychoanalysis on a more scientifically based, experimentally testable, footing.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of psychodynamics in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of psychodynamics in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

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"psychodynamics." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 20 Jul 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/psychodynamics>.

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