What does lavender mean?

Definitions for lavender
ˈlæv ən dərlaven·der

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word lavender.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. lavendernoun

    any of various Old World aromatic shrubs or subshrubs with usually mauve or blue flowers; widely cultivated

  2. lavenderadjective

    a pale purple color

  3. lavender, lilac, lilac-coloredadjective

    of a pale purple color

Wiktionary

  1. lavendernoun

    Any of a group of European plants, genus, Lavandula, of the mint family.

  2. lavendernoun

    a pale purple colour, like that of the lavender flower.

  3. lavenderadjective

    Having a pale purple colour.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Lavendernoun

    an aromatic plant of the genus Lavandula (L. vera), common in the south of Europe. It yields and oil used in medicine and perfumery. The Spike lavender (L. Spica) yields a coarser oil (oil of spike), used in the arts

    Etymology: [OE. lavendre, F. lavande, It. lavanda lavender, a washing, fr. L. lavare to wash; cf. It. lsavendola, LL. lavendula. So called because it was used in bathing and washing. See Lave. to wash, and cf. Lavender.]

  2. Lavendernoun

    the pale, purplish color of lavender flowers, paler and more delicate than lilac

    Etymology: [OE. lavendre, F. lavande, It. lavanda lavender, a washing, fr. L. lavare to wash; cf. It. lsavendola, LL. lavendula. So called because it was used in bathing and washing. See Lave. to wash, and cf. Lavender.]

Freebase

  1. Lavender

    Lavandula is a genus of 39 species of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae. It is native to the Old World and is found from Cape Verde and the Canary Islands, southern Europe across to northern and eastern Africa, the Mediterranean, southwest Asia to southeast India. Many members of the genus are cultivated extensively in temperate climates as ornamental plants for garden and landscape use, for use as culinary herbs, and also commercially for the extraction of essential oils. The most widely cultivated species, Lavandula angustifolia is often referred to as lavender, and there is a colour named for the shade of the flowers of this species.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Lavender

    lav′en-dėr, n. an odoriferous plant, probably so called from its being laid with newly washed clothes: a pale-lilac colour, the colour of lavender blossoms.—v.t. to sprinkle with lavender.—n. Lav′ender-wa′ter, a perfume composed of spirits of wine, essential oil of lavender, and ambergris.—Lay in lavender, to lay by carefully, as clothes, with sprigs of lavender in them; Oil of lavender, an aromatic oil distilled from lavender flowers and stems, used as a stimulant and tonic. [M. E. lavendre—Fr. lavande—L. lavāre, to wash.]

Editors Contribution

  1. lavender

    A type of cultivar, plant and seed created in various species.

    Lavender plants are grown in many countries across the world and are used for herbs and oils and other purposes.

    Submitted by MaryC on July 26, 2015  

Etymology and Origins

  1. Lavender

    From the Latin verb lavare, to wash, because this shrub yields an essential oil employed in medicine and perfumery. Laundresses also use it for preserving newly washed linen against moths.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of lavender in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of lavender in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Examples of lavender in a Sentence

  1. Dale Gibson:

    For city dwellers, herbs are a great thing to have growing on your window sill, rosemary, lavender, thyme, and chives are great options that require little space and provide produce for humans and bees.

  2. Ashleigh Wilson:

    There are not too many sure bets in the world of art, but a Whiteley painting from the mid-70s featuring Lavender Bay comes pretty close, that was a period when he really reached the summit of his creativity.

  3. Chief Operating Officer Jim Farley:

    We've found lots of hacks, people are putting lavender oil in the masks.

  4. Lorna Roberts:

    When there was the Great Plague in London, doctors would have lavender stashed into the front of their face masks to help keep the stench of the plague away, it has been heralded for centuries for its antiseptic antibacterial uses.

Images & Illustrations of lavender

  1. lavenderlavenderlavenderlavenderlavender

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lavender#10000#10745#100000

Translations for lavender

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