What does dublin mean?

Definitions for dublin
ˈdʌb lɪndublin

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word dublin.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Dublin, Irish capital, capital of Irelandnoun

    capital and largest city and major port of the Irish Republic

GCIDE

  1. Dublinnoun

    The capital city of Ireland. Population (2000) = nk.

Wiktionary

  1. Dublinnoun

    The capital of the Republic of Ireland.

    Etymology: From dubh + linn.

  2. Dublinnoun

    One of the counties of Ireland.

    Etymology: From dubh + linn.

Freebase

  1. Dublin

    Dublin is the capital and most populous city of Ireland. The English name for the city is derived from the Irish name Dubhlinn, meaning "black pool". Dublin is situated in the province of Leinster near the midpoint of Ireland's east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey and the centre of the Dublin Region. Originally founded as a Viking settlement, it evolved into the Kingdom of Dublin and became the island's principal city following the Norman invasion. The city expanded rapidly from the 17th century; it was briefly the second largest city in the British Empire and the fifth largest in Europe. Dublin entered a period of stagnation following the Act of Union of 1800, but it remained the economic centre for most of the island. Following the partition of Ireland in 1922, the new parliament, the Oireachtas, was located in Leinster House. Dublin became the capital of the Irish Free State and later the Republic of Ireland. Similar to the cities of Cork, Limerick, Galway and Waterford—Dublin is administered separately from its respective County with its own City Council. The city is listed by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network as a global city, with a ranking of "Alpha-", placing Dublin among the top 30 cities in the world. It is a historical and contemporary cultural centre for the country, as well as a modern centre of education, the arts, administration, economy, and industry.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Dublin

    the capital of Ireland, at the mouth of the Liffey, which divides it in two, and is crossed by 12 bridges; the principal and finest street is Sackville Street, which is about 700 yards long and 40 wide; it has a famous university and two cathedrals, besides a castle, the residence of the Lord-Lieutenant; and a park, the Phoenix, one of the finest in Europe; manufactures porter, whisky, and poplin.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. dublin

    The capital city of Ireland, on the Liffey, close to its entrance into Dublin Bay. It is alleged that this city has been in existence since the time of Ptolemy. In the earlier part of the 9th century, Dublin was taken by the Danes, who infested it for several centuries thereafter. In 1169 it was taken by storm by the English under Strongbow. From about this period the history of Dublin is that of Ireland.

Etymology and Origins

  1. Dublin

    From Dubh-linn, “black pool.”

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'dublin' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #3989

How to pronounce dublin?

How to say dublin in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of dublin in Chaldean Numerology is: 3

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of dublin in Pythagorean Numerology is: 8

Examples of dublin in a Sentence

  1. Rolling Stone:

    There was no bigger album of 2014 -- in terms of surprise, generosity and controversy, bono, the Edge, Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen Jr. put their lives on the line: giving away 11 songs of guitar rapture and frank, emotional tales of how they became a band out of the rough streets and spiritual ferment of Seventies Dublin.

  2. Arlene Foster:

    The Brexit negotiations have dominated our politics for three years. We need to respect the referendum result. The democratic decision has been made, whether in London or Brussels or indeed Dublin, now is the time to work for a sensible deal. The intransigence of the last three years must be left behind or else we are destined for a WTO exit in October.

  3. Deodatta V. Shenai-Khatkhate:

    I sometimes think that the acronyms BC and BCE probably stand for 'Before Coffee' and 'Before the Coffee Era' respectively, signifying those primitive historic years of underdevelopment. Coffee has strongly contributed to the development of many scientific breakthroughs, inventions, creative arts, and literature, IMHO. So, on National Coffee Day today, here's a Toast to the Roast - light, medium and dark alike: May your Cup of Coffee be just like the Capital of Ireland - always Dublin! Cheers!

  4. Conor McGregor:

    I come from a place called Crumlin, in Dublin 12. It’s a place dear to my heart. It’s where I learned how to fight; it made me who I am today. It’s a place I’m still very much a part of every single day of my life. So, that’s where the name came from. It’s proper Irish whiskey and twelve is my hometown, growing up on the streets of Dublin 12, I learned the values of loyalty and hard work. I respect other Irish whiskeys, but I am coming in strong, with passion and with purpose. I am the founder of this company and I am going to give it my all.

  5. Yvonne Rossiter -LRB- @msvonage -RRB-:

    Thank you for attending our show tonight in Dublin, we will see you in Cardiff and hopefully the vocals and sound will be much, much better... Pfft.

Images & Illustrations of dublin

  1. dublindublindublindublindublin

Popularity rank by frequency of use

dublin#1#4536#10000

Translations for dublin

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