What does expansion mean?

Definitions for expansion
ɪkˈspæn ʃənex·pan·sion

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word expansion.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. expansion, enlargementnoun

    the act of increasing (something) in size or volume or quantity or scope

  2. expansionnoun

    a function expressed as a sum or product of terms

    "the expansion of (a+b)^2 is a^2 + 2ab + b^2"

  3. expansion, enlargement, elaborationnoun

    a discussion that provides additional information

  4. expansion, expanding uponnoun

    adding information or detail

GCIDE

  1. Expansionnoun

    an enlarged or extended version of something, such as a writing or discourse; as, the journal article is an expansion of the lecture she gave.

    Etymology: [L. expansio: cf. F. expansion.]

  2. Expansionnoun

    (Economics & Commmerce) an increase in the production of goods and services over time, and in the volume of business transactions, generally associated with an increase in employment and an increase in the money supply. Opposite of contraction.

    Etymology: [L. expansio: cf. F. expansion.]

Wiktionary

  1. expansionnoun

    The act or process of expanding.

    The expansion of metals and plastics in response to heat is well understood.

  2. expansionnoun

    The fractional change in unit length per unit length per unit temperature change.

  3. expansionnoun

    A new addition.

    My new office is in the expansion behind the main building.

  4. expansionnoun

    A product to be used with a previous product.

    "This expansion requires the original game-board."

Webster Dictionary

  1. Expansionnoun

    the act of expanding or spreading out; the condition of being expanded; dilation; enlargement

    Etymology: [L. expansio: cf. F. expansion.]

  2. Expansionnoun

    that which is expanded; expanse; extend surface; as, the expansion of a sheet or of a lake; the expansion was formed of metal

    Etymology: [L. expansio: cf. F. expansion.]

  3. Expansionnoun

    space through which anything is expanded; also, pure space

    Etymology: [L. expansio: cf. F. expansion.]

  4. Expansionnoun

    enlargement or extension of business transactions; esp., increase of the circulation of bank notes

    Etymology: [L. expansio: cf. F. expansion.]

  5. Expansionnoun

    the developed result of an indicated operation; as, the expansion of (a + b)2 is a2 + 2ab + b2

    Etymology: [L. expansio: cf. F. expansion.]

  6. Expansionnoun

    the operation of steam in a cylinder after its communication with the boiler has been cut off, by which it continues to exert pressure upon the moving piston

    Etymology: [L. expansio: cf. F. expansion.]

  7. Expansionnoun

    the enlargement of the ship mathematically from a model or drawing to the full or building size, in the process of construction

    Etymology: [L. expansio: cf. F. expansion.]

Freebase

  1. Expansion

    In geometry, expansion is a polytope operation where facets are separated and moved radially apart, and new facets are formed at separated elements. Equivalently this operation can be imagined by keeping facets in the same position but reducing their size. According to Coxeter, this multidimensional term was defined by Alicia Boole Stott for creating new polytopes, specifically starting from regular polytopes to construct new uniform polytopes. The expansion operation is symmetric with respect to a regular polytope and its dual. The resulting figure contains the facets of both the regular and its dual, along with various prismatic facets filling the gaps created between intermediate dimensional elements. It has somewhat different meanings by dimension. In a Wythoff construction, an expansion is generated by reflections from the first and last mirrors. By dimension: ⁕A regular {p} polygon expands into a regular 2n-gon. ⁕The operation is identical to truncation for polygons, t0,1{p} and has Coxeter-Dynkin diagram . ⁕A regular {p,q} polyhedron expands into a polyhedron with vertex figure p.4.q.4. ⁕This operation for polyhedra is also called cantellation, t0,2{p,q}, and has Coxeter-Dynkin diagram .For example, a rhombicuboctahedron can be called an expanded cube, expanded octahedron, as well as a cantellated cube or cantellated octahedron.

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. EXPANSION

    A combination of Grand Larceny and Piracy, involving the destruction of the Constitution and Declaration of Independence.--Boston. The benevolent assimilation of previously oppressed peoples--Washington, D.C. A doubtful commercial experiment.--Wall Street. The white man's burden.--Kipling.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'expansion' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2817

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'expansion' in Written Corpus Frequency: #4055

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'expansion' in Nouns Frequency: #1199

How to pronounce expansion?

How to say expansion in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of expansion in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of expansion in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Examples of expansion in a Sentence

  1. David Bergstein:

    Structurally they are betting the farm and everything possible to get through these midterms, and they are just opening up the checkbook to do it. ' Public investment shrinks as safety net balloonsWhatever the immediate political impact, if President Joe Biden ultimately signs anything like the proposed program, it would mark a new era in Washington's role in the economy.Over the past 50 years, federal spending, as a share of the nation's economic output, has averaged about 20.6 %, according to calculations by the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, a centrist group that argues for budgetary restraint. Washington has significantly exceeded that level only in times of crisis : Spending reached 24 % of the nation's gross domestic product during Obama's first term immediately after the 2008 financial crisis and roughly 32 % during the Covid pandemic, federal figures show. ( Federal spending as a share of the economy reached its modern high of more than 40 % at the height of World War II.) Though federal spending over the past half century has remained relatively constant at about one-fifth of the economy, the composition of that spending has shifted dramatically. Over that period, public investment -- defined primarily as federal spending on infrastructure, education and training, and support for research and development -- has declined, while the safety net -- including such payments to individuals as Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, food assistance and various tax credits for families -- has soared. Its totally different from anything put forward by Obama or Clinton. In terms of any kind of coherent strategic focus theres been nothing like this since the build-out of the suburbs, and the buildup of the educational system.Josh Bivens, research director, Economic Policy InstituteIn 1969, federal figures show, public investment and payments to individuals each consumed nearly one-third of total federal spending, an amount equal to about 6 % of the economy. By 2019, the last year before Washington poured huge sums into the Covid crisis, public investment had fallen to just 12.5 % of Responsible Federal Budget while payments to individuals had grown past 70 %. Public investment now equals only about 2.5 % of the economy, while payments to individuals consume more than five times as much.The exact distribution between public investment and safety net spending in the Democratic plans isn't known, because the party hasn't released details on the funding levels in the $ 3.5 trillion budget blueprint that Senate Democrats recently agreed on. But it's clear that the proposal -- coupled with the bipartisan infrastructure agreement advancing on a separate track -- would represent a huge expansion on both fronts.The infusion of new money for public investment might be most striking, given how steadily it has lost ground in federal priorities. Public investment fell from about 30 % of federal spending in the late 1960s to about 20 % by the late 1970s and 15 % by the mid-1990s, a plateau from which it's since drifted further down except for a brief recovery under Obama's first-term stimulus plan. The budget plans Senate Democrats are advancing would provide a more lasting turnaround. The bipartisan plan would spend almost $ 600 billion on.

  2. Alan Song:

    Chinese entrepreneurs and investors must understand that the age of reckless capital expansion is over, a new era that prioritises fairness over efficiency has begun.

  3. Ken Holland:

    Once the expansion draft is over, I expect things would heat up.

  4. Renzo Olivari:

    Glenn Youngkin brags he's honored to have Donald Trump's endorsement, so it's no surprise he's campaigning with another Trump lackey who shares his opposition to women's access to health care and Medicaid expansion.

  5. Billy Terry:

    This expansion provides reliable transportation for people who couldn't afford air fare, who don't have cars, a low to moderate income family can go to a family reunion, or get to more medical facilities.

Images & Illustrations of expansion

  1. expansionexpansionexpansionexpansionexpansion

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for expansion

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    the part played by a person in bringing about a result
    • A. contribution
    • B. aerial
    • C. vehicle
    • D. disguise

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