What does pole mean?

Definitions for pole
poʊlpole

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word pole.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. polenoun

    a long (usually round) rod of wood or metal or plastic

  2. Polenoun

    a native or inhabitant of Poland

  3. polenoun

    one of two divergent or mutually exclusive opinions

    "they are at opposite poles"; "they are poles apart"

  4. perch, rod, polenoun

    a linear measure of 16.5 feet

  5. perch, rod, polenoun

    a square rod of land

  6. pole, celestial polenoun

    one of two points of intersection of the Earth's axis and the celestial sphere

  7. polenoun

    one of two antipodal points where the Earth's axis of rotation intersects the Earth's surface

  8. terminal, polenoun

    a contact on an electrical device (such as a battery) at which electric current enters or leaves

  9. polenoun

    a long fiberglass sports implement used for pole vaulting

  10. pole, magnetic poleverb

    one of the two ends of a magnet where the magnetism seems to be concentrated

  11. punt, poleverb

    propel with a pole

    "pole barges on the river"; "We went punting in Cambridge"

  12. poleverb

    support on poles

    "pole climbing plants like beans"

  13. poleverb

    deoxidize molten metals by stirring them with a wooden pole

Wiktionary

  1. Polenoun

    A person from Poland or of Polish descent.

    Etymology: From Pole.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Polenoun

    a native or inhabitant of Poland; a Polander

    Etymology: [L. polus, Gr. a pivot or hinge on which anything turns, an axis, a pole; akin to to move: cf. F. ple.]

  2. Polenoun

    a long, slender piece of wood; a tall, slender piece of timber; the stem of a small tree whose branches have been removed; as, specifically: (a) A carriage pole, a wooden bar extending from the front axle of a carriage between the wheel horses, by which the carriage is guided and held back. (b) A flag pole, a pole on which a flag is supported. (c) A Maypole. See Maypole. (d) A barber's pole, a pole painted in stripes, used as a sign by barbers and hairdressers. (e) A pole on which climbing beans, hops, or other vines, are trained

    Etymology: [L. polus, Gr. a pivot or hinge on which anything turns, an axis, a pole; akin to to move: cf. F. ple.]

  3. Polenoun

    a measuring stick; also, a measure of length equal to 5/ yards, or a square measure equal to 30/ square yards; a rod; a perch

    Etymology: [L. polus, Gr. a pivot or hinge on which anything turns, an axis, a pole; akin to to move: cf. F. ple.]

  4. Poleverb

    to furnish with poles for support; as, to pole beans or hops

    Etymology: [L. polus, Gr. a pivot or hinge on which anything turns, an axis, a pole; akin to to move: cf. F. ple.]

  5. Poleverb

    to convey on poles; as, to pole hay into a barn

    Etymology: [L. polus, Gr. a pivot or hinge on which anything turns, an axis, a pole; akin to to move: cf. F. ple.]

  6. Poleverb

    to impel by a pole or poles, as a boat

    Etymology: [L. polus, Gr. a pivot or hinge on which anything turns, an axis, a pole; akin to to move: cf. F. ple.]

  7. Poleverb

    to stir, as molten glass, with a pole

    Etymology: [L. polus, Gr. a pivot or hinge on which anything turns, an axis, a pole; akin to to move: cf. F. ple.]

  8. Polenoun

    either extremity of an axis of a sphere; especially, one of the extremities of the earth's axis; as, the north pole

    Etymology: [L. polus, Gr. a pivot or hinge on which anything turns, an axis, a pole; akin to to move: cf. F. ple.]

  9. Polenoun

    a point upon the surface of a sphere equally distant from every part of the circumference of a great circle; or the point in which a diameter of the sphere perpendicular to the plane of such circle meets the surface. Such a point is called the pole of that circle; as, the pole of the horizon; the pole of the ecliptic; the pole of a given meridian

    Etymology: [L. polus, Gr. a pivot or hinge on which anything turns, an axis, a pole; akin to to move: cf. F. ple.]

  10. Polenoun

    one of the opposite or contrasted parts or directions in which a polar force is manifested; a point of maximum intensity of a force which has two such points, or which has polarity; as, the poles of a magnet; the north pole of a needle

    Etymology: [L. polus, Gr. a pivot or hinge on which anything turns, an axis, a pole; akin to to move: cf. F. ple.]

  11. Polenoun

    the firmament; the sky

    Etymology: [L. polus, Gr. a pivot or hinge on which anything turns, an axis, a pole; akin to to move: cf. F. ple.]

  12. Polenoun

    see Polarity, and Polar, n

    Etymology: [L. polus, Gr. a pivot or hinge on which anything turns, an axis, a pole; akin to to move: cf. F. ple.]

Freebase

  1. Pole

    Pole is the artistic name of Stefan Betke, a German electronic music artist commonly associated with the glitch genre as well as dubtronica.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Pole

    pōl, n. that on which anything turns, as a pivot or axis: one of the ends of the axis of a sphere, esp. of the earth: (physics) one of the two points of a body in which the attractive or repulsive energy is concentrated, as in a magnet: (geom.) a point from which a pencil of rays radiates (see Polar).—n. Pole′-star, a star at or near the pole of the heavens: a guide or director.—Poles of the heavens, the two points in the heavens opposite to the poles of the earth—called also Celestial poles. [Fr.,—L. polus—Gr. polospelein, to be in motion.]

  2. Pole

    pōl, n. a pale or pile: a long piece of wood: an instrument for measuring: a measure of length, 5½ yards: in square measure, 30¼ yards.—v.t. to push or stir with a pole.—v.i. to use a pole.—adj. Pole′-clipt (Shak.), hedged in with poles.—Under bare poles, with all sails furled. [A.S. pál (Ger. pfahl)—L. palus, a stake.]

  3. Pole

    pōl, n. a native of Poland.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Pole

    the name given to the extremities of the imaginary axis of the earth, round which it is conceived to revolve.

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. pole

    The upper end of the highest masts, when they rise above the rigging.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. pole

    See Ordnance, Carriages for, Nomenclature of Artillery Carriage.

Suggested Resources

  1. pole

    Song lyrics by pole -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by pole on the Lyrics.com website.

  2. POLE

    What does POLE stand for? -- Explore the various meanings for the POLE acronym on the Abbreviations.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'pole' in Nouns Frequency: #1522

How to pronounce pole?

How to say pole in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of pole in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of pole in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of pole in a Sentence

  1. James Overland:

    If you think of those two storm centers as kind of a dumbbell with the winds blowing around them, it brought all that warm air up from the Atlantic to near the North Pole.

  2. Buzz Aldrin:

    Aldrin in the Apollo 11 Lunar Module. For the 50th anniversary of the landing, Omega issued a limited edition Speedmaster watch, a tribute to the one that Buzz Aldrin wore to the moon. ( Neil Armstrong/NASA via AP) I prefaced desolate with magnificent, because of humanitys reaching outward and accomplishing something that people thought was impossible, Buzz Aldrin said. They dreamed of somehow reaching the moon. And to demonstrate, to be a part of demonstrating this miracle was magnificent. On July 16, 1969, Buzz Aldrin, along with mission commander Neil Armstrong and command module pilot Michael Collins, launched from Kennedy Space Center atop a Saturn V rocket. Four days later, Neil Armstrong made history when Neil Armstrong became the first person to walk on the Moon. Aldrinexited thelunar module 19 minutes after Neil Armstrong. The famed astronaut joked about being second during his interview. APOLLO 11 INSIDERS REMEMBER HISTORYS MOST FAMOUS SPACE MISSION : WE HAD A JOB TO DO AND WE DID IT I will forever, no matter what I do, be known as the second man on the moon, he quipped. In this July 20, 1969 photo made available by NASA, astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the moon during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity. ( Neil Armstrong/NASA via AP) Why does it bother you to be a second man to walk on the moon ? Youre one of a dozen men who had that incredible role, Cavuto asked in a follow-up question. Well, people love being vice president, dont they ? No, Buzz Aldrin responded with a chuckle. APOLLO 11S EPIC MISSION TO THE MOON IN PICTURES Does it bother me ? Yeah, it does a little bit, Buzz Aldrin continued. Why ? Because that isnt the way I would have described what this country did with two human beings landing on the moon and then deciding who was going to go out. We did things together as a team. The famous astronaut also recalls his famous steps across the surface of the moon and how he was well aware that the world was watching. Right near the end of our period out there Buzz Aldrin was doing something with the rock boxes -- I knew where the TV camera was, and I jumped up and down and pranced around to demonstrate the mobility that a person has, he said. So I was demonstrating for the people watching on TVintentionally showing them the varieties of kangaroo hop of turning. APOLLO 11 INSIDERS REMEMBER HISTORYS MOST FAMOUS SPACE MISSION : WE HAD A JOB TO DO AND WE DID IT During his sit-down with Cavuto, Buzz Aldrin also recollected the experience of looking back at Earth while on the surface of the Moon. [ You ] look up there, theres the earth. It looks small when its up there. If you look close, you may be able to see the ice over a pole, he said. If you look at your Omega watch, you may be able to tell what time it is in Houston. Buzz Aldrin also talked about the political significance of their mission to the moon, coming as it did duringthe space race with Russia atthe height of the Cold War. APOLLO 11 : THE BOOK THAT LANDED MAN ON THE MOON COULD SELL FOR $ 9 MILLION I do a lot of thinking today -- about somebody who had -- the guts to see that we were being outshone -- outshined in the Cold War by the Soviet Union, and to say, What can we do ?

  3. Ryan Maue:

    The combined flow at all levels of atmosphere was directed from the Atlantic over the Arctic and into Siberia, thus, warmer and moister marine air from Atlantic traveled over the Pole and raised temps to near or at freezing for a few hours. However, the warm advection event was short lived and temps are closer to normal well below 0.

  4. Gabriel Tobie:

    The infrared shows us that the surface of the south pole is young, which is not a surprise because we knew about the jets that blast icy material there, now, thanks to these infrared eyes, you can go back in time and say that one large region in the northern hemisphere appears also young and was probably active not that long ago, in geologic timelines.

  5. Sam Kendricks:

    The winds and the conditions were switching, so every pole vaulter had to make so many adjustments, that may be why we didn't have the highest performances but I tell you the little Mondo Duplantis kept us honest today.

Images & Illustrations of pole

  1. polepolepolepolepole

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for pole

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