What does nitrogen mean?

Definitions for nitrogen
ˈnaɪ trə dʒənni·tro·gen

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word nitrogen.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. nitrogen, N, atomic number 7noun

    a common nonmetallic element that is normally a colorless odorless tasteless inert diatomic gas; constitutes 78 percent of the atmosphere by volume; a constituent of all living tissues

GCIDE

  1. Nitrogennoun

    A colorless nonmetallic element of atomic number 7, tasteless and odorless, comprising four fifths of the atmosphere by volume in the form of molecular nitrogen (N2). It is chemically very inert in the free state, and as such is incapable of supporting life (hence the name azote still used by French chemists); but it forms many important compounds, such as ammonia, nitric acid, the cyanides, etc, and is a constituent of all organized living tissues, animal or vegetable. Symbol N. Atomic weight 14.007. It was formerly regarded as a permanent noncondensible gas, but was liquefied in 1877 by Cailletet of Paris, and Pictet of Geneva, and boils at -195.8

Wiktionary

  1. nitrogennoun

    A chemical element (symbol N) with an atomic number of 7 and atomic weight of 14.0067.

  2. nitrogennoun

    Molecular nitrogen (N), a colorless, odorless gas at room temperature.

  3. nitrogennoun

    A specific nitrogen within a chemical formula, or a specific isotope of nitrogen

    The two nitrogens are located next to one another on the ring.

  4. Etymology: From nitrogène (coined by Lavoisier), corresponding to nitro- + -gen.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Nitrogennoun

    a colorless nonmetallic element, tasteless and odorless, comprising four fifths of the atmosphere by volume. It is chemically very inert in the free state, and as such is incapable of supporting life (hence the name azote still used by French chemists); but it forms many important compounds, as ammonia, nitric acid, the cyanides, etc, and is a constituent of all organized living tissues, animal or vegetable. Symbol N. Atomic weight 14. It was formerly regarded as a permanent noncondensible gas, but was liquefied in 1877 by Cailletet of Paris, and Pictet of Geneva

  2. Etymology: [L. nitrum natron + -gen: cf. F. nitrogne. See Niter.]

Freebase

  1. Nitrogen

    Nitrogen is a chemical element with symbol N and atomic number 7. Elemental nitrogen is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, and mostly inert diatomic gas at standard conditions, constituting 78.09% by volume of Earth's atmosphere. The element nitrogen was discovered as a separable component of air, by Scottish physician Daniel Rutherford, in 1772. It belongs to the pnictogen family. Nitrogen is a common element in the universe, estimated at about seventh in total abundance in our galaxy and the Solar System. It is synthesised by fusion of carbon and hydrogen in supernovas. Due to the volatility of elemental nitrogen and its common compounds with hydrogen and oxygen, nitrogen is far less common on the rocky planets of the inner Solar System, and it is a relatively rare element on Earth as a whole. However, as on Earth, nitrogen and its compounds occur commonly as gases in the atmospheres of planets and moons that have atmospheres. Many industrially important compounds, such as ammonia, nitric acid, organic nitrates, and cyanides, contain nitrogen. The extremely strong bond in elemental nitrogen dominates nitrogen chemistry, causing difficulty for both organisms and industry in converting the N 2 into useful compounds, but at the same time causing release of large amounts of often useful energy when the compounds burn, explode, or decay back into nitrogen gas. Synthetically-produced ammonia and nitrates are key industrial fertilizers and fertilizer nitrates are key pollutants in causing the eutrophication of water systems.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Nitrogen

    nī′tro-jen, n. a gas forming nearly four-fifths of common air, a necessary constituent of every organised body, so called from its being an essential constituent of nitre.—adjs. Nitrogen′ic, Nitrog′enous.—v.t. Nitrog′enise, to impregnate with nitrogen.—n. Nitrom′eter, an apparatus for estimating nitrogen in some of its combinations. [Gr. nitron, and gennaein, to generate.]

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Nitrogen

    a gaseous element which constitutes one-fourth in volume of the atmosphere, is the basis of nitric acid, and is an essential constituent of proteids, alkaloids, and albuminoids.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Nitrogen

    An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight 14. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.

Anagrams for nitrogen »

  1. integron, ring tone, ringtone

How to pronounce nitrogen?

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of nitrogen in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of nitrogen in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of nitrogen in a Sentence

  1. Wesley Lefroy:

    If rains arrive in September, farmers will increase the use of nitrogen, if it remains dry, demand will fall further.

  2. Jessica Wu:

    In the office, I remove brown spots with laser, chemical peels, or freezing [them] with a liquid nitrogen spray.

  3. Chris Allen:

    It becomes very hard to continue economically farming animals or growing vegetables under a regime like this, the long term targets for nitrogen reduction, are effectively unachievable in some parts of the country, and will end pastoral farming in these areas.

  4. Environmental Engineering Professor Treavor Boyer:

    What you'll see is that you can collect enough nitrogen over those seven home football games to meet the nutrient requirements for that field for the growing season.

  5. Michael Wessel:

    This is a $43 billion firm, I do not believe we are talking about basic nitrogen-based fertilizers but some very high value products, this should be subject to strict scrutiny.

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Translations for nitrogen

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    To cause to become
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