What does pantomime mean?

Definitions for pantomime
ˈpæn təˌmaɪmpan·tomime

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word pantomime.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. mime, pantomime, dumb showverb

    a performance using gestures and body movements without words

  2. mime, pantomimeverb

    act out without words but with gestures and bodily movements only

    "The acting students mimed eating an apple"

GCIDE

  1. Pantomimenoun

    A dramatic representation by actors who use only dumb show; a depiction of an event, narrative, or situation using only gestures and bodily movements, without speaking; hence, dumb show, generally.

    Etymology: [F., fr. L. pantomimus, Gr. , lit., all-imitating; pa^s, panto`s, all + to imitate: cf. It. pantomimo. See Mimic.]

Wiktionary

  1. pantomimenoun

    A Classical comic actor, especially one who works mainly through gesture and mime.

    Etymology: Circa 17th century, from pantomimus, from παντόμιμος, from πᾶς + μιμέομαι.

  2. pantomimenoun

    The drama in ancient Greece and Rome featuring such performers; or (later) any of various kinds of performance modelled on such work.

    Etymology: Circa 17th century, from pantomimus, from παντόμιμος, from πᾶς + μιμέομαι.

  3. pantomimenoun

    A traditional theatrical entertainment, originally based on the commedia dell'arte, but later aimed mostly at children and involving physical comedy, topical jokes, and fairy-tale plots.

    Etymology: Circa 17th century, from pantomimus, from παντόμιμος, from πᾶς + μιμέομαι.

  4. pantomimenoun

    Gesturing without speaking; dumb-show, mime.

    Etymology: Circa 17th century, from pantomimus, from παντόμιμος, from πᾶς + μιμέομαι.

  5. pantomimeverb

    To gesture without speaking.

    Etymology: Circa 17th century, from pantomimus, from παντόμιμος, from πᾶς + μιμέομαι.

  6. pantomimeverb

    To entertain others by silent gestures or actions.

    Etymology: Circa 17th century, from pantomimus, from παντόμιμος, from πᾶς + μιμέομαι.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Pantomimenoun

    a universal mimic; an actor who assumes many parts; also, any actor

    Etymology: [F., fr. L. pantomimus, Gr. , lit., all-imitating; pa^s, panto`s, all + to imitate: cf. It. pantomimo. See Mimic.]

  2. Pantomimenoun

    one who acts his part by gesticulation or dumb show only, without speaking; a pantomimist

    Etymology: [F., fr. L. pantomimus, Gr. , lit., all-imitating; pa^s, panto`s, all + to imitate: cf. It. pantomimo. See Mimic.]

  3. Pantomimenoun

    a dramatic representation by actors who use only dumb show; hence, dumb show, generally

    Etymology: [F., fr. L. pantomimus, Gr. , lit., all-imitating; pa^s, panto`s, all + to imitate: cf. It. pantomimo. See Mimic.]

  4. Pantomimenoun

    a dramatic and spectacular entertainment of which dumb acting as well as burlesque dialogue, music, and dancing by Clown, Harlequin, etc., are features

    Etymology: [F., fr. L. pantomimus, Gr. , lit., all-imitating; pa^s, panto`s, all + to imitate: cf. It. pantomimo. See Mimic.]

  5. Pantomimeadjective

    representing only in mute actions; pantomimic; as, a pantomime dance

    Etymology: [F., fr. L. pantomimus, Gr. , lit., all-imitating; pa^s, panto`s, all + to imitate: cf. It. pantomimo. See Mimic.]

Freebase

  1. Pantomime

    Pantomime – not to be confused with the theatrical medium of mime – is a form of musical comedy stage production, designed for families, developed in the United Kingdom and mostly performed during the Christmas and New Year season. Modern pantomime includes songs, slapstick comedy and dancing, employs gender-crossing actors, and combines topical humour with a story loosely based on a well-known fairy tale. It is a participatory form of theatre, in which the audience is expected to sing along with certain parts of the music and shout out phrases to the performers. Pantomime has a long theatrical history in Western culture dating back to classical theatre, and it developed partly from the 16th-century commedia dell'arte tradition of Italy, as well as other European and British stage traditions, such as 17th-century masques.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Pantomime

    pan′tō-mīm, n. one who expresses his meaning by action without speaking: a play or an entertainment in dumb show: an entertainment in a theatre, usually about Christmas-time, in which some well-known story is acted, amidst showy scenery, with music and dancing, concluding with buffoonery by conventional characters—the clown, pantaloon, harlequin, and columbine.—adj. representing only by action without words.—adjs. Pantomim′ic, -al.—adv. Pantomim′ically.—n. Pan′tomimist, an actor in a pantomime. [Fr.,—L.—Gr. pantomimos, imitator of all—pas, pantos, all, mimos, an imitator.]

Etymology and Origins

  1. Pantomime

    In the modern sense a pantomime is an entertainment in which current events or fashionable foibles are introduced by way of burlesque. Formerly it denoted a performance of Italian comedy in which the action took place in dumb show, so called from the Greek pantomimos, an imitator of all or everything. The Roman mimes or mimi were not theatrical performers, but mutes at funerals, whose function it was to imitate the characteristic actions of the deceased--e.g. the virtue of generosity.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of pantomime in Chaldean Numerology is: 3

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of pantomime in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Images & Illustrations of pantomime

  1. pantomimepantomimepantomimepantomimepantomime

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Translations for pantomime

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