What does novel mean?

Definitions for novel
ˈnɒv əlnov·el

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word novel.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. novel(noun)

    an extended fictional work in prose; usually in the form of a story

  2. novel(adj)

    a printed and bound book that is an extended work of fiction

    "his bookcases were filled with nothing but novels"; "he burned all the novels"

  3. fresh, new, novel(adj)

    original and of a kind not seen before

    "the computer produced a completely novel proof of a well-known theorem"

  4. novel, refreshing(adj)

    pleasantly new or different

    "common sense of a most refreshing sort"

GCIDE

  1. Novel(n.)

    A fictitious tale or narrative, longer than a short story, having some degree of complexity and development of characters; it is usually organized as a time sequence of events, and is commonly intended to exhibit the operation of the passions, and often of love. Dryden.

    Etymology: [F. nouvelle. See Novel, a.]

Wikipedia

  1. Novel

    A novel is a relatively long work of narrative fiction, normally written in prose form, and which is typically published as a book. The present English word for a long work of prose fiction derives from the Italian novella for "new", "news", or "short story of something new", itself from the Latin novella, a singular noun use of the neuter plural of novellus, diminutive of novus, meaning "new".Some novelists, including Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Ann Radcliffe, John Cowper Powys, preferred the term "romance" to describe their novels. According to Margaret Doody, the novel constitutes "a continuous and comprehensive history of about two thousand years", with its origins in the Ancient Greek and Roman novel, in Chivalric romance, and in the tradition of the Italian renaissance novella. The ancient romance form was revived by Romanticism, especially the historical romances of Walter Scott and the Gothic novel. Some, including M. H. Abrams and Walter Scott, have argued that a novel is a fiction narrative that displays a realistic depiction of the state of a society, while the romance encompasses any fictitious narrative that emphasizes marvellous or uncommon incidents.Works of fiction that include marvellous or uncommon incidents are also novels, including The Lord of The Rings, To Kill a Mockingbird, and Frankenstein. "Romances" are works of fiction whose main emphasis is on marvellous or unusual incidents, and should not be confused with the romance novel, a type of genre fiction that focuses on romantic love. Murasaki Shikibu's Tale of Genji, an early 11th-century Japanese text, has sometimes been described as the world's first novel, but there is considerable debate over this — there were certainly long fictional works much earlier. Spread of printed books in China led to the appearance of classical Chinese novels by the Ming dynasty (1368–1644). An early example from Europe was written in Muslim Spain by the Sufi writer Ibn Tufayl entitled Hayy ibn Yaqdhan. Later developments occurred after the invention of the printing press. Miguel de Cervantes, author of Don Quixote (the first part of which was published in 1605), is frequently cited as the first significant European novelist of the modern era. Ian Watt, in The Rise of the Novel (1957), suggested that the modern novel was born in the early 18th century.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Novel(adj)

    of recent origin or introduction; not ancient; new; hence, out of the ordinary course; unusual; strange; surprising

    Etymology: [F. nouvelle. See Novel, a.]

  2. Novel(adj)

    that which is new or unusual; a novelty

    Etymology: [F. nouvelle. See Novel, a.]

  3. Novel(adj)

    news; fresh tidings

    Etymology: [F. nouvelle. See Novel, a.]

  4. Novel(adj)

    a fictitious tale or narrative, professing to be conformed to real life; esp., one intended to exhibit the operation of the passions, and particularly of love

    Etymology: [F. nouvelle. See Novel, a.]

  5. Novel(adj)

    a new or supplemental constitution. See the Note under Novel, a

    Etymology: [F. nouvelle. See Novel, a.]

Freebase

  1. Novel

    A novel is a long prose narrative that describes fictional characters and events in the form of a sequential story, usually. The genre has historical roots in the fields of medieval and early modern romance and in the tradition of the novella. The latter, an Italian word used to describe short stories, supplied the present generic English term in the 18th century. Further definition of the genre is historically difficult. The construction of the narrative, the plot, the relation to reality, the characterization, and the use of language are usually discussed to show a novel's artistic merits. Most of these requirements were introduced to literary prose in the 16th and 17th centuries, in order to give fiction a justification outside the field of factual history.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Novel

    nov′el, adj. new: unusual: strange.—n. that which is new: a new or supplemental constitution or decree, issued by certain Roman emperors, as Justinian, after their authentic publications of law (also Novell′a): a fictitious prose narrative or tale presenting a picture of real life, esp. of the emotional crises in the life-history of the men and women portrayed.—n. Novelette′, a small novel.—v.t. Nov′elise, to change by introducing novelties: to put into the form of novels.—v.i. to make innovations.—n. Nov′elist, a novel-writer: an innovator.—adj. Novelist′ic.—n. Nov′elty, newness: unusual appearance: anything new, strange, or different from anything before:—pl. Nov′elties. [O. Fr. novel (Fr. nouveau)—L. novellusnovus.]

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. NOVEL

    A fabric that is often (k)nit in print, though the yarn be well spun.

CrunchBase

  1. Novel

    Novel, Inc. is a venture capital funded start-up in Seattle, Washington that has been seen in The New York Times, Business Week, and is the recipient of multiple accolades and global awards. Novel, Inc. was incorporated in May 2010 and was originally founded as Novel Interactive in 2009.While in the video game industry, Novel is not just positioning to build traditional video games. Novel received the Pacific Northwest Innovation Award from Microsoft in Entrepreneurs™ Organization™s annual GSEA competition, but has not yet publicly released any information. Novel was also selected by Entrepreneur™s Organization, from over 1,500 businesses across 33 countries, as one of the top 30 young entrepreneurs and ventures in the world.Novel, Inc. has announced an upcoming massively multiplayer online title, Empire & State, to be released this year. However, their CEO has stated, continuously building games is critical to our strategy, but our second product to be released in early 2011 will actually be the product that won the Innovation Award and could change the way you think about what games are.

Suggested Resources

  1. novel

    Song lyrics by novel -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by novel on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'novel' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #3206

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'novel' in Written Corpus Frequency: #4738

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'novel' in Nouns Frequency: #1050

  4. Adjectives Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'novel' in Adjectives Frequency: #977

How to pronounce novel?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say novel in sign language?

  1. novel

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of novel in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of novel in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of novel in a Sentence

  1. Orrin Konheim:

    DuVernay, who is African-American, told Entertainment Weekly. I was interested in … a heroine that looked like the girls I grew up with. DuVernay said she identified with some progressive ideas she found in L'Engle's novel. She's a very radical thinker and she embedded her sense of what society should and could be in this piece, and a lot of it I agree with. But does that mean her adaptation will adopt a political tone ? Experts say we shouldn't jump to any conclusions about whatDuVernay’s final film will look like. Freelance journalist Orrin Konheim, who has written for The American Conservative, noted that many films, including The Manchurian Candidate, have been remade with African-American stars. Ava DuVernay’s casting choice seems like a non-issue.

  2. Paul Northcott:

    Paul Northcott said. Grants for early investigators like Paul Northcott may also help them obtain bigger funding opportunities through the National Institutes of Health( National Institutes of Health). We're able to recruit, we're able to conduct studies that we wouldn't have been able to otherwise. This then helps us build the necessary foundation to go after National Institutes of Health funding and getting that first RO1 through the NCI( National Cancer Institute), Paul Northcott said. One of the toughest hurdles for young investigators is securing their first R01, the gold standard of grants that give scientists enough money and time to complete a project and publish results within four or five years. The budget for R01’s is unlimited. According to the director of the National Cancer Institute, Dr. Norman Sharpless, the NCI is directing their extramural funders to set aside additional funding to increase the total number of first R01's given to early-stage investigators by at least 25 percent in 2018. By training more diverse groups of scientists, organizations like the National Cancer Institute hope to spur new commitments to basic science that can drive novel approaches and technologies to cancer treatment. Paul Northcott says supporting the next generation of cancer scientists is crucial to ensuring a talented and creative research workforce for the decades ahead. Oftentimes it’s difficult to see how studying a single gene or a pathway or a biochemical mechanism might have a broader impact, but I would encourage anyone involved and anyone starting out in this type of field to think about what is the goal of Cancer Research -LRB- AACR -RRB- ? How can this research change health care, or, in this case, cancer research ?

  3. Eric Toner:

    We don’t have the ability to produce vaccines to a novel pathogen within months rather than decades and we don’t have the global public health capabilities that would allow us to rapidly identify and control an outbreak before it becomes a pandemic.

  4. Heidi Rehm:

    For Matchmaker Exchange our measure of success will be finding novel genes and matching patients with candidate genes to build evidence to implicate those genes in disease.

  5. J. K. Rowling:

    I had an American journalist say to me, "Is it true you wrote the whole of the first novel on napkins?" I was tempted to say, "On teabags, I used to save them.

Images & Illustrations of novel

  1. novelnovelnovelnovelnovel

Popularity rank by frequency of use

novel#1#3456#10000

Translations for novel

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