What does life mean?

Definitions for life
laɪflife

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word life.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. life(noun)

    a characteristic state or mode of living

    "social life"; "city life"; "real life"

  2. life, living(noun)

    the experience of being alive; the course of human events and activities

    "he could no longer cope with the complexities of life"

  3. life(noun)

    the course of existence of an individual; the actions and events that occur in living

    "he hoped for a new life in Australia"; "he wanted to live his own life without interference from others"

  4. animation, life, living, aliveness(noun)

    the condition of living or the state of being alive

    "while there's life there's hope"; "life depends on many chemical and physical processes"

  5. life, lifetime, life-time, lifespan(noun)

    the period during which something is functional (as between birth and death)

    "the battery had a short life"; "he lived a long and happy life"

  6. life(noun)

    the period between birth and the present time

    "I have known him all his life"

  7. life(noun)

    the period from the present until death

    "he appointed himself emperor for life"

  8. life(noun)

    a living person

    "his heroism saved a life"

  9. liveliness, life, spirit, sprightliness(noun)

    animation and energy in action or expression

    "it was a heavy play and the actors tried in vain to give life to it"

  10. life(noun)

    living things collectively

    "the oceans are teeming with life"

  11. life(noun)

    the organic phenomenon that distinguishes living organisms from nonliving ones

    "there is no life on the moon"

  12. biography, life, life story, life history(noun)

    an account of the series of events making up a person's life

  13. life(noun)

    a motive for living

    "pottery was his life"

  14. life sentence, life(noun)

    a prison term lasting as long as the prisoner lives

    "he got life for killing the guard"

Wiktionary

  1. life(Noun)

    The state that follows birth, and precedes death; the state of being alive and living.

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

  2. life(Noun)

    The period during which one (a person, an animal, a plant, a star) is alive.

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

  3. life(Noun)

    The span of time during which an object operates.

    This light bulb is designed to have a life of 2,000 hours.

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

  4. life(Noun)

    The period of time during which an object is recognizable.

    The life of this milk carton may be thousands of years in this landfill.

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

  5. life(Noun)

    A status given to any entity including animals, plants, fungi, bacteria, etc. u2014 and sometimes viruses u2014 having the properties of replication and metabolism.

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

  6. life(Noun)

    The essence of the manifestation and the foundation of the being.

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

  7. life(Noun)

    the subjective and inner manifestation of the individual.

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

  8. life(Noun)

    The world in general; existence.

    Man's life on this planet has been marked by continual conflict.

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

  9. life(Noun)

    A worthwhile existence.

    He gets up early in the morning, works all day long u2014 even on weekends u2014 and hardly sees his family. That's no life!

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

  10. life(Noun)

    The most worthwhile component or participant

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

  11. life(Noun)

    A biography.

    His life of the founder is finished, except for the title.

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

  12. life(Noun)

    Something which is inherently part of a person's existence, such as job, family, a loved one, etc.

    She's my love, my life.

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

  13. life(Noun)

    A life sentence; a term of imprisonment of a convict until his or her death.

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

  14. life(Noun)

    One of the player's chances to play, lost when a mistake is made.

    Scoring 1000 points is rewarded with an extra life.

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

  15. Life(ProperNoun)

    God.

    Etymology: From lif, lyf, from lif, from līban, from lībanan, from leyp-. Cognate with life, leif, liff, liif, Dutch lijf, lif, German Leib, Swedish liv, líf. Related to belive.

Wikipedia

  1. Life

    Life is a characteristic that distinguishes physical entities that have biological processes, such as signaling and self-sustaining processes, from those that do not, either because such functions have ceased (they have died), or because they never had such functions and are classified as inanimate. Various forms of life exist, such as plants, animals, fungi, protists, archaea, and bacteria. Biology is the science concerned with the study of life. There is currently no consensus regarding the definition of life. One popular definition is that organisms are open systems that maintain homeostasis, are composed of cells, have a life cycle, undergo metabolism, can grow, adapt to their environment, respond to stimuli, reproduce and evolve. Other definitions sometimes include non-cellular life such viruses and viroids. Abiogenesis is the natural process of life arising from non-living matter, such as simple organic compounds. The prevailing scientific hypothesis is that the transition from non-living to living entities was not a single event, but a gradual process of increasing complexity. Life on Earth first appeared as early as 4.28 billion years ago, soon after ocean formation 4.41 billion years ago, and not long after the formation of the Earth 4.54 billion years ago. The earliest known life forms are microfossils of bacteria. Researchers generally think that current life on Earth descends from an RNA world, although RNA-based life may not have been the first life to have existed. The classic 1952 Miller–Urey experiment and similar research demonstrated that most amino acids, the chemical constituents of the proteins used in all living organisms, can be synthesized from inorganic compounds under conditions intended to replicate those of the early Earth. Complex organic molecules occur in the Solar System and in interstellar space, and these molecules may have provided starting material for the development of life on Earth.Since its primordial beginnings, life on Earth has changed its environment on a geologic time scale, but it has also adapted to survive in most ecosystems and conditions. Some microorganisms, called extremophiles, thrive in physically or geochemically extreme environments that are detrimental to most other life on Earth. The cell is considered the structural and functional unit of life. There are two kinds of cells, prokaryotic and eukaryotic, both of which consist of cytoplasm enclosed within a membrane and contain many biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. Cells reproduce through a process of cell division, in which the parent cell divides into two or more daughter cells. In the past, there have been many attempts to define what is meant by "life" through obsolete concepts such as odic force, hylomorphism, spontaneous generation and vitalism, that have now been disproved by biological discoveries. Aristotle was the first person to classify organisms. Later, Carl Linnaeus introduced his system of binomial nomenclature for the classification of species. Eventually new groups and categories of life were discovered, such as cells and microorganisms, forcing dramatic revisions of the structure of relationships between living organisms. Though currently only known on Earth, life need not be restricted to it, and many scientists speculate in the existence of extraterrestrial life. Artificial life is a computer simulation or human-made reconstruction of any aspect of life, which is often used to examine systems related to natural life. Death is the permanent termination of all biological functions which sustain an organism, and as such, is the end of its life. Extinction is the term describing the dying out of a group or taxon, usually a species. Fossils are the preserved remains or traces of organisms.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Life(noun)

    the state of being which begins with generation, birth, or germination, and ends with death; also, the time during which this state continues; that state of an animal or plant in which all or any of its organs are capable of performing all or any of their functions; -- used of all animal and vegetable organisms

    Etymology: [AS. lf; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. lp life, body, OHG. lb life, Icel. lf, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. 119. See Live, and cf. Alive.]

  2. Life(noun)

    of human beings: The union of the soul and body; also, the duration of their union; sometimes, the deathless quality or existence of the soul; as, man is a creature having an immortal life

    Etymology: [AS. lf; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. lp life, body, OHG. lb life, Icel. lf, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. 119. See Live, and cf. Alive.]

  3. Life(noun)

    the potential principle, or force, by which the organs of animals and plants are started and continued in the performance of their several and cooperative functions; the vital force, whether regarded as physical or spiritual

    Etymology: [AS. lf; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. lp life, body, OHG. lb life, Icel. lf, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. 119. See Live, and cf. Alive.]

  4. Life(noun)

    figuratively: The potential or animating principle, also, the period of duration, of anything that is conceived of as resembling a natural organism in structure or functions; as, the life of a state, a machine, or a book; authority is the life of government

    Etymology: [AS. lf; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. lp life, body, OHG. lb life, Icel. lf, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. 119. See Live, and cf. Alive.]

  5. Life(noun)

    a certain way or manner of living with respect to conditions, circumstances, character, conduct, occupation, etc.; hence, human affairs; also, lives, considered collectively, as a distinct class or type; as, low life; a good or evil life; the life of Indians, or of miners

    Etymology: [AS. lf; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. lp life, body, OHG. lb life, Icel. lf, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. 119. See Live, and cf. Alive.]

  6. Life(noun)

    animation; spirit; vivacity; vigor; energy

    Etymology: [AS. lf; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. lp life, body, OHG. lb life, Icel. lf, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. 119. See Live, and cf. Alive.]

  7. Life(noun)

    that which imparts or excites spirit or vigor; that upon which enjoyment or success depends; as, he was the life of the company, or of the enterprise

    Etymology: [AS. lf; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. lp life, body, OHG. lb life, Icel. lf, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. 119. See Live, and cf. Alive.]

  8. Life(noun)

    the living or actual form, person, thing, or state; as, a picture or a description from the life

    Etymology: [AS. lf; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. lp life, body, OHG. lb life, Icel. lf, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. 119. See Live, and cf. Alive.]

  9. Life(noun)

    a person; a living being, usually a human being; as, many lives were sacrificed

    Etymology: [AS. lf; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. lp life, body, OHG. lb life, Icel. lf, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. 119. See Live, and cf. Alive.]

  10. Life(noun)

    the system of animal nature; animals in general, or considered collectively

    Etymology: [AS. lf; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. lp life, body, OHG. lb life, Icel. lf, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. 119. See Live, and cf. Alive.]

  11. Life(noun)

    an essential constituent of life, esp. the blood

    Etymology: [AS. lf; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. lp life, body, OHG. lb life, Icel. lf, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. 119. See Live, and cf. Alive.]

  12. Life(noun)

    a history of the acts and events of a life; a biography; as, Johnson wrote the life of Milton

    Etymology: [AS. lf; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. lp life, body, OHG. lb life, Icel. lf, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. 119. See Live, and cf. Alive.]

  13. Life(noun)

    enjoyment in the right use of the powers; especially, a spiritual existence; happiness in the favor of God; heavenly felicity

    Etymology: [AS. lf; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. lp life, body, OHG. lb life, Icel. lf, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. 119. See Live, and cf. Alive.]

  14. Life(noun)

    something dear to one as one's existence; a darling; -- used as a term of endearment

    Etymology: [AS. lf; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. lp life, body, OHG. lb life, Icel. lf, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. 119. See Live, and cf. Alive.]

Freebase

  1. Life

    Life is a characteristic that distinguishes objects that have signaling and self-sustaining processes from those that do not, either because such functions have ceased, or else because they lack such functions and are classified as inanimate. Biology is the science concerned with the study of life. Any contiguous living system is called an organism. Organisms undergo metabolism, maintain homeostasis, possess a capacity to grow, respond to stimuli, reproduce and, through natural selection, adapt to their environment in successive generations. More complex living organisms can communicate through various means. A diverse array of living organisms can be found in the biosphere of Earth, and the properties common to these organisms—plants, animals, fungi, protists, archaea, and bacteria—are a carbon- and water-based cellular form with complex organization and heritable genetic information. Scientific evidence suggests that life began on Earth approximately 3.5 billion years ago. The mechanism by which life emerged on Earth is unknown although many hypotheses have been formulated. Since then, life has evolved into a wide variety of forms, which biologists have classified into a hierarchy of taxa. Life can survive and thrive in a wide range of conditions. The meaning of life—its significance, origin, purpose, and ultimate fate—is a central concept and question in philosophy and religion. Both philosophy and religion have offered interpretations as to how life relates to existence and consciousness, and on related issues such as life stance, purpose, conception of a god or gods, a soul or an afterlife. Different cultures throughout history have had widely varying approaches to these issues.

The Roycroft Dictionary

  1. life

    1. An ante-mortem statement; the intrigue of force and matter; the insomnia of death; a log-jam on the stream of life. 2. The pursuit of the superfluous. 3. The cupola of a tomb. 4. A game something like Blind Man's Buff. 5. The paradise of liars. 6. A compromise between Fate and Freewill. 7. A warfare between the sexes. 8. What you choose to make it. 9. A bank-account with so much divine energy at your disposal. 10. Just one improper number after another. 11. The interval between the time your teeth are almost through and you are almost through with your teeth. 12. An affirmative between two negatives.

The New Hacker's Dictionary

  1. life

    1. A cellular-automata game invented by John Horton Conway and first introduced publicly by Martin Gardner (Scientific American, October 1970); the game's popularity had to wait a few years for computers on which it could reasonably be played, as it's no fun to simulate the cells by hand. Many hackers pass through a stage of fascination with it, and hackers at various places contributed heavily to the mathematical analysis of this game (most notably Bill Gosper at MIT, who even implemented life in TECO!). When a hacker mentions ‘life’, he is much more likely to mean this game than the magazine, the breakfast cereal, or the human state of existence. Many web resources are available starting from the Open Directory page of Life. The Life Lexicon is a good indicator of what makes the game so fascinating.A glider, possibly the best known of the quasi-organic phenomena in the Game of Life. 2. The opposite of Usenet. As in “Get a life!”

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Life

    The state that distinguishes organisms from inorganic matter, manifested by growth, metabolism, reproduction, and adaptation. It includes the course of existence, the sum of experiences, the mode of existing, or the fact of being. Over the centuries inquiries into the nature of life have crossed the boundaries from philosophy to biology, forensic medicine, anthropology, etc., in creative as well as scientific literature. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)

Editors Contribution

  1. Life

    Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and supper like a pauper.

    Submitted by anonymous on April 26, 2020  
  2. life

    Time from birth to the present moment.

    This life is so precious which is why we are always loving, caring and kind to each other.

    Submitted by MaryC on February 16, 2020  
  3. life

    To exist as a being with a mind, soul, conscience, consciousness and spirit.

    Our life on earth is a precious gift of which we all have an ethical and moral duty to create optimum health, human rights and shared prosperity for every human being and animal on planet earth.

    Submitted by MaryC on April 22, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. life

    Song lyrics by life -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by life on the Lyrics.com website.

  2. LIFE

    What does LIFE stand for? -- Explore the various meanings for the LIFE acronym on the Abbreviations.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'life' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #136

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'life' in Written Corpus Frequency: #330

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'life' in Nouns Frequency: #12

How to pronounce life?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say life in sign language?

  1. life

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of life in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of life in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of life in a Sentence

  1. Colombian Jarlinson Pantano:

    I dreamt of this all my life, I'm so happy, majka had won several Tour stages (three) and I was wary of him in the finale but I had good sensations. I knew that if I was catching him in the descent I'd have a good chance to win.

  2. Rachel Dolezal:

    After that comes out, then I'll feel a little bit more free to reveal my life in the racial social-justice movement, i'm looking for the quickest way back to that, but I don't feel like I am probably going to be able to re-enter that work with the type of leadership required to make change if I don't have something like a published explanation.

  3. Felix Adler:

    The unique personality which is the real life in me, I can not gain unless I search for the real life, the spiritual quality, in others. I am myself spiritually dead unless I reach out to the fine quality dormant in others. For it is only with the god enthroned in the innermost shrine of the other, that the god hidden in me, will consent to appear.

  4. Bryant McGill:

    Surrender is the path to freedom through our unique authenticity, where we experience the flow of life not through the narrow lens of the mind, but through the vast refuge of the heart.

  5. Elizabeth Jewell:

    It adds additional justification for this surgical recommendation, i think that needs to be balanced with a woman’s quality of life from surgical menopause and their childbearing desires.

Images & Illustrations of life

  1. lifelifelifelifelife

Popularity rank by frequency of use

life#1#200#10000

Translations for life

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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