What does cradle mean?

Definitions for cradle
ˈkreɪd lcra·dle

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word cradle.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. cradlenoun

    a baby bed with sides and rockers

  2. birthplace, cradle, place of origin, provenance, proveniencenoun

    where something originated or was nurtured in its early existence

    "the birthplace of civilization"

  3. cradlenoun

    birth of a person

    "he was taught from the cradle never to cry"

  4. rocker, cradleverb

    a trough that can be rocked back and forth; used by gold miners to shake auriferous earth in water in order to separate the gold

  5. cradleverb

    hold gently and carefully

    "He cradles the child in his arms"

  6. cradleverb

    bring up from infancy

  7. cradleverb

    hold or place in or as if in a cradle

    "He cradled the infant in his arms"

  8. cradleverb

    cut grain with a cradle scythe

  9. cradleverb

    wash in a cradle

    "cradle gold"

  10. cradleverb

    run with the stick

Wiktionary

  1. cradlenoun

    A bed or cot for a baby, oscillating on rockers or swinging on pivots.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  2. cradlenoun

    The place of origin, or in which anything is nurtured or protected in the earlier period of existence.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  3. cradlenoun

    Infancy, or very early life.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  4. cradlenoun

    An implement consisting of a broad scythe for cutting grain, with a set of long fingers parallel to the scythe, designed to receive the grain, and to lay it evenly in a swath.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  5. cradlenoun

    A tool used in mezzotint engraving, which, by a rocking motion, raises burrs on the surface of the plate, so preparing the ground.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  6. cradlenoun

    A framework of timbers, or iron bars, moving upon ways or rollers, used to support, lift, or carry ships or other vessels, heavy guns, etc., as up an inclined plane, or across a strip of land, or in launching a ship.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  7. cradlenoun

    A case for a broken or dislocated limb.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  8. cradlenoun

    A frame to keep the bedclothes from contact with the sensitive parts of an injured person.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  9. cradlenoun

    A machine on rockers, used in washing out auriferous earth.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  10. cradleverb

    To contain in or as if in a cradle.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  11. cradleverb

    To rock (a baby to sleep).

    Etymology: From cradol.

  12. cradleverb

    To wrap protectively.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  13. cradleverb

    To rock the lacrosse stick back and forth in order to keep the ball in the head by means of centrifugal force.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  14. cradlenoun

    A suspended scaffold used in shafts.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  15. cradlenoun

    A ribbing for vaulted ceilings and arches intended to be covered with plaster.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  16. cradlenoun

    A basket or apparatus in which, when a line has been made fast to a wrecked ship from the shore, the people are brought off from the wreck.

    The cradle was ill-made. One victim fell into the sea and was lost and the ensuing delay cost three more lives.

    Etymology: From cradol.

  17. cradlenoun

    A rest for the receiver of a telephone.

    He slammed the handset into the cradle.

    Etymology: From cradol.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Cradlenoun

    a bed or cot for a baby, oscillating on rockers or swinging on pivots; hence, the place of origin, or in which anything is nurtured or protected in the earlier period of existence; as, a cradle of crime; the cradle of liberty

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  2. Cradlenoun

    infancy, or very early life

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  3. Cradlenoun

    an implement consisting of a broad scythe for cutting grain, with a set of long fingers parallel to the scythe, designed to receive the grain, and to lay it evenly in a swath

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  4. Cradlenoun

    a tool used in mezzotint engraving, which, by a rocking motion, raises burrs on the surface of the plate, so preparing the ground

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  5. Cradlenoun

    a framework of timbers, or iron bars, moving upon ways or rollers, used to support, lift, or carry ships or other vessels, heavy guns, etc., as up an inclined plane, or across a strip of land, or in launching a ship

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  6. Cradlenoun

    a case for a broken or dislocated limb

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  7. Cradlenoun

    a frame to keep the bedclothes from contact with the person

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  8. Cradlenoun

    a machine on rockers, used in washing out auriferous earth; -- also called a rocker

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  9. Cradlenoun

    a suspended scaffold used in shafts

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  10. Cradlenoun

    the ribbing for vaulted ceilings and arches intended to be covered with plaster

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  11. Cradlenoun

    the basket or apparatus in which, when a line has been made fast to a wrecked ship from the shore, the people are brought off from the wreck

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  12. Cradleverb

    to lay to rest, or rock, as in a cradle; to lull or quiet, as by rocking

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  13. Cradleverb

    to nurse or train in infancy

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  14. Cradleverb

    to cut and lay with a cradle, as grain

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  15. Cradleverb

    to transport a vessel by means of a cradle

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

  16. Cradleverb

    to lie or lodge, as in a cradle

    Etymology: [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.]

Freebase

  1. Cradle

    Cradle is a 1988 science fiction novel by Arthur C. Clarke and Gentry Lee. The major premise of Cradle is contact between a few humans from the Miami area in 1994 and the super robots of a damaged space ship submerged off the Florida coast. Telecommunication advances such as videotelephones and highly efficient underwater scanning equipment used in the story bridge from the everyday, real-life aspects of the setting toward the near future, bespeaking technological progress.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Cradle

    krā′dl, n. a bed or crib in which children are rocked: (fig.) infancy: the place where one is born and brought up: a frame in which anything is imbedded: a case for a broken limb: a frame under a ship for launching it: a box on rockers for washing auriferous dirt.—v.t. to lay or rock in a cradle: to nurture.—adj. Crā′dled, laid in a cradle.—ns. Crā′dle-scythe, a broad scythe used in a cradle for cutting grain; Crā′dle-walk, an avenue arched over with trees; Crā′dling.—From the cradle, from birth, from the first. [A.S. cradol; ety. obscure.]

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. cradle

    A frame consisting of bilge-ways, poppets, &c., on the principle of the wedge, placed under the bottom of a ship, and resting on the ways on which it slips, thus launching her steadily into the water, at which time it supports her weight while she slides down the greased ways. The cradle being the support of the ship, she carries it with her into the water, when, becoming buoyant, the frame separates from the hull, floats on the surface, and is again collected for similar purposes.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. cradle

    A narrow frame-work of heavy timbers upon which heavy guns are sometimes placed, to be moved upon rollers.

Anagrams for cradle »

  1. credal, reclad

How to pronounce cradle?

  1. Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Indian

How to say cradle in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of cradle in Chaldean Numerology is: 9

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of cradle in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of cradle in a Sentence

  1. Chaim Silberstein:

    This is the very essence and the very cradle of Jewish civilization, going back to the very beginning of the bible, this provides the legitimacy of us sitting in Tel Aviv, in Haifa, and Netanya.

  2. Formula One:

    We have always said that, if it is to have a long-term future, our sport must preserve its historic venues and Silverstone and Great Britain represent the cradle of this sport, formula One is a global sport, held on five continents, watched by an audience of over 500 million fans around the world and our aim is to grow this number by bringing the sport we love to new countries, while also maintaining its roots.

  3. Stephanie Baker:

    This find really challenged us. We compared the assembled skullcap to all of the other examples of hominins in the Cradle area. Eventually, its teardrop shape and relatively big brain cavity meant we were looking at Homo erectus.

  4. Rabindranath Tagore:

    The same stream of life that runs through my veins night and day runs through the world and dances in rhythmic measures. It is the same life that shoots in joy through the dust of the earth in numberless blades of grass and breaks into tumultuous waves of leaves and flowers. It is the same life that is rocked in the ocean-cradle of birth and of death, in ebb and in flow. I feel my limbs are made glorious by the touch of this world of life. And my pride is from the life-throb of ages dancing in my blood this moment.

  5. Musin Almat Zhumabekovich:

    We are a broken nature, we are divorced from the laws of nature from the romantic philosophy of being, but we preserve the pragmatism of the Stone Age. This is what connects us to the natural world. Instincts are our cradle of nature. On a cognitive level, thought development is how human evolution develops.

Images & Illustrations of cradle

  1. cradlecradlecradlecradlecradle

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for cradle

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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    be present or associated with an event or entity
    • A. accompany
    • B. refine
    • C. demolish
    • D. carry

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