What does caduceus mean?

Definitions for caduceus
kəˈdu si əs, -syus, -ʃəs, -ˈdyu-; -siˌaɪca·duceus

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word caduceus.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. caduceus(noun)

    an insignia used by the medical profession; modeled after the staff of Hermes

Wiktionary

  1. caduceus(Noun)

    The official wand carried by a herald in ancient Greece and Rome, specifically the one carried in mythology by Hermes, the messenger of the gods, usually represented with two snakes twined around it.

    Etymology: Via caduceus, caduceum, adaptation of Doric καρύκειον. This and Attic Greek κηρύκειον are derived from κῆρυξ. Related to κηρύσσω.

  2. caduceus(Noun)

    A symbol () representing a staff with two snakes wrapped around it, used to indicate merchants and messengers, and also sometimes as a symbol of medicine.

    Etymology: Via caduceus, caduceum, adaptation of Doric καρύκειον. This and Attic Greek κηρύκειον are derived from κῆρυξ. Related to κηρύσσω.

Wikipedia

  1. Caduceus

    The caduceus (☤; ; Latin: cādūceus, from Greek: κηρύκειον kērū́keion "herald's wand, or staff") is the staff carried by Hermes in Greek mythology and consequently by Hermes Trismegistus in Greco-Egyptian mythology. The same staff was also borne by heralds in general, for example by Iris, the messenger of Hera. It is a short staff entwined by two serpents, sometimes surmounted by wings. In Roman iconography, it was often depicted being carried in the left hand of Mercury, the messenger of the gods. Some accounts suggest that the oldest known imagery of the caduceus has its roots in a Mesopotamian origin with the Sumerian god Ningishzida; whose symbol, a staff with two snakes intertwined around it, dates back to 4000 BC to 3000 BC.As a symbolic object, it represents Hermes (or the Roman Mercury), and by extension trades, occupations, or undertakings associated with the god. In later Antiquity, the caduceus provided the basis for the astrological symbol representing the planet Mercury. Thus, through its use in astrology, alchemy, and astronomy it has come to denote the planet and elemental metal of the same name. It is said the wand would wake the sleeping and send the awake to sleep. If applied to the dying, their death was gentle; if applied to the dead, they returned to life.By extension of its association with Mercury and Hermes, the caduceus is also a recognized symbol of commerce and negotiation, two realms in which balanced exchange and reciprocity are recognized as ideals. This association is ancient, and consistent from the Classical period to modern times. The caduceus is also used as a symbol representing printing, again by extension of the attributes of Mercury (in this case associated with writing and eloquence). The caduceus is often incorrectly used as a symbol of healthcare organizations and medical practice, particularly in the United States of America, due to confusion with the traditional medical symbol, the Rod of Asclepius, which has only one snake and is never depicted with wings - the logo of the World Health Organization uses the Rod of Asclepius as its basis.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Caduceus(noun)

    the official staff or wand of Hermes or Mercury, the messenger of the gods. It was originally said to be a herald's staff of olive wood, but was afterwards fabled to have two serpents coiled about it, and two wings at the top

    Etymology: [L. caduceum, caduceus; akin to Gr. a herald's wand, fr. herald.]

Freebase

  1. Caduceus

    The caduceus is the staff carried by Hermes in Greek mythology. The same staff was also borne by heralds in general, for example by Iris, the messenger of Hera. It is a short staff entwined by two serpents, sometimes surmounted by wings. In Roman iconography it was often depicted being carried in the left hand of Mercury, the messenger of the gods, guide of the dead and protector of merchants, shepherds, gamblers, liars, and thieves. As a symbolic object it represents Hermes, and by extension trades, occupations or undertakings associated with the god. In later Antiquity the caduceus provided the basis for the astrological symbol representing the planet Mercury. Thus, through its use in astrology and alchemy, it has come to denote the elemental metal of the same name. By extension of its association with Mercury and Hermes, the caduceus is also a recognized symbol of commerce and negotiation, two realms in which balanced exchange and reciprocity are recognized as ideals. This association is ancient, and consistent from the Classical period to modern times. The caduceus is also used as a symbol representing printing, again by extension of the attributes of Mercury.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Caduceus

    the winged rod of Hermes, entwined with two serpents; originally a simple olive branch; was in the hands of the god possessed of magical virtues; it was the symbol of peace.

Suggested Resources

  1. caduceus

    The caduceus symbol -- In this Symbols.com article you will learn about the meaning of the caduceus symbol and its characteristic.

Mythology

  1. Caduceus

    (Cadu′ceus). The rod carried by Mercury. It has two winged serpents entwined round the top end. It was supposed to possess the power of producing sleep, and Milton refers to it inas the “opiate rod.”

How to pronounce caduceus?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say caduceus in sign language?

  1. caduceus

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of caduceus in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of caduceus in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Images & Illustrations of caduceus

  1. caduceuscaduceuscaduceuscaduceuscaduceus

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Translations for caduceus

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