What does newspeak mean?

Definitions for newspeak
ˈnuˌspik, ˈnyu-newspeak

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word newspeak.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. newspeak(noun)

    deliberately ambiguous and contradictory language use to mislead and manipulate the public

    "the welfare state brought its own newspeak"

Wiktionary

  1. Newspeak(ProperNoun)

    The fictional language devised to meet the needs of Ingsoc in the novel Nineteen Eighty-four (George Orwell, 1949). Designed to restrict the words, and hence the thoughts, of the citizens of Oceania.

    Etymology: From Newspeak

  2. Newspeak(ProperNoun)

    A highly dynamic and reflective programming language descended from Smalltalk, supporting both object-oriented and functional programming.

    Etymology: From Newspeak

  3. newspeak(Noun)

    A mode of talk by politicians and officials using ambiguous words to deceive the listener.

    Etymology: From Newspeak

Freebase

  1. Newspeak

    Newspeak is the fictional language in the novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, written by George Orwell. It is a reduced language created by the totalitarian state as a tool to limit free thought, and concepts that pose a threat to the regime such as freedom, self-expression, individuality, peace, etc. Any form of thought alternative to the party’s construct is classified as "thoughtcrime." Newspeak is explained in chapters 4 and 5 of Nineteen Eighty-Four, and in an appendix to the book. The language follows, for the most part, the same grammatical rules as English, but has a much more limiting, and constantly shifting vocabulary. Any synonyms or antonyms, along with undesirable concepts are eradicated. The goal is for everyone to be speaking this language by the year 2050. In the mean time, Oldspeak is still spoken among the working class citizens of Oceania, or the Proles. Orwell was inspired to invent Newspeak by the constructed language Basic English, which he promoted from 1942 to 1944 before emphatically rejecting it in his essay "Politics and the English Language". In this paper he deplores the bad English of his day, citing dying metaphors, pretentious diction or rhetoric, and meaningless words, which he claimed to encourage unclear thought and reasoning. Towards the end of the essay, Orwell states: “I said earlier that the decadence of our language is probably curable. Those who deny this would argue, if they produced an argument at all, that language merely reflects existing social conditions, and that we cannot influence its development by any direct tinkering with words or constructions."

How to pronounce newspeak?

  1. Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Indian

How to say newspeak in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of newspeak in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of newspeak in Pythagorean Numerology is: 4

Examples of newspeak in a Sentence

  1. George Orwell, 1984:

    It was terribly dangerous to let your thoughts wander when you were in any public place or within range of a telescreen. The smallest thing could give you away. A nervous tic, an unconscious look of anxiety, a habit of muttering to yourself—anything that carried with it the suggestion of abnormality, of having something to hide. In any case, to wear an improper expression on your face ... was itself a punishable offense. There was even a word for it in Newspeak: facecrime ...

  2. George Orwell:

    Don’t you see that the whole aim of Newspeak is to narrow the range of thought? In the end we shall make thoughtcrime literally impossible, because there will be no words in which to express it.

Images & Illustrations of newspeak

  1. newspeaknewspeaknewspeaknewspeaknewspeak

Popularity rank by frequency of use

newspeak#100000#107080#333333

Translations for newspeak

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